Tekkonkinkreet

Tekkonkinkreet

4.8 6
Director: Himaki Ando, Hiroaki Ando, Michael Arias

Cast: Himaki Ando, Hiroaki Ando, Michael Arias, Min Tanaka

     
 

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A pair of feisty young street urchins attempts to protect an unnamed metropolis from a diabolical villain whose plans to raze the urban landscape on the behalf of malevolent real-estate developers threatens to destroy the very soul of the city. Street-smart youngsters Black and White do their best to defend their territory from rival gangs as local yakuza leader

Overview

A pair of feisty young street urchins attempts to protect an unnamed metropolis from a diabolical villain whose plans to raze the urban landscape on the behalf of malevolent real-estate developers threatens to destroy the very soul of the city. Street-smart youngsters Black and White do their best to defend their territory from rival gangs as local yakuza leader Suzuki, fearing that the town has lost its zeal, plots a triumphant return to form. A lifelong criminal with a serious zodiac fixation, Suzuki (aqua The Rat) doesn't want to corrupt the city as much as he simply wants reinvigorate it with the kind of vibrancy that drew him to love it in the first place. Mr. Snake, on the other hand, wants nothing more than to profit as the buildings of the city crumble to make room for the massive amusement park planned by his wealthy clients. The only problem now is that Mr. Snake can't carry out his destructive deed while Black and White are still wandering the streets - of course that's nothing that can't be solved by a pair of sharp-shooting intergalactic assassins whose bullets always meet their mark. A metaphysical tale of survival in a city that seems to be poised on the brink of disaster, Tekkonkinkreet marks the feature directorial debut of longtime visual effects artist Michael Arias (The Abyss, Princess Mononoke).

Product Details

Release Date:
09/25/2007
UPC:
0043396195226
Original Release:
2007
Rating:
R
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
A
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
1:51:00

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Min Tanaka Suzuki
Yoshinori Okada Vanilla
Nao Omori Chocolo
Masahiro Motoki Hebi
Yusuke Iseya Kimura
Kankuro Kudo Sawada
Yu Aoi Siro
Kazunari Ninomiya Kuro
Morisanchuu Voice Only

Technical Credits
Himaki Ando Director
Hiroaki Ando Director
Michael Arias Director
Asian Kung-Fu Generation Score Composer
Eiichi Kamagata Producer
Osamu Kamei Executive Producer
Shinji Kimura Art Director
Naoki Kitagawa Executive Producer
Masahiko Kubo Animator
Taiyo Matsumoto Original Story
Shojiro Nishimi Animator
Mitch Osias Sound/Sound Designer
Plaid Score Composer
Yasushi Shiina Executive Producer
Yasushi Shina Executive Producer
Mutsumi Takemiya Editor
Eiko Tanaka Executive Producer
Masao Teshima Producer
Osamu Teshima Executive Producer
Ayako Ueda Producer
Chie Uratani Animator
Anthony Weintraub Screenwriter

Scene Index

The making of Tekkonkinkreet - director Michael Arias' 300 day diary; A conversation with director Michael Arias and British music duo Plaid ; Filmmaker commentary

Videos

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Tekkonkinkreet 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LeeLeeACG More than 1 year ago
This mind blowing work of art is the most amazing journey I have ever had in an anime!
Sleighbell More than 1 year ago
*Note: I watched this film in the Japanese dialogue with English Subtitles. I really hate dubbing. This movie took me exceedingly by surprise. Knowing it was done by the graphic designers behind the Animatrix, I was expecting noteworthy graphics, but had lesser expectations for a plot, nor did I predict even a faint trace of such strong themes and depth that would soon grace the screen. Tekkonkinkreet tells the story of two orphan boys, Kuro and Shiro (Japanese for Black and White), who have grown up together in the harsh and villainous, gang-ridden and corrupt Treasure Town. The two are inseparable, literally. As the sweet, naive little Shiro puts it when advocating an maddened, violent and delusional Kuro (now -separate- from him), "Kuro may have a screw loose here and there. But Shiro has all the screws needed." Yes, he refers to himself in the third person. Outside of them, other stories mingle with their own, such as the fall of the lead Yakuza gang to a mysterious business-oriented newcomer looking to make Treasure Town more capitalist, and the ever-growing rumors of a character called the minotaur, both of which tie the climax of the film together brilliantly. The film is also visually astounding, almost three dimensional in its fast, wide-angled motions through the CGI Treasure Town. The camera cinematography reminds me alot of something Stanley Kubrick would do, had he gotten involved with this genre. The visuals are then paired very beautifully with a beautifully eclectic electronica soundtrack that blends into its surroundings with occasional circus music and distorted voices appearing here and there in the melodic synthesized tones, which change tempo and volume frequently to greatly affect the intensity of the scene. I highly recommend this movie for any occasion.
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