Slacker

( 5 )

Overview

One of the key American independent films of the 1990s, Richard Linklater's feature debut is an audacious look at the twentysomething culture in the college town of Austin, Texas. Set over the course of a 24-hour period, the film is a collection of short, unconnected glimpses into the dropout subculture, touching base with a variety of musicians, students, street people and general eccentrics. While there's no real plot to speak of, Linklater's eye for nuance and gift for dialogue are superb, and the portrait he ...
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Overview

One of the key American independent films of the 1990s, Richard Linklater's feature debut is an audacious look at the twentysomething culture in the college town of Austin, Texas. Set over the course of a 24-hour period, the film is a collection of short, unconnected glimpses into the dropout subculture, touching base with a variety of musicians, students, street people and general eccentrics. While there's no real plot to speak of, Linklater's eye for nuance and gift for dialogue are superb, and the portrait he paints is so uncannily accurate that the term "slacker" was almost immediately co-opted as a media buzzword, one interchangeable with the similarly-overused "Generation X." Regardless, the film is an evocative reflection of a community and its culture and remains a definitive artifact of its time and place.
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Special Features

Restored high-definition digital film transfer, supervised by director Richard Linklater and director of photography Lee Daniel, with 2.0 surround DTS-HD master audio soundtrack; Three audio commentaries, featuring Linklater and members of the cast and crew; It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1988), Linklater's first feature, with commentary by the director; Woodshock (1985), a 16 mm short by Linklater and Daniel; Casting tapes featuring select "auditions"; Footage from the Slacker tenth-anniversary reunion; Early film treatment; Home movies; Ten-minute trailer for a 2005 documentary about the landmark Austin café Les Amis; Deleted scenes and alternate takes; Trailer; ; Plus: a booklet featuring essays by author and filmmaker John Pierson and Sony Pictures Classics copresident Michael Barker; reviews by critics Ron Rosenbaum and Chris Walters; production notes by Linklater; and an introduction to It's Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books by director Monte Hellman
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Dan Jardine
History may be written by the winners, but in movies like Slacker we learn that life's lovable losers often have a far more engaging story to tell. The spiritual anomie afflicting the generation of the then-29-year-old director Richard Linklater provides the backdrop for this meandering and essentially plot-less tale. These college-aged people in Austin, Texas have the freedom and resources to do just about anything, but they choose instead to do nothing. There is a morbid attractiveness to their subversiveness. In most cases, their non-participation in life is a well thought-out stance: "Withdrawing in disgust is not the same thing as apathy," as one of the slackers informs us. Like others before them (beatniks, hippies, punks), this generation of twenty-somethings need time to sort things out. The movie's titular characters represent America's subconscious; these are the midnight neuroses that we keep bottled up in our waking hours. Comparisons to such filmmakers as Luis Bunuel and Max Ophuls are apt, as Linklater's stream of consciousness direction follows a winding road that leads to no particular place at all. Ironically, this studied attempt to appear unscripted and spontaneous succeeds mainly because it is so carefully plotted. Thankfully, Linklater clearly identifies with his subjects, and celebrates their wackiness without resorting to a bitterly ironic pose that would have distanced us from the characters. The film's 97 minutes -- made for $23,000 -- provided more filmmaking bang for the buck than just about any film of the early 1990s; Slacker's no-budget breakthrough success prefigured other Sundance discoveries such as Robert Rodriguez's El Mariachi (1992) and Kevin Smith's Clerks (1994).
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/17/2013
  • UPC: 715515110419
  • Original Release: 1991
  • Rating:

  • Source: Criterion
  • Region Code: A
  • Presentation: Pan & Scan
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:40:00
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Sales rank: 860

