×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Take My Eyes
     

Take My Eyes

5.0 1
Director: Icíar Bollaín

Cast: Laia Marull, Luis Tosar, Candela Peña

 
Spanish actress/author/filmmaker Icíar Bollaín writes and directs the family drama Te Doy Mis Ojos (Take My Eyes), co-written by Alicia Luna. Pilar (Laia Marull) leaves her abusive husband, Antonio (Luis Tosar), during the middle of winter in Toledo, Spain. She and her son, Juan (Nicolás Fernández Luna), go to live with her sister Ana (Candela Peña).

Overview

Spanish actress/author/filmmaker Icíar Bollaín writes and directs the family drama Te Doy Mis Ojos (Take My Eyes), co-written by Alicia Luna. Pilar (Laia Marull) leaves her abusive husband, Antonio (Luis Tosar), during the middle of winter in Toledo, Spain. She and her son, Juan (Nicolás Fernández Luna), go to live with her sister Ana (Candela Peña). While supportive, Ana doesn't fully understand Pilar's situation. Pilar's mother, Aurora (Rosa María Sardà), refuses to acknowledge the problem. Antonio is desperate to win back Pilar. He sends her constant presents and even attends therapy sessions in order to work through his anger. Meanwhile, Pilar gets a job at an art museum and tries to restart her life. Take My Eyes won several awards at the San Sebastian Film Festival before making its U.S. premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in 2004.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/07/2006
UPC:
0717119959647
Original Release:
2003
Rating:
NR
Source:
New Yorker Video
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital Stereo]
Time:
1:46:00

Special Features

Featurette: A Loce That Kills; Theatrical trailer; Scene selections; Enhanced for 16x9 tv's ; Optional English Subtitles

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Laia Marull Pilar
Luis Tosar Antonio
Candela Peña Ana
Rosa María Sardà Aurora
Nicolas Fernandez Luna Juan
Kiti Manver Actor
Sergi Calleja Actor

Technical Credits
Icíar Bollaín Director,Screenwriter
Santiago Garcia de Leaniz Executive Producer
Carles Gusi Cinematographer
Pelayo Gutierrez Sound/Sound Designer
Pizca Gutierrez Production Manager
Alberto Iglesias Score Composer
Alicia Luna Screenwriter
Enrique Gonzalez Macho Associate Producer
Estibaliz Markiegi Costumes/Costume Designer
Victor Molero Art Director
Alfonso Pino Sound/Sound Designer
Ana Ribacoba Makeup
Eva Valiño Sound/Sound Designer
Angel Hernandez Zoido Editor

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Take My Eyes
1. My Slippers [3:31]
2. My Sister's Things [2:19]
3. A Little While [1:17]
4. Open the Door [3:28]
5. Any Old Thing [4:12]
6. Works? [1:21]
7. Two Parts [2:21]
8. Not My Scene [2:33]
9. One of Those Nights [2:43]
10. Reason [1:37]
11. He's Marvelous! [1:13]
12. Writing to a Friend [2:00]
13. Birthday Party [3:37]
14. I Remember Everything [1:37]
15. What Do You Miss? [1:46]
16. Screw Everything? [4:57]
17. All of It! [3:46]
18. More Settled [1:28]
19. Husband and Wife [4:58]
20. Things to Tell You [1:43]
21. A Sort of Tour [1:31]
22. The Land of the Living [2:30]
23. An Architect? [1:23]
24. What Are You Thinking? [1:52]
25. Better Now? [2:49]
26. Where He Wants Her [2:07]
27. Don't Turn It Off [1:37]
28. A Normal Marriage [2:17]
29. Body and Soul [2:24]
30. Are You There? [3:15]
31. I Saw You [2:28]
32. Listening to Paintings [1:01]
33. Just Leave [3:09]
34. Your Only Regret [2:18]
35. What Turns You On [4:33]
36. He Lives There [1:54]
37. I'll Kill Myself [2:32]
38. One of Your Kind [:58]
39. Who Am I? [2:28]
40. Is That Everything? [6:19]

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Take My Eyes 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
TE DOY MIS OJOS (Take My Eyes) is a blisteringly real examination of spousal abuse - the etiology, the mechanisms, the concept of co-dependency, and the high rate of recidivism - all bound together in a brilliant screenplay by Alicia Luna and director Icíar Bollaín. It won many Goyas (read Oscars) in Spain and for good reason: this is a powerful film about an indelicate subject from a country (Spain) not usually comfortable discussing much less film such issues. Pilar (Laia Marull) and her son Juan (Nicolás Fernández Luna) live in a small apartment with husband/father Antonio (Luis Tosar), a small section of hell where daily Antonio abuses Pilar with an uncontrollable anger. Pilar and Juan leave one night to live with Pilar's soon to be married sister Ana (Candela Peña) and fiance, a Scotsman John (David Mooney). Ana encourages Pilar to divorce the abusive Antonio but Pilar is frightened, fearing she has no means of support and admitting that there are parts of Antonio she still loves. Complicating Pilar's thinking is her mother Aurora (the fine Rosa Maria Sardà) who tries to underplay the problem by insisting that all marriages have their little problems! Antonio stalks Pilar, pleading for her to return, but every encounter results in a flair-up of Antonio's abusive behavior. Pilar finds a menial job at the museum in Toledo, a position she loves and soon is training to become a guide, loving speaking tot he public about art. Antonio agrees to seek help for his behavioral problems and enters group therapy and private therapy (Sergi Calleja) and begins bringing flowers and gifts and constant attention to Ana, hoping to have her return home. And return Ana does, with Juan, and with some newfound sense of self worth form her position at the museum. But as soon as Ana is 'home' a horrifying incident occurs and she gathers the strength to see the relationship clearly and respond correctly. The cast of actors is brilliant, the pacing of the film keeps the viewer on seat's edge, the cinematography by Carles Gusi captures the magic of Toledo, Spain, the musical score by Alberto Iglesias is first rate classical writing, and the amount of information about a little understood problem is an additional reward that accompanies this superb film. The film is in Spanish with English subtitles and the DVD adds a featurette that further examines a treatment center for abusive men feels like a much needed public service ploy. This is one of those films that would be easy to ignore because of the subject matter, but that is a real reason to view it - in addition to the fact that it is such a fine work of art. Grady Harp