Sunshine

Sunshine

4.4 13
Director: Danny Boyle

Cast: Cillian Murphy, Chris Evans, Rose Byrne

     
 

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As the sun begins to dim along with humankind's hope for the future, it's up to a desperate crew of eight astronauts to reach the dying star and reignite the fire that will bring life back to planet Earth in this tense psychological sci-fi thriller that re-teams 28 Days Later director Danny Boyle with…  See more details below

Overview

As the sun begins to dim along with humankind's hope for the future, it's up to a desperate crew of eight astronauts to reach the dying star and reignite the fire that will bring life back to planet Earth in this tense psychological sci-fi thriller that re-teams 28 Days Later director Danny Boyle with writer Alex Garland and producer Andrew Macdonald. The skies are darkening, and the outlook for planet Earth is grim. Though the encroaching darkness at first seems unstoppable, scientists have concocted one desperate last-ditch plan to buy the human race a temporary reprieve from the grim future that looms just past the horizon. A crew of eight men and women has been given a nuclear device designed to literally reignite the sun and sent hurtling through infinity on the most crucial space mission ever attempted. Suddenly, as the crew loses radio contact with mission control, everything begins to fall apart. Now, in the farthest reaches of the galaxy, the men and women who may hold the key to ultimate survival find themselves not only struggling for their lives, but their sanity as well. Rose Byrne, Chris Evans, Cillian Murphy, and Michelle Yeoh star in a film that asks audiences just what would become of humankind if the sky suddenly went black.

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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jason Buchanan
In 28 Days Later, writer Alex Garland and director Danny Boyle teamed to detail the fall of humanity on planet Earth; five years later, they've come together once again to follow the fight for it in outer space. The result is a high-concept psychological sci-fi thriller that effectively builds tension in a variety of ways, despite falling back on the occasional cliché and nearly careening out of control during its heliocentric climax. As with most ambitious genre efforts, there are flaws to be found for those seeking to deconstruct rather than simply be taken in by the film, yet while many filmmakers seem eager to simply exploit advancements in special effects by cramming the frame with as many fantastic extraterrestrials and cool space explosions as possible, Garland and Boyle seem intent on telling a story first and foremost, and actually using special effects to advance that story. Once upon a time, before Aliens inspired every sci-fi filmmaker to focus on action over plot, sci-fi was a genre driven by ideas. Sunshine harkens back to that era of sci-fi filmmaking. Of course, even then, not every concept or idea set forth was always entirely original, and the same can be said for Sunshine. Fans of Paul W.S. Anderson's Event Horizon in particular may cry foul over the apparent recycling of some plot points and ideas from that flawed but commendable effort (indeed Sunshine could be seen as the anti-Event Horizon), but where Garland and Boyle's artistry as filmmakers comes into play is how they fold those concepts into their own unique creation -- much the same way that they drew from George A. Romero's universe to create 28 Days Later. Visually, Sunshine is quite a sight to behold, thanks to cinematographer Alwin Küchler -- who has previously worked with director Lynne Ramsay on The Ratcatcher and Morvern Callar, among others. Though generally confined to terra firma for his cinematic excursions, Küchler proves exceptionally adept at sci-fi imagery due in large part to his remarkable use of light. In a story which revolves around the sun, the use of light is paramount, and the manner in which Küchler distorts and bends it in the frame is truly remarkable. Küchler's unique methods of visualizing each act of the film serve extremely well to both emphasize the psychological distress of the characters and skillfully maintain the mystery of one key player. The cast -- an impressive mix of international talents -- all stay true to form throughout despite the fact that they are given little background or true character traits. While it would have been nice to see the characters played by Michelle Yeoh, Hiroyuki Sanada, and Rose Byrne (of 28 Weeks Later) get a bit more depth, this is a story-driven tale and, in the end, the players involved are merely elements of a larger beast -- their backgrounds on Earth rendered largely inessential given that viewers will eventually become savvy to their true natures as the situation in space grows increasingly dire. As with his part in 28 Days Later, Cillian Murphy makes an impressive lead protagonist, his clashes with Chris Evans' temperamental space traveler providing some of Sunshine's most memorable -- and at times humorous -- moments.

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Product Details

Release Date:
01/08/2008
UPC:
0024543485537
Original Release:
2007
Rating:
R
Source:
Fox Searchlight
Region Code:
A
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[DTS 5.1-Channel Surround Sound, Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
1:47:00
Sales rank:
5,338

Special Features

Deleted scenes with optional commentary by Danny Boyle ; Web production diaries; 2 short films with introduction by Danny Boyle; Commentary by director Danny Boyle; Commentary by Dr. Brian Cox, University of Manchester; Enhanced viewing mode with the filmmakers of Sunshine; Journey Into Sound - surround sound enhancement; Theatrical trailer in high definition

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Cillian Murphy Capa
Chris Evans Mace
Rose Byrne Cassie
Michelle Yeoh Corazon
Hiroyuki Sanada Kaneda
Cliff Curtis Searle
Troy Garity Harvey
Benedict Wong Trey
Mark Strong Pinbacker
Chipo Chung Icarus
Paloma Baeza Capa's Sister
Archie Macdonald Child
Sylvie MacDonald Child

Technical Credits
Danny Boyle Director
Bernard Bellew Co-producer
Christine Blundell Makeup
Richard Conway Special Effects Supervisor
Mark Coulier Makeup
Tim Fraser Sound/Sound Designer
Garry Freeman Art Director
Glenn Freemantle Sound/Sound Designer
Alex Garland Screenwriter
Chris Gill Editor
John Hayward Sound/Sound Designer
Donna Isaacson Casting
Alwin Küchler Cinematographer
Suttirat Anne Larlarb Costumes/Costume Designer
Andrew Macdonald Producer
Stephen Morahan Art Director
John Murphy Score Composer
Tom Sayers Sound/Sound Designer
Dennis Schnegg Art Director
Gail Stevens Casting
Richard Styles Asst. Director
Mark Tildesley Production Designer
Underworld Score Composer

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Sunshine 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Apart from an actual review and/or recommendation, I think it's important to note what lengths the actors went through in order to play their respective roles. If memory serves me correct, the cast spent a good 15 months living together as a form of method acting. The idea behind it was for the cast to get in the right mindframe and really feel as if they had been together for the full seven years it took to get to the Sun. Quite a fascinating backstory and entirely worth looking in to if you enjoyed the film.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Without a doubt one of the best Sci-fi that I've seen in awhile. Not over the top with the special effects (which EVERYONE wants to do now). I especially loved the soundtrack, but can't seem to find it. You gotta see this movie!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This movie left me on the edge of my seat until the very end. The special effects were amazing for a movie that did not make it to theatres. The acting was great. The shots were creative and left you wanting more!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one movie that will keep you at the edge of your seats - I know it did me. After watching it for the first time in the movie theater, it left me with a great impression where I pondered upon the concept of the sun dying and how humanity would cope. Eight lives sacrificed for the conservation of humanity. My opinion is that the movie was well written and well produced. Danny Boyle did a fantastic job in directing and in not attempting into overblowing the main subject, and not adding additional subplots to confuse the issue. He maintained as much realism into the movie. Granted that it would take thousands, or even millions, of nuclear bombs to denotate a dying star, the main purpose of this movie is to showcase the human drama at its best.
Dierckx More than 1 year ago
In the nearby future - 2057 to be precisely - the sun is dying. The only hope for mankind to survive is to ignite a gigantic atom-bomb in the core of the sun in order to rekindle her energy. The Icarus II is on her way to the sun to deliver her payload. A few of the key-role players are Dr. Searle, a psychologist played by Cliff Curtis, Dr. Capa, a brilliant thirty year old physicist played by Cillian Murphy and the excellent Benedict Wong in the role of Dr. Trey the brilliant mathematician but responsible for huge problems with the Icarus II. John Murphy and Underworld are responsible for the excellent and quiet electric guitar music. The first thirty minutes are slow paced and maybe a little tedious, with an emphasis on brilliant special effects (one of the strongest points of this movie.) But after that the tension and drama are gradually build up to the dramatic end sequence. It's one of the best SF-movies I ever saw. It can compete with "Space-Odyssey 2001", "Solaris", and "Alien". For those who want more background information about the meaning of several scenes in the film, and are interested in astronomy and astrophysics, I would strongly suggest to play the movie a second time with the audio-commentary by the English physicist Dr. Brian Cox of the University of Manchester.
bren57 More than 1 year ago
I have watched this several times and love it. Cillian Murphy's performance if unforgettable as Capa. You won't be disappointed.
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Hugo-Z-Hackenbush More than 1 year ago
Unlike most of my fellow reviewers, I can't recommend this film. The cast certainly did well, although they were a little to "pretty" to be taken seriously. Sure I can stare dreamily at Chris Evans, even with his shirt on, as long as the next guy, but is he up to jump starting the Sun? There were three main problems with the execution; firstly, the CGI was excellent, although this was ruined by a great deal of fuzzy camera work due to the excessive eye squinting sunshine. Secondly a predictable, though also blurry villain, with a predictable ending. Thirdly, this movie falls apart a little over halfway through, which is unfortunate, because the first half shows promise. Sunshine was a good idea, that just didn't see the light.