Slums Of Beverly Hills

( 3 )

Overview

Tamara Jenkins wrote and directed this comedy-drama depicting the experience of growing up poor in the 90210 zip code, told from the point of view of Vivian Abramowitz Natasha Lyonne, a teen who lives a nomadic existence in the outskirts of Beverly Hills with her single, divorced father, Murray Alan Arkin and her two young brothers David Krumholtz, Eli Marienthal. As Murray tries to keep the family in the Beverly Hills school district, the family moves into a one-bedroom apartment in a shabby complex. When ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $18.53   
  • Used (18) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$18.53
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(2424)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
086162103797 This item is brand new. Please allow 4 - 14 business days for Standard shipping, within the US. Thank you for supporting our small, family-owned business!

Ships from: ACWORTH, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Tamara Jenkins wrote and directed this comedy-drama depicting the experience of growing up poor in the 90210 zip code, told from the point of view of Vivian Abramowitz Natasha Lyonne, a teen who lives a nomadic existence in the outskirts of Beverly Hills with her single, divorced father, Murray Alan Arkin and her two young brothers David Krumholtz, Eli Marienthal. As Murray tries to keep the family in the Beverly Hills school district, the family moves into a one-bedroom apartment in a shabby complex. When sexually liberated Rita Marisa Tomei, daughter of Murray's brother Mickey Carl Reiner, checks out of a drug rehab and moves into the apartment, she becomes a "role model" for the young Vivian. Jenkins's semi-autobiographical screenplay was developed and refined during Screenwriters and Filmmakers Labs sessions at the Sundance Institute. Produced by Robert Redford and Michael Nozik, this film was shown in the Directors Fortnight section at the 1998 Cannes Film Festival.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Brian J. Dillard
This wry, wise, and frequently hilarious coming-of-age story heralded the arrival of two compelling indie talents: debut writer/director Tamara Jenkins and first-time leading lady Natasha Lyonne. Together, these two women turn Slums of Beverly Hills into a quietly great picture full of unforced laughter and unexpected insight. It helps that with Robert Redford as producer, Jenkins was able to snag such a stellar supporting cast, from Alan Arkin, Marisa Tomei, and Kevin Corrigan in solid leading roles to Carl Reiner, Jessica Walter, and Rita Moreno in small but amusing cameos. David Krumholtz, as the protagonist's pudgy pothead brother, gets the biggest laughs as he belts out show tunes from Guys and Dolls in his Fruit of the Looms. But it's Lyonne -- with her mixture of doe-eyed vulnerability, shrewd calculation, perpetual embarrassment, and trash-talking bravado -- who delivers the more thoughtful and affecting performance. Toxic families are easy comic fodder, but Jenkins has crafted a film in which the laughs are bittersweet and suffused with questions about sexual awakening and the screwed-up things parents do in the name of family devotion. It will probably be a while before Lyonne snags as stellar a showcase as Slums of Beverly Hills, but this one quietly wonderful film should keep both her Hollywood and indie dance cards full well into the next decade.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/19/1999
  • UPC: 086162103797
  • Original Release: 1998
  • Rating:

  • Source: 20th Century Fox
  • Region Code: 1
  • Aspect Ratio: Theatre Wide-Screen (1.85.1)
  • Presentation: Wide Screen / Dolby 5.1 / Stereo
  • Sound: Dolby Digital, stereo
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:33:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Natasha Lyonne Vivian
Alan Arkin Murray
Marisa Tomei Rita
Kevin Corrigan Eliot
Eli Marienthal Rickey
David Krumholtz Ben
Jessica Walter Doris
Carl Reiner Mickey
Rita Moreno Belle
Technical Credits
Tamara Jenkins Director, Screenwriter
Michael A. Allowitz Asst. Director
Robert Bennett Camera Operator
Gary Calamar Musical Direction/Supervision
Stephen Clancy Camera Operator
Kirsten Everberg Costumes/Costume Designer
Robert Greenfield Set Decoration/Design
Sheila Jaffe Casting
Rolfe Kent Score Composer
Pamela Martin Editor
Michael Nozik Producer
Scott Plauche Art Director
Robert Redford Executive Producer
Tom Richmond Cinematographer
G. Marq Roswell Musical Direction/Supervision
Dena Roth Production Designer
Ken Segal Sound/Sound Designer
Georgianne Walken Casting
Tim Walston Sound Editor
Stan Wlodkowski Producer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    In response to Mr. Shuler

    Mr. Shuler's salaciousness and depravity are unfortunately evident in his exegesis of this decadent film---which I have not seen, but I would forbid my Sunday school students to see it. Mr. Shuler has not changed in the intervening decades since I attempted to teach him American history in high school. Who disagrees with me?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    HahaHaha!

    A very funny look at low class living.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Loving Dysfunctional Family: Depressed Dad, Hottie Daughter, Dopehead Son...Just Like Your Own!

    This is one of the best growing up movies ever! Vivian (Natasha Lyonne in her first major lead role) is coping with being the only female in an all-male household; plus she's perturbed to have developed a rather large chest (this was a prosthesis; in reality Lyonne is not so hugely endowed). Her father (the Great Alan Arkin) is depressed and short of money; he hits up his rich brother Mickey (Carl Reiner) as needed. Meanwhile Vivian gets involved with the goofball neighbor (Kevin Corrigan) while she's doing the laundry; geez, it seems like the girl is always washing clothes--like a strong African-American mother, she tried to impose order on chaos. Her big brother (David Krumholtz), a doper obsessed with getting a part in a school play, is no help. Meanwhile, Mickey's daughter (Marissa Tomei) runs away from rehab and hooks up with her uncle. He launches a scheme to have her live with the family and Mickey'll set them up. It works for a while; Dad is hoping the older cousin will be a good role model for Vivian, but no such luck! Vivian's more mature than this spoiled rich girl! Great scenes: Lyonne and Tomei in ''The Vibrator Dance'': must be seen to be believed. The sad-puppy expression on Lyonne's face when Dad busts in on the revelry alone is worth whatever this costs! She does the most remarkable things with her flashing dark eyes, full lips, and sharp teeth! The next-to-final scene, where Vivian gives Uncle Mickey his comeuppance for his constant putdowns of her dad. Issues of ''middle-class poverty'' (i.e., Dad is a salesman, but the family constantly moves, staying one step ahead of landlords like a floating dice game), sexual awakenings of a teenaged girl, body acceptance (Vivian's chest and nose), and family relationships are wonderfully explored. The family's being Jewish is touched on but not fully addressed. Arkin, as always, is excellent. Tomei also gives an A-one performance. But it is Lyonne who carries the film just like she carries the family in it! This woman has what it takes to be the greatest screen diva of the new century! Since her appearance is not that of a Miss America or a Playmate of the Year (she's short and waif-like, but in the face she resembles the Robert Crumb cartoon goddess Honeybunch Kaminski--though definitely she's not a Crumb girl in the body) she may be passed over for great roles but that's everybody's loss. I'd like to see her play a truly despicable character sometime, but she never does: like Nick Nolte and Susan Sarandon, all her characters are always the most moral beings around (even when she plays tramps and thieves). Hmm, what's the future hold for this truly fine performer? Perhaps the title role in the Swords-and-Shopping epic ''Maureen Birnbaum, Barbarian Swordsperson''? As Israeli King David's beloved daughter Tamar who was raped by her brother? Or---here's where the despicable comes in---as the alcoholic lesbian prostitute serial killer Aileen Wuornos---but even she had redeeming qualities! With Lyonne in the role, the audience would be rooting for Wuornos as she kills her tricks! This woman is going places! Get this one to see her as she started out!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews