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Solid Gold Cadillac
     

The Solid Gold Cadillac

Director: Richard Quine, Judy Holliday, Paul Douglas, Fred Clark

Cast: Richard Quine, Judy Holliday, Paul Douglas, Fred Clark

 

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The Solid Gold Cadillac was adapted from the George S. Kaufman-Howard Teichmann Broadway hit of the same. Both the play and film were predicated upon the notion of a humble ten-share stockholder triumphing over a corrupt big-business board of directors, but there was one significant difference. In the stage version, septuagenarian Josephine Hull starred as

Overview

The Solid Gold Cadillac was adapted from the George S. Kaufman-Howard Teichmann Broadway hit of the same. Both the play and film were predicated upon the notion of a humble ten-share stockholder triumphing over a corrupt big-business board of directors, but there was one significant difference. In the stage version, septuagenarian Josephine Hull starred as Laura Partridge, a sweet little old lady who asks several embarrassing questions at a stockholder's meeting. In the film version, Laura's age is lowered by at least four decades to accommodate star Judy Holliday. In both versions, a romance develops between Laura Partridge and Edward L. McKeever, the owner of the corporation she takes on. McKeever (played in the film by Paul Douglas, Holliday's co-star in the Broadway version of Born Yesterday) is an honest man, which is more than can be said for his self-serving board of directors (Fred Clark, John Williams, Ray Collins et. al.) With McKeever's covert help, Laura, who has been given a dummy executive position in the corporation in hopes that she'll shut up, forms a stockholder's association intent upon throwing the rascals out. Though the dialogue in Solid Gold Cadillac is consistently entertaining, the film's best line goes to Judy Holliday: Describing her brief career as an actress in a Shakespearean troupe, she recalls ruefully that "No one's allowed to sit down unless you're a king." George Burns, taking over from the stage version's Fred Allen, provides the wry scene-setting narration. Currently available TV prints of The Solid Gold Cadillac have restored the original Technicolor final shot.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Judy Holliday was the kind of actress to whom the phrase "every home should have one" very definitely applied. A gifted comedienne, she shines in The Solid Gold Cadillac, playing the kind of part at which she excelled -- a down-to-earth girl whose seemingly loose screws are much tighter than they appear. Beyond her comedic talents, Holliday's special gift was a beautiful, almost tangible warmth which enveloped (but never overwhelmed) the screen; it's easy to understand why Paul Douglas' character would fall in love with her. Equally as important, this warmth gives credibility to some of the screenplay's stretches; it doesn't make them believable, but it makes them seem less manipulative and mechanical. Richard Quine's direction is fine -- unobtrusive but also not particularly involving. At least he trusts his actors, and they don't let him down. Douglas is an excellent foil for Holliday; his gruff exterior masks a similar common touch, and there's a touching vulnerability beneath his big gorilla exterior. The cast of excellent character actors, such as Fred Clark and John Williams, turn in solid, dependable performances. Artificial and at times too much of a period piece, Cadillac is still worth watching for its lovable leads.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/04/2012
UPC:
0043396241916
Original Release:
1956
Rating:
NR
Source:
Sony Pictures Home
Presentation:
[B&W]

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Judy Holliday Laura Partridge
Paul Douglas Edward L. McKeever
Fred Clark Clifford Snell
John Williams John T. Blessington
Neva Patterson Amelia Shotgraven
Hiram Sherman Harry Harkness
Arthur O'Connell Jenkins
Ralph Dumke Warren Gillie
Ray Collins Alfred Metcalfs
Richard Deacon Williams
Marilyn Hanold Miss L'Arriere
Anne Loos Blessington's Secretary
Audrey Swanson Snell's Secretary
Larry Hudson Chauffeur
Sandra White Receptionist
Harry Antrim Senator
Suzanne Alexander Model
Madge Blake Lady Commentator
Joe Hamilton 2nd Lawyer
Jean Harvey Farm Woman
Maurice Manson 1st Lawyer
Bud Osborne Spanish-American War Veteran
Voltaire Perkins Judge
Paul Weber Elevator Man
Lulu Mae Bohrman Dowager
Jack Latham Bill Parker
George Burns Narrator

Technical Credits
Richard Quine Director
Ross Bellah Art Director
Abe Burrows Screenwriter
Clay Campbell Makeup
George Cooper Sound/Sound Designer
Louis Diage Set Decoration/Design
William Kiernan Set Decoration/Design
Fred Kohlmar Producer
Charles B. Lang Cinematographer
Jean Louis Costumes/Costume Designer
Cyril Mockridge Score Composer
Irving Moore Asst. Director
Charles Nelson Editor
Lionel Newman Musical Direction/Supervision

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