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Richard Linklater Should Have Stayed at the Bus Station
Marc James Hit-and-run Son
Mark James Hit-and-run Son
Stella Weir Stephanie from Dallas
John Slate "Conspiracy A-Go-Go" Author
Louis Mackey Old Anarchist
Joseph Jones Old Man Recording Thoughts
Brecht Andersch Dostoyevsky Wannabe
Steve Anderson
Aleister Barron Peeping Kid
Rudy Basquez Taxi Driver
Albans Benchoff Coke Machine Robber
Nigel Benchoff Budding Capitalist Youth
Stewart Bennet Sitting on Ledge
Louis Black Paranoid Paper Reader
Bob Boyd Officer Bozzio
Meg Brennan Sitting at Cafe
Eric Buehlman Cafe Card Player #2
Jean Caggeine
Lori Capp Traumatized Yacht Owner
Jennifer Carroll All-Night Partier
Sean Coffey Super 8 Cameraman
Janelle Coolich
Brian Crockett Sadistic Comb Game Player
Lee Daniel GTO
Jerry Deloney Been on the Moon Since the 50's
Samuel Dietert Grocery Grabber of Death's Bounty
Daniel Dugan Comb Game Player
Ed Hall Band Playing at Club
Keith Fletcher Cafe Card Player #1
Skip Fulton Jr.
Regina Garza Smoking Writer
Charles Gunning Hitchhiker Awaiting "True Call"
Sarah Harmon Has Faith in Groups
Mark Harris T-Shirt Terrorist
Jan Hockey Jogger
Stephan Hockey Running Late
Phillip Hostak Hit Up for Cigarettes
Bruce Hughes Card Playing Waiter
Marianne Hyatt Late Night Pick-up
Robert Jacks Voice Only
Stephen Jacobson S-T-E-V-E with a Van
Terrence Kirk Officer Love
Dan Kratochvil Espresso Czar/Masonic Malcontent
Shelly Kristaponis Shoplifter
Kim Krizan Questions Happiness
Michael Laird Burglar
Gina Lalli Sidewalk Psychic
Kelly Linn Bike Rider with Nice Shoes
Eric Lord Doorman at Club
D. Angus MacDonald Video Playing Store Security
Nick Maffei
R. Malice Scooby Doo Philosopher
Scott Marcus Ultimate Loser
Ron Marks Bush Basher
Kathy McCarty Anarchist's Daughter
Keith McCormack Street Musician
D. Montgomery
Abra Moore Has Change
Nolan Morrison To Be Buried By History
Charlotte Norris Convertible Driver
Frank Orrall Happy-Go-Lucky Guy
Tom Pallotta Looking for Missing Friend
Debbie Pastor Wants to Leave Country
Robert Pierson Based on Authoritative Sources
Gary Price Watching Early Morning TV
Mark Quirk Papa Smurf
Rachel Reinhardt
Scott Rhodes
Tamsy Ringler Video Interviewer
Sharon Roos Devoted Follower
Kyle Rosenblad Going to Catch a Show
Luke Savisky Video Cameraman
Jennifer Schaudies Walking to Coffee Shop
Lucinda Scott Dairy Queen Photographer
Susannah Simone Working on Same Painting
Kendal Smith Post-Modern Paul Revere
Annick Souhami Has Conquered Fear of Rejection
John Spath Co-op Guy
Kalman Spellitich
Maris Strautmanis Giant Cappuccino
Don Stroud Recluse in Bathrobe
Patrice Sullivan Day Tripper
Teresa Taylor Papsmear Pusher
Kevin Thompson
Scott Van Horn
Gus Vayas Cranky Cook
Mimi Vitetta Teacup Sculpter
Clark Lee Walker Cadillac Crook
Wammo Anti-Artist
Greg Ward Tosses Camera Off Cliff
Heather West
Kevin Whitley Jilted Boyfriend
Greg Wilson Anti-Traveller
Technical Credits
Richard Linklater Director, Producer, Screenwriter
Lee Daniel Cinematographer
Debbie Pastor Art Director
Deborah Pastor Production Designer
Scott Rhodes Editor
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A truely unique and wonderful film

    What a treat it was when I first stumbled onto this film. This is my generation and my college days. One of the things I like about the film is its insightfulness into the working of day to day conversations. The nodding heads of listeners who are oblivious to what you are saying. And maybe they should be oblivious. The ending trails off into apparent nothingness and maybe it should. It was the only part I didn't care for. This is not a movie for dull people. It possesses a strong similarity to 'Waking Life'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2000

    Slacker is to the Ramen-noodle generation what 'Easy Rider' was to the last.

    I swear ... at one time or another during the early 90's I was each and every character in this movie or maybe I just knew them... this movie is like an acurate slice of time... some of the best.. most interesting characters ever put on film.... I give it five ramen-noodles and two thumbs up!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews