BN.com Gift Guide

Take Shelter

( 3 )

Overview

An Ohio family man experiences a series of disturbing visions that gradually begin to weigh on his marriage and community when he begins obsessively constructing a heavily fortified storm shelter. Curtis LaForche Michael Shannon has a good life. He lives in a beautiful house with his loving wife, Samantha Jessica Chastain, and their deaf six-year-old daughter, Hannah Tova Stewart, but begins to sense that something ominous is on the horizon when the dark clouds of swelling storms begin invading his dreams. ...
See more details below
DVD (Wide Screen)
$11.99
BN.com price
(Save 40%)$19.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (8) from $14.10   
  • New (6) from $14.10   
  • Used (2) from $23.30   

Overview

An Ohio family man experiences a series of disturbing visions that gradually begin to weigh on his marriage and community when he begins obsessively constructing a heavily fortified storm shelter. Curtis LaForche Michael Shannon has a good life. He lives in a beautiful house with his loving wife, Samantha Jessica Chastain, and their deaf six-year-old daughter, Hannah Tova Stewart, but begins to sense that something ominous is on the horizon when the dark clouds of swelling storms begin invading his dreams. Taciturn, Curtis refuses to discuss the dreams with anyone, but feels compelled to dig out a massive storm shelter with the help of a good friend Shea Whigham. Meanwhile, as Samantha grows increasingly concerned with Curtis' erratic behavior, the local rumor mill begins to churn. Are Curtis' dreams a prophetic omen of things to come, or is he perhaps headed down the same dark road as his mother, who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia when she was approximately the same age that he is now?
Read More Show Less

Special Features

Deleted Scenes; Commentary with Jeff Nichols & Michael Shannon; Behind the Scenes of Take Shelter; Q&A with Michael Shannon & Shea Whigham
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jason Buchanan
Mental illness can be an incredibly difficult subject matter to portray in film; even if the screenplay is written with sincerity and a genuine sense of authenticity, a poor performance or misguided directorial choices can easily taint the whole endeavor. In Take Shelter, writer/director Jeff Nichols presents a sensitive and extraordinarily expressive profile of a hardworking family man contending with the slow onset of schizophrenia. With the talented Michael Shannon in the lead and a screenplay that allows the audience inside his character's head as his mental deterioration progresses, the viewer can't help but get emotionally involved. Curtis LaForche Michael Shannon has a good life. He lives in a beautiful house with his loving wife, Samantha Jessica Chastain, and their deaf six-year-old daughter, Hannah Tova Stewart, but he begins to sense that something ominous is on the horizon when the dark clouds of swelling storms begin invading his dreams. The taciturn Curtis refuses to discuss the dreams with anyone, but he feels compelled to dig out a massive storm shelter with the help of his good friend Dewart Shea Whigham. Meanwhile, as Samantha grows increasingly concerned with Curtis' erratic behavior, the local rumor mill begins to churn. Are Curtis' dreams an omen of things to come, or is he perhaps headed down the same dark road as his mother, who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia when she was approximately the same age that he is now? With a filmography that reads like the inmate list at a small psych ward, Take Shelter star Shannon has excelled at portraying deeply disturbed characters in movies such as Bug and Revolutionary Road. Here, Shannon infuses Curtis LaForche's increasing instability with a sense of desperation that makes it impossible for the viewer not to sympathize as he becomes a pariah at his job, in his community, and -- most painfully of all -- in his own home. Curtis is a man whose body exists in the real world, while his mind is being sucked helplessly into a darker mirror image of reality where his loved ones have turned malevolent and Mother Nature has decided to strike back against mankind. Shannon's quietly intense performance conveys the anguish of such an agonizing experience in a way that never feels exploitive or overplayed. He's simply a man who seeks to protect his family, but can't realize that he may be the biggest threat of all. A powerful scene in which Curtis nervously visits his schizophrenic mother in an assisted-care facility not only says quite a bit about the protagonist's character -- he remains dutifully composed while his fate becomes frighteningly clear -- but also about writer Nichols' talent as a screenwriter who recognizes the power of minimalism. Meanwhile, as a director, Nichols creates such an intense aura of dread and impending apocalypse during the visions that when Curtis simply describes one that is not shown in the film, we shudder at the mental image it paints. Curtis' wife Samantha is without question the character in the film who bears the most of his mental breakdown, and actress Jessica Chastain beautifully conveys the conflicting fear, anger, and concern that goes along with watching her husband's painful deterioration. Likewise, rising actor Whigham continues his winning streak of colorful supporting characters; in films such as Machete and Barry Munday, Whigham has displayed a penchant for the cartoonish, but by toning it down in Take Shelter, the talented supporting player displays a flair for drama that has been conspicuously absent from many of his higher profile roles. Despite the surreal flourishes on display during Curtis' dreams and hallucinations, Take Shelter unfolds in a straightforward manner that is only betrayed in the film's final scene -- a tantalizingly abstract coda that seems to be more figurative than literal. And while some may question Nichols' decision to abruptly depart from his realistic approach so late in the game, the ending is intriguing more for what it doesn't show, rather than for what it does.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/14/2012
  • UPC: 043396394971
  • Original Release: 2011
  • Rating:

