Shutter Island

Shutter Island

4.4 19
Director: Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley

Cast: Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley

     
 

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Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio team up for a fourth time for this adaptation of Shutter Island, a novel by Dennis Lehane (Mystic River). The film opens in 1954 as World War II veteran and current federal marshal Teddy

Overview

Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio team up for a fourth time for this adaptation of Shutter Island, a novel by Dennis Lehane (Mystic River). The film opens in 1954 as World War II veteran and current federal marshal Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his new partner, Chuck (Mark Ruffalo), ferry to Shutter Island, a water-bound mental hospital housing the criminally insane. They have been asked to investigate the disappearance of Rachel Solando (Emily Mortimer), a patient admitted to the asylum after she murdered her three children. As Teddy quizzes Dr. Cawley (Ben Kingsley), the head of the institution, he begins to suspect that the authorities in charge might not be giving him the whole truth, and that a terrible fate may befall all the patients in the spooky Ward C -- a unit devoted to the most heinous of the hospital's inmates. Complicating matters further, Teddy has a secret of his own -- the arsonist who murdered his wife is incarcerated on Shutter Island. Driven to confront his wife's killer, and stranded on the island because of a hurricane, Teddy must unravel the secrets of the eerie place before succumbing to his own madness. Max von Sydow, Emily Mortimer, Michelle Williams, Patricia Clarkson, and Jackie Earle Haley round out the supporting cast.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
Martin Scorsese's adaptation of Dennis Lehane's Shutter Island represents yet another striking examination of guilt and the quest for redemption by the director, this time through the lens of a twisty psychological thriller. The film artfully displays how effortlessly Scorsese can weave his recurring obsession with these concepts into one of the few genres he hasn't tackled. The movie opens in 1954 as World War II veteran and current federal marshal Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his new partner, Chuck (Mark Ruffalo), ferry to Shutter Island, a water-bound mental hospital housing the criminally insane. They have been asked to investigate the disappearance of Rachel Solando (Emily Mortimer), a patient admitted to the asylum after she murdered her three children. As Teddy quizzes Dr. Cawley (Ben Kingsley), the head of the institution, he begins to suspect that the authorities in charge might not be giving him the whole truth, and that a terrible fate may befall all the patients in the spooky Ward C -- a unit devoted to the most heinous of the hospital's inmates. Complicating matters further, Teddy has a secret of his own -- the arsonist who murdered his wife is incarcerated on Shutter Island. Driven to confront his wife's killer, and stranded on the island because of a hurricane, Teddy must unravel the secrets of the eerie place before succumbing to his own madness. This is far from the most original plot ever devised, but Scorsese and company so insistently pile on layers of paranoia and dread that you quickly forgive the familiarity. Teddy is haunted by nightmares about his late wife, as well as what he saw as an infantryman when he was part of a squad that liberated the Jews imprisoned at Dachau. There are ongoing references to the hydrogen bomb, and the patients are spooked by this new-fangled contraption they've heard about called "television" -- where pictures and voices fly through the sky. The movie makes modern life -- or at least modern life in the '50s -- feel panic-inducing. And make no mistake, this is a movie designed to instill paranoia. The stylized clothing and speech -- everyone talks like they're in a movie from the '50s -- act to keep us distanced from everything, so that we never can shake the feeling that something just isn't right, and all the mysterious visions and talk of horrific experiments on the patients make the fear unrelenting. Even the sound design adds to the terror in a variety of ways; a subtle echo makes the inside of the buildings feel cavernous, and there are long stretches of silence disconcertingly punctuated by sudden sound effects. At the center of it all is Leonardo DiCaprio, an actor who after nearly 15 years of excellent work can still surprise with his talent. His performance is difficult to praise without ruining some of the movie's suspense, but as the final credits roll you can't help but think back on what you've seen and marvel at how complicated his role is; what initially seems like a fairly one-note performance blossoms into a fully realized portrait of a good man beaten down by what he's experienced. But he's far from the only standout in the cast: Mark Ruffalo provides flawless support as his partner, Ben Kingsley savors every morsel of his dialogue, and Patricia Clarkson delivers a show-stopping monologue about how easy it is to keep someone in an insane asylum with such intensity that it might be the scariest moment in the whole film. In addition to those fine actors, Scorsese and his casting director have filled out the supporting roles with actors recognizable as some of the scariest screen psychos in recent memory. Ted Levine (Buffalo Bill from The Silence of the Lambs) plays the head of security; John Carroll Lynch (the main suspect in David Fincher's Zodiac) portrays a guard; Jackie Earle Haley (the sex offender in Little Children, as well as the new Freddy Krueger) has a frightening and memorable scene as a patient Teddy knew from before; and Max von Sydow, as imposing and serious a figure as the movies have ever given us, plays a German doctor who may have ties to the Nazis. Scorsese deftly plays on our collective memory of these actors to maintain the sense that the threat to Teddy's safety is omnipresent. And it's not just the history of actors that Scorsese exploits, but movie history as well. Shutter Island is as much about Alfred Hitchcock's ability to build and maintain suspense and Jacques Tourneur's skills at scaring the audience with what is unseen as it is about finding a missing killer. But the style never gets in the way of the substance -- Shutter Island could be the first movie you've ever seen and it would still unsettle you. Even for those who early on feel they've figured out what's going on in the movie -- and the clues are right out in the open -- Scorsese isn't relying on a shocking revelation to make the film worthwhile. In fact, the story ends on a disturbingly ambiguous note that highlights how much more he has on his mind than simple chills. Scorsese is right back where he always is, searching for redemption.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/01/2013
UPC:
0883929303076
Original Release:
2010
Source:
Paramount Catalog
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital Stereo, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Sales rank:
2,129

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Leonardo DiCaprio Teddy Daniels
Mark Ruffalo Chuck Aule
Ben Kingsley Dr. Cawley
Michelle Williams Dolores
Max von Sydow Dr. Naehring
Patricia Clarkson Dr. Rachel Solando
Emily Mortimer Rachel Solando
Jackie Earle Haley George Noyce
Ted Levine Warden
John Carroll Lynch Dep. Warden McPherson
Elias Koteas Andrew Laeddis
Ruby Jerins Young Girl
Robin Bartlett Mrs. Kearns

Technical Credits
Martin Scorsese Director,Producer
Chris Brigham Executive Producer
Dante Ferretti Production Designer
Bradley J. Fischer Producer
Amy Herman Co-producer
Laeta Kalogridis Executive Producer,Screenwriter
Dennis Lehane Executive Producer
Mike Medavoy Producer
Arnie Messer Producer
Gianni Nunnari Executive Producer
Louis Phillips Executive Producer
Sandy Powell Costumes/Costume Designer
Joseph P. Reidy Co-producer
Robert Richardson Cinematographer
Robbie Robertson Musical Direction/Supervision
Thelma Schoonmaker Editor
Emma Tillinger Co-producer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Shutter Island
1. Scene 1 [:00]
2. Scene 2 [:00]
3. Scene 3 [:00]
4. Scene 4 [:02]
5. Scene 5 [:00]
6. Scene 6 [:00]
7. Scene 7 [6:31]
8. Scene 8 [:33]
9. Scene 9 [6:01]
10. Scene 10 [:55]
11. Scene 11 [6:17]
12. Scene 12 [:44]
13. Scene 13 [5:30]
14. Scene 14 [1:50]
15. Scene 15 [6:27]
16. Scene 16 [:32]
17. Scene 17 [5:55]
18. Scene 18 [:40]
19. Scene 19 [6:24]
20. Scene 20 [1:18]

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Shutter Island 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
Heard a lot about this. And the ending. I meant not a lot but hints of it? Anyway, this was interesting, suspenseful and a little tense.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Martin Scorsese, as usual, does an excellent job of bringing a story to the screen. The story, however, was shamelessly ripped off by pulp author Dennis Lehane, from the 1962 film "The Cabinet of Caligari". The film is definitely worth watching and keep you glued to your seat - so, put the cat out and go pee, cuz you won't want to miss a thing!
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DarkLotusICP4life More than 1 year ago
one totally awesome movie!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I hadn't really heard of Shutter Island until after a friend of mine said that she went to see it in the theater. She said that it was really good. I asked her what it was about and she said that she couldn't explain it without giving stuff away. After that I couldn't wait to see it. I love Leonardo DiCaprio so that just made the movie that much better. When I first started watching it, I wasn't exactly sure about it. The beginning just didn't seem all that strong...but it got way better. There isn't all that much action in the movie, but it kept me on the edge of my seat none the less. I have to admitt that it isn't the best movie in the world, but it definitely towards the top. I recommend Shutter Island to anyone who loves a good mystery and suspense.
Apollo_Faint-Of-Hearts More than 1 year ago
The previews for this movie emphasized a huge twist in the ending, and that said twist would be unforgettable. Well, I saw everything coming about 20 minutes into the movie, and I kind of feel like this movie in general was just weak for the reputation Scorsese and DiCaprio (especially together) have built for themselves. Those disappointments aside, it was an interesting movie. The acting did the film justice; Sir Ben Kingsley and DiCaprio played their characters with conviction. As I do with most movies, I recommend you give this a chance. It is at least worth saying you've seen.
nonfreak More than 1 year ago
Gives you a real sense of how detailed delusions as the result of mental illness can be. You can get this same movie on Amazon for $16.99
H8C More than 1 year ago
"Shutter Island" is a Martin Scorsese picture that doesn't feel like your typical Martin Scorsese picture. It is far more grungy than a lot of things he's done in the last many years, but still it doesn't lose focus through out it's 138 minute running time. Even though I haven't read the book, I've been told I need to. Dennis Lehane, the author, has had his share of books translated to screen in the last 7 years, "Mystic River", "Gone Baby Gone" and now "Shutter Island". I've read a collection of his short stories and Mystic River, and one comes to the conclusion that he writes in a way that rides a fine line between the semi-corny detective novels and classic mystery novels. If Dennis Lahane was a young adult in the 40's and 50's, he would have been the one to write the "Lone Ranger" books. The script does have it's share of exposition, where it feel very book-ish, where characters suddenly, but with some purposeful push, dump (for lack of a better word) a load of information out so us as the audience can understand a few things a little better. It doesn't happen often, but when it does, it's a bit of a distraction. Leonardo DiCaprio continues to prove that he is among the best actors working today. He was simply fantastic, as was the rest of the cast, but especially DiCaprio. While I wasn't moved to tears by any means, I was moved in a way that I felt a certain amount of frustration that his character had while conducting his investigation. Of all his films in the last 10 years, I really felt DiCaprio did quite a bit of research and let everything lose for this film. It shows. It was fun seeing Max von Sydow in the film, and one could say the role of the old psychiatrist was made for him, but it seemed the opposite of that for me. This role was given to him because he's Max von Sydow. I believe how Scorsese handled this film was smart. For me it seemed like he never acknowledged that it was a '"horror" film. So thinking of it as just drama with elevated suspense allowed him to jump of out what it could have been if another director tackled the script knowing they were making a horror film. I kept thinking of Kubrick and "The Shining" at times. "The Shining" is a great, if not obvious comparison of well respected director taking on the "horror" genre. Technically "Shutter Island" was what you'd expect from Scorsese, but he held back on some of his camera moves and editing from the last few years. I greatly appreciated that. I have been quietly vocal for years about how much I dislike the way Thelma Schoonmaker edits. I went so far as 'Booing' the television when she Won Oscars for editing "The Departed" and "The Aviator", that's how serious I feel about her editing. The last film she cut where I felt the insanity was justified was "Bringing out the Dead", otherwise it's been quick cuts and flashy for no other purpose than that's what Scorsese and Schoonmaker do. "Shutter Island" was easily Scorsese's best movie of the last 15 years.
bridget3420 More than 1 year ago
I loved this movie! The plot and the acting were superb. This is definitely a DVD I want to add to my collection. If you're into the psychological thrillers, this is right up your alley.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This movie was pretty good, but I had to watch it at least 3 times to understand it. It not horror, but more of mystery.
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