Series 7: The Contenders

Series 7: The Contenders

5.0 4
Director: Daniel Minahan

Cast: Brooke Smith, Glenn Fitzgerald, Marylouise Burke

     
 

Daniel Minahan's wicked media satire Serie 7: The Contenders comes to DVD with a widescreen anamorphic transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.85:1. English soundtracks are rendered in Dolby Digital 5.1 and Dolby Digital Stereo. There are no subtitles, but the soundtracks are closed-captioned. Supplemental materials include aSee more details below

Overview

Daniel Minahan's wicked media satire Serie 7: The Contenders comes to DVD with a widescreen anamorphic transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.85:1. English soundtracks are rendered in Dolby Digital 5.1 and Dolby Digital Stereo. There are no subtitles, but the soundtracks are closed-captioned. Supplemental materials include a commentary track recorded by the director, footage of the scene work done at the Sundance Lab, deleted scenes, trailers, filmographies, and a still photo gallery. This is a quality release from USA Entertainment.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Daniel Minahan's remarkable debut feature has the sting of some of the best American media send-ups (Network, for starters), but its timeliness gives it an impressive ardor all its own. One of the more inventive and audacious recent films to explore the nation's obsession with sensationalism, the movie scores also as bona fide entertainment, reeling in the viewer in the same way an actual "reality" program might. The violence-as-spectatorship angle has been explored onscreen before, but never with such gallows humor and insight. Wisely conceived in crisp digital video, it is the rare satire that truly gets inside the mindset of the medium it examines, to a point that it's difficult to separate reality from fiction. Just when one thinks Series 7 has exhausted its possibilities, it always has one more trick up its sleeve. The cast is exceptional, providing real dimension to characters that could have been cardboard and throwaway; in a potentially star-making role, the gifted Brooke Smith renders every detail expertly observed. A film that is bound to be misunderstood my some audiences, Series 7 is completely of its time. The film was developed at the Sundance Labs in both the screenplay and directorial phases, and had its premiere at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival to mostly positive notices. Jason Clark
All Movie Guide - Jason Clark
Daniel Minahan's remarkable debut feature has the sting of some of the best American media send-ups (Network, for starters), but its timeliness gives it an impressive ardor all its own. One of the more inventive and audacious recent films to explore the nation's obsession with sensationalism, the movie scores also as bona fide entertainment, reeling in the viewer in the same way an actual "reality" program might. The violence-as-spectatorship angle has been explored onscreen before, but never with such gallows humor and insight. Wisely conceived in crisp digital video, it is the rare satire that truly gets inside the mindset of the medium it examines, to a point that it's difficult to separate reality from fiction. Just when one thinks Series 7 has exhausted its possibilities, it always has one more trick up its sleeve. The cast is exceptional, providing real dimension to characters that could have been cardboard and throwaway; in a potentially star-making role, the gifted Brooke Smith renders every detail expertly observed. A film that is bound to be misunderstood my some audiences, Series 7 is completely of its time. The film was developed at the Sundance Labs in both the screenplay and directorial phases, and had its premiere at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival to mostly positive notices.
Entertainment Weekly - Owen Gleiberman
The movie has the look and feel of one of those Saturday Night Live miniparodies that's exquisitely clever and close to the bone.
Village Voice - Amy Taubin
Series 7 could have turned out as ugly as the second season of "Survivor," were it not for the pleasure Minahan takes in melodrama.
New York Post
The most devastating spoof of reality TV since Albert Brooks' 1978 Real Life. Lou Lumenick

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Product Details

Release Date:
12/18/2001
UPC:
0696306024323
Original Release:
2001
Rating:
R
Source:
Polygram Usa Video
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital, stereo]
Time:
1:27:00

Special Features

Commentary by director Daniel Minahan; The Sundance Filmmakers Lab Scenes; International promo; Theatrical trailers; TV spots; Deleted scenes; Stills gallery; One-on-one filmographies; Widescreen 16:9; Dolby Digital English 5.1 and 2.0 audio; English closed captioned; Dual-layered

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Brooke Smith Dawn
Glenn Fitzgerald Jeff
Marylouise Burke Connie
Richard Venture Franklin
Merritt Wever Lindsay
Nada Despotovich Michelle
Donna Hanover Sheila
Danton Stone Bob
Jennifer Van Dyck Laura
Tanny Mc Donald Dawn's Mother
Will Arnett Narrator

Technical Credits
Daniel Minahan Director,Screenwriter
Randy Drummond Cinematographer
Malcolm Jamieson Editor
Jason Kliot Producer
Pamela Koffler Associate Producer
Michael Lerman Asst. Director
Gretchen McGowan Co-producer
Eddie O'Connor Sound/Sound Designer
Gideon Ponte Production Designer
Katie Roumel Producer
Susan Shopmaker Casting
Christine Vachon Producer
Joana Vicente Producer

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Scene Index

Side #1 --
0. Chapters
1. Viewer Discretion Is Advised [1:48]
2. The Contenders: Series 7 Marathon [5:51]
3. It's Homecoming [12:40]
4. Let the Games Begin [8:31]
5. As Simple as Life and Death [6:38]
6. These Cats Don't Have 9 Lives [3:56]
7. "Love Will Tear Us Apart" [8:49]
8. Can Connie Kill Again? [3:48]
9. It's Time to Get Proactive [7:19]
10. Two Lives Hang in the Balance [5:43]
11. Showdown: The Series Finale [4:52]
12. One Mistake and It's "Game Over" [2:25]
13. The Ultimate Battle [2:40]
14. Sudden Death Overtime [6:06]
15. Series 8 [6:04]

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