  • Source: Sony Pictures
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Wide Screen
  • Sound: Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound
  • Language: English
  • Time: 2:01:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 4,517

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Michael Shannon Curtis, Curtis LaForche
Jessica Chastain Samantha
Tova Stewart Hannah
Shea Whigham Dewart
Kathy Baker , Sarah
Katy Mixon Nat,
Natasha Randall Cammie
Ron Kennard Russell
Scott Knisley Lewis
Robert Longstreet Jim
Heather Caldwell Special Ed Teacher
Ray McKinnon , Kyle
Lisa Gay Hamilton , Kendra
Sheila Hullihen Woman in Road
John Kloock Man in Road
Maryanna Alacchi Bargain Hunter
Jacque Jovic News Anchor
Bob Maines Walter Jacobs
Charles Moore Man at Window
Pete Ferry Melvin
Molly McGinnis Janine
Angie Marino-Smith Kathryn
Isabelle Smith Sue
Tina Stump Nurse
Ken Strunk Doctor Shannan
Maryann Nagel Insurance Agent
Hailee Dickens Pharmacist
Guy Van Swearingen Myers
William Alexander EMT
Joanna Tyler Attendant
Stuart Greer Army-Navy Dave
Jake Lockwood Andy
Kim Hendrickson Customer
Bart Flynn Dave
Nick Koesters Rich
Jeffrey Grover Psychiatrist
Technical Credits
Jeff Nichols Director, Screenwriter
Joshua Chase Sound/Sound Designer
David Wingo Score Composer
Tyler Davidson Producer
Will E. Files Sound/Sound Designer
Sarah Green Executive Producer
Parke Gregg Editor
Lyman Hardy Sound/Sound Designer
Timothy Johnson Asst. Director
Brian Kavanaugh-Jones Executive Producer
Chad Keith Production Designer
Jennifer Klide Art Director
Christos V. Konstantakopoulos Executive Producer
Sophia Lin Producer
Karen Malecki Costumes/Costume Designer, Editor
Chris Perot Executive Producer
Ryan Putz Sound Mixer
Richard Rothfeld Executive Producer
Robert Ruggeri Co-producer
Adam Stone Cinematographer
Greg Strause Executive Producer
Colin Strause Executive Producer
Adam Wilkins Co-producer
Read More Show Less

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Take Shelter
1. Scene 1 [6:43]
2. Scene 2 [8:02]
3. Scene 3 [6:14]
4. Scene 4 [8:06]
5. Scene 5 [6:23]
6. Scene 6 [7:39]
7. Scene 7 [5:53]
8. Scene 8 [8:15]
9. Scene 9 [4:45]
10. Scene 10 [7:06]
11. Scene 11 [8:46]
12. Scene 12 [5:37]
13. Scene 13 [1:18]
14. Scene 14 [9:17]
15. Scene 15 [8:25]
16. Scene 16 [8:11]
Read More Show Less

Menu

Disc #1 -- Take Shelter
   Play Movie
   Subtitles
      English
      English SDH
      French
      Subtitles: Off
   Scene Selections
   Special Features
      Commentary With Jeff Nichols & Michael Shannon: On/Off
      Behind The Scenes Of Take Shelter
      Q&A With Michael Shannon & Shea Whigwham
      Deleted Scenes
         Play All
            Second Counselor Session
            Picnic Table
      Theatrical Trailer
   Previews
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 25, 2012

    Simply brilliant

    Michael Shannon delivers an outstanding performance as Curtis, a working class Midwesterner overcome by a disturbing, foreboding sense of impending doom in “Take Shelter,” a menacingly brilliant film in which every scene intensifies the mounting tension of Curtis’ life. As horrific dreams disturb Curtis, we witness his devoted wife Samantha (played, in another astounding performance, by Jessica Chastain, who seems to be cornering the market on suffering middle-class wife roles) desperately trying to maintain some sense of normality in their lives by selling her wares at a swap meet and taking care of their young deaf daughter. Curtis witnesses coming storms that only he seems to see. He begins exhibiting bizarre behavior that threatens his relationship with his wife, jeopardizes his job, and undermines his credibility in the community. Writer-director Jeff Nichols masterfully weaves a complex tale of one man’s apparent mental collapse and its consequences on those around him—but strong undercurrents of uncertainty permeate throughout this film. Is Curtis really losing his mind? Are his visions and dreams really omens of what is to come? Never before have I rooted so hard for a character’s sanity. The tension mounts to an almost unbearable climax—only to yield to a truly remarkable final scene. See this movie—it is a powerful and majestic work of cinematic art.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews