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Stephanie Daley
     

Stephanie Daley

5.0 1
Director: Hilary Brougher, Tilda Swinton, Amber Tamblyn, Timothy Hutton

Cast: Hilary Brougher, Tilda Swinton, Amber Tamblyn, Timothy Hutton

 
A frightened and irresponsible girl and an emotionally conflicted woman are brought together under tragic circumstances in this independent drama. Stephanie Daley (Amber Tamblyn) is a 16-year-old girl who while on a school-sponsored ski trip collapses in a puddle of blood; a medical examination reveals that Stephanie has recently given

Overview

A frightened and irresponsible girl and an emotionally conflicted woman are brought together under tragic circumstances in this independent drama. Stephanie Daley (Amber Tamblyn) is a 16-year-old girl who while on a school-sponsored ski trip collapses in a puddle of blood; a medical examination reveals that Stephanie has recently given birth, and in a nearby bathroom a newborn child is found dead, flushed down a toilet with its mouth stuffed with toilet paper. While Stephanie insists the child was stillborn and she had no idea she was pregnant, she is charged with killing the infant, and court-appointed psychologist Lydie Crane (Tilda Swinton) is assigned to interview the teenager. Lydie has her own issues with possible parenthood; she's been struggling to have a child after a recent stillbirth, and the matter is taking a toll on her marriage, with her husband, Paul (Timothy Hutton), seeking solace in the arms of another woman. As Stephanie shares with Lydie her feelings about her relationship with her parents, how she lost her virginity, and her growing conviction that God gave her a child as a form of punishment, Lydie finds herself dealing with her own feelings about the child she lost. Meanwhile, Right to Life and Pro-Choice groups threaten to turn Stephanie's trial into a media circus. Stephanie Daley premiered at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/04/2007
UPC:
0796019804820
Original Release:
2006
Rating:
R
Source:
Liberation Ent
Region Code:
1
Time:
1:32:00

Special Features

Audio commentary with director Hilary Brougher, star Amber Tamblyn & cinematographer David Morrison; Audio commentary with producers Lynette Howell, Samara Koffler & Jen Roskind; "The Making of Stephanie Daley" documentary featurette; Deleted scenes; Trailers

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Tilda Swinton Lydie Crane
Amber Tamblyn Stephanie Daley
Timothy Hutton Paul
Denis O'Hare Frank
Melissa Leo Miri
Jim Gaffigan Joe
Deirdre O'Connell Jane
Halley Feiffer Rhana
Kel O'Neill Casey White
Neal Huff Mr. Thomas
John Ellison Conlee Jack Hutchinson
Vincent Piazza Jeff
Caitlin Van Zant Satin
Marceline Hugot Health Teacher
Kaiulani Lee Reverend
Novella Nelson Dr. Peterson

Technical Credits
Hilary Brougher Director,Screenwriter
Nicole Arbusto Casting
Sean Costello Producer
Doug Dey Executive Producer
Joy Dickson Casting
Lynette Howell Producer
Judy Karp Sound/Sound Designer
Samara Koffler Producer
Kurt & Bart Costumes/Costume Designer
Terry Leonard Co-producer
Sharon Lomofsky Production Designer
David Mansfield Score Composer
David Morrison Cinematographer
Tom Paul Set Decoration/Design,Sound/Sound Designer
Keith Reamer Editor
Liz Regan Musical Direction/Supervision
Jen Roskind Producer
Tilda Swinton Executive Producer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Stephanie Daley
1. Where Is the Door? [3:42]
2. You Think She Knew? [4:04]
3. Last Summer [4:30]
4. I'm Not That Shy [3:29]
5. The Party [8:55]
6. Close Your Eyes [6:54]
7. After School [5:45]
8. Believe [5:25]
9. Are You Coming Home? [4:29]
10. Is That a Sign? [6:43]
11. You Tell Me [4:22]
12. Who's That Boy? [6:37]
13. Ski Trip [6:27]
14. I Think We Are Done Here [1:17]
15. Being Afraid [2:10]
16. I Want This Baby [4:16]
17. Heartbeat [5:42]
18. I Told Her to Die [7:00]

Videos

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Stephanie Daley 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Writer/Director Hilary Brougher has created a deeply involving and moving masterwork of film with her little independent low budget STEPHANIE DALEY. Brougher has courage to address an issue most people wish to submerge - that of unwanted teenage pregnancies and their consequences - and she does it in the form of a story that is so well woven and presented with such fine actors that she not only succeeds in bringing attention to her main topic, she also introduces us to two women whose lives, though separated by years of age, are significantly parallel. The result is a film that lingers in the mind long after the closing credits. Stephanie Daley (Amber Tamblyn) is a 16-year-old girl, shy, introverted and on the periphery of the social scene at high school until she meets a boy with whom she has consensual sex. The focus of her life changes as she grows in girth and at one dramatic point she gives birth to a fetus inside a bathroom stall which she secretly discards: no one knows Stephanie's secret. When she is examined, she is told she was pregnant, a fact which she denies. A forensic psychologist Lydie Crane (Tilda Swinton), pregnant herself, is brought into the case to examine Stephanie and help the court decide the truth about what happened. As Stephanie opens up to Lydie, Lydie begins to acknowledge her own conflicts about her current pregnancy with her husband Paul (Timothy Hutton): their first pregnancy resulted in a stillbirth and the current pregnancy began three months after that unresolved tragedy. When Lydie is not at her job she faces a world of people including a friend Frank (Denis O'Hare) who make her consider her own concepts of right and wrong. Lydie and Stephanie work together on the concept that 'the truth is what we believe'. How these two women reach the conclusions they do is the part of the story that is best left unshared until the viewer experiences it alone. The cast is so fine that to single out one would be a disservice to the ensemble effect director Brougher has achieved. Tilda Swinton continues to finesse her extraordinary gifts as an actress and the young Amber Tamblyn makes a significant stride for her career. There is a small role for fine character actress Novella Nelson as Doctor Lynn that is a remarkable achievement. This is a film with a tough subject matter, handled with the utmost dignity, and makes a social statement while glowing as a superb independent film. Highly recommended. Grady Harp