Sunday in New York

( 3 )

Overview

Playwright Norman Krasna adapted his hit Broadway sex farce for the screen under the direction of Peter Tewksbury. Adam Tyler Cliff Robertson is an airline pilot who rents a pricey Manhattan apartment and has the weekend off. His prim sister Eileen Jane Fonda, shows up to visit, complaining that her fiancée Russ Robert Culp, is pressuring her to have premarital sex, threatening to break up their engagement if she doesn't comply. Adam tells his sister that she is right to resist, that men want to marry women who ...
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Overview

Playwright Norman Krasna adapted his hit Broadway sex farce for the screen under the direction of Peter Tewksbury. Adam Tyler Cliff Robertson is an airline pilot who rents a pricey Manhattan apartment and has the weekend off. His prim sister Eileen Jane Fonda, shows up to visit, complaining that her fiancée Russ Robert Culp, is pressuring her to have premarital sex, threatening to break up their engagement if she doesn't comply. Adam tells his sister that she is right to resist, that men want to marry women who are virgins, then he leaves with plans to meet his lover, Mona Harris Jo Morrow, in another city. Left alone, Eileen finds women's lingerie in her brother's closet and realizes that he has a double standard. She leaves, upset. While on a bus, she meets a man named Mike Rod Taylor. They spend the day sightseeing, fall in love, and return to the apartment after a rainstorm drenches their clothes. Russ and Adam later arrive at the apartment at different intervals. Russ mistakenly believes that Eileen has cheated on him, so he storms out, leaving Eileen with her new love and Adam with plans to marry Jo. Jim Backus has a minor role as a flight dispatcher. Musician Peter Nero, who scored the film, appears in a cameo. ~ Michael Betzold
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Sunday in New York is a rather routine early '60s sex comedy, albeit one that's a bit more frank than others of the period. Norman Krasna's screenplay deals quite openly with the issue of sex among singles: the double standard with the issue where men and women are concerned and the pressures that a young woman faced at the time. The openness is refreshing, even if many of the ideas are dated. Had Krasna provided sharper and funnier dialogue, Sunday might have ended up as a rather superior example of the genre, but here the writer lets the viewer down. Yes, there are amusing moments, but they tend to generate chuckles rather than real laughs. Peter Tewksbury's direction doesn't help; it's genial and professional, when what is needed is real imagination to kick things into high gear. This becomes especially clear in the last third of the screenplay, when the machinations that are part and parcel of the genre have set up a mistaken identity plot that should be much more amusing than it is. Don't blame the cast, for they give it their all. Rod Taylor is a bit stiff in places but fine, and Jane Fonda is quite good throughout. Cliff Robertson does very well, and in what could be described as the "Gig Young" role, Robert Culp boosts the energy level considerably. None of this -- nor Peter Nero's cool, jazzy score -- raises Sunday above the ordinary, but it does make it an enjoyable piece of fluff.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/8/2011
  • UPC: 883316288849
  • Original Release: 1963
  • Source: Warner Archives
  • Presentation: Remastered
  • Time: 1:45:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 12,886

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Rod Taylor Mike Mitchell
Jane Fonda Eileen Tyler
Cliff Robertson Adam Tyler
Robert Culp Russ Wilson
Jim Backus Flight Dispatcher
Jo Morrow Mona Harris
Peter Nero Himself
Technical Credits
Peter Tewksbury Director
Robert Armbruster Musical Direction/Supervision
Edward C. Carfagno Art Director
Carroll Coates Songwriter
George W. Davis Art Director
Roland Everett Songwriter
Everett Freeman Producer
Henry W. Grace Set Decoration/Design
Norman Krasna Screenwriter
George R. Nelson Set Decoration/Design
Peter Nero Score Composer, Songwriter
Orry-Kelly Costumes/Costume Designer
Franz Steininger Editor
Frederic Steinkamp Editor
Leo Tover Cinematographer
John Truwe Makeup
William J. Tuttle Makeup
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

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3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 17, 2011

    Love this movie. Rod Taylor has always been a favorite of mine.

    I was thinking the same thing. The details in the movie description are a little backwards. It's a movie worth watching!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2002

    The critic is wrong about the details - but I love this film!

    Michael Betzhold is wrong about some of the details on his movie review. It makes me wonder if he really watched it or just skimmed over it. Eileen does leave her brother's apt - but to go sightseeing in NY. While there, she meets Mike on the bus, and when she returns to the apt with both of them soaked from the rain - she discovers the lingerie in the closet. THEN, she is angry with her brother's double standard. This fuels her already strong attraction to Mike, and they begin to make love. Later Mike is strongly protesting that since she is a virgin that HE will not be the one to change that. She is explaining, while her fiance walks in and sees them half dressed. The fiance assumes Mike is her brother Adam and asks Eileen to marry him. Caught and surprised they don't tell him the truth and concoct a plan to explain at dinner.......All of the confusion is pretty funny when her real brother Adam walks in, and the fiance is told that Adam is a friend Mike, Adam's reaction when he assumes what must have happended is pretty funny, and the fiance finds out later. But it has one of those classic happy endings, which I love no matter what critics say. Also the music by Peter Nero is plus! One of my FAVORITE films!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews