Shanghai Ghetto

Shanghai Ghetto

Director: Dana Janklowicz-Mann, Amir Mann

Cast: Dana Janklowicz-Mann, Amir Mann, Martin Landau

     
 
In the late 1930s, as the Nazis tightened their grip on Europe and the fate of Germany's Jewish population began to look increasingly grim, many Jews began seeking refuge wherever they could find it. However, with Europe no longer safe and passage to Great Britain or the United States frequently unavailable, many were forced to seek out other destinations; one

Overview

In the late 1930s, as the Nazis tightened their grip on Europe and the fate of Germany's Jewish population began to look increasingly grim, many Jews began seeking refuge wherever they could find it. However, with Europe no longer safe and passage to Great Britain or the United States frequently unavailable, many were forced to seek out other destinations; one unexpected haven turned out to be Shanghai, which was willing to take in the refugees. However, with the Chinese city under Japanese occupation following the Sino-Japanese war, Jews were forced into a squalid tumbledown ghetto known as Hong Kew, and treated with little respect by the ruling forces. But despite the fact the Japanese went out of their way to make life difficult for the refugees, the people of Shanghai, themselves familiar with violent treatment by outside political forces, for the most part embraced the new settlers, and many of the refugees regarded the people of Shanghai with tremendous gratitude. The Shanghai Ghetto is a documentary which examines this often overlooked footnote in the history of World War II; survivors of the Hong Kew ghetto share their memories of the experience, while war historians discuss the impotence of the Shanghai refugees. Actor Martin Landau narrates.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Todd Kristel
The plight of Jews who fled from the Nazis to Shanghai is an interesting topic for a documentary. However, this is not the only movie on this topic (the 1999 documentary The Port of Last Resort also addresses it), and the filmmaking in Shanghai Ghetto is more methodical than inspired. Overall, this is a fairly conventional documentary, featuring voice-over narration, talking heads, montages of photographs, and archival footage. Unfortunately, sometimes the editing seems a bit clumsy and the images seem too murky and lacking in contrast. Also, some viewers may feel that the documentary devotes too much time to background information on the Holocaust, particularly Kristallnacht, instead of providing more details on what happened in Shanghai (this movie isn't the ideal starting point for people without prior knowledge of the Holocaust, and those with prior knowledge presumably know about Kristallnacht already). Nonetheless, the filmmakers succeed at their primary goal of getting across information about Jewish refugees in Shanghai, and the interviewees are both articulate and compelling enough to give this film some emotional weight.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/25/2005
UPC:
0767685969533
Original Release:
2002
Rating:
NR
Source:
New Video Group
Presentation:
[B&W, Colorized]
Time:
1:35:00
Sales rank:
17,022

Special Features

Hebrew and English subtitles; Filmmaker commentary; Deleted interviews; Theatrical trailer; Filmmaker biographies; Resources; Interactive menus; Scene selection

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. A World Apart [8:03]
2. Domestic Terrorism [8:50]
3. An Ungodly Hour [7:10]
4. Living Conditions [8:49]
5. Skills and Trade [6:57]
6. Ruled by Force [7:31]
7. Memories of a Childhood [9:09]
8. Enemies of the Occupation [8:47]
9. A Home Away From Home [9:41]
10. Ghetto Residence [2:35]
11. The Horror Unveiled [7:18]
12. Credits [8:40]

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