Apartment

Apartment

4.7 11
Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Billy Wilder, Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, Fred MacMurray

     
 

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Widely regarded as a comedy in 1960, The Apartment seems more melancholy with each passing year. Jack Lemmon plays C.C. Baxter, a go-getting office worker who loans his tiny apartment to his philandering superiors for their romantic trysts. He runs into trouble when he finds himself sharing a girlfriend (See more details below

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Overview

Widely regarded as a comedy in 1960, The Apartment seems more melancholy with each passing year. Jack Lemmon plays C.C. Baxter, a go-getting office worker who loans his tiny apartment to his philandering superiors for their romantic trysts. He runs into trouble when he finds himself sharing a girlfriend (Shirley MacLaine) with his callous boss (Fred MacMurray). Director/co-writer Billy Wilder claimed that the idea for The Apartment stemmed from a short scene in the 1945 romantic drama Brief Encounter in which the illicit lovers (Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson) arrange a rendezvous in a third person's apartment. Wilder was intrigued about what sort of person would willingly vacate his residence to allow virtual strangers a playing field for hanky panky. His answer to that question wound up winning 6 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Original Screenplay. The Apartment was adapted by Neil Simon and Burt Bacharach into the 1969 Broadway musical Promises, Promises.

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble
Billy Wilder always liked to thread a strong streak of cynicism through his comedies, and he rarely made a film with a darker undertow than The Apartment. The effervescent comic charm of Jack Lemmon and quirky beauty of Shirley MacLaine give the film a palatable sweetness (while she would be given more glamorous treatment in later films, MacLaine was never more adorable than she was here), but they sugarcoat a very bitter pill in what is ultimately a story about moral accountability (and the lack thereof) in American business. While the film starts off as a naughty-for-its-time sex comedy about sad sack C.C. Baxter (Lemmon) who discovers he can curry the favor of his many bosses by letting them use his apartment for romantic indiscretions, it takes a more serious turn when we get to know Fran Kubelik (MacLaine), an elevator operator with precious little self-esteem. While most of the women Baxter's superiors lure to the tiny den of seduction look like brassy bar girls who've been this route before and know what they're doing, Kubelik is at heart a sweet (if disappointed) girl who desperately wants to be loved and who has made the mistake of falling for the duplicitous J.D. Sheldrake (Fred MacMurray), whose callous indifference to the agony he inflicts falls just short of horrifying. (Anyone who grew up watching MacMurray on My Three Sons may be shocked to see how slimy he is in this role.) Ultimately, Baxter and Kubelik seem like two innocents stranded in a corrupt world, and what's most remarkable is not that they finally end up together, but that they both survive the experience intact and that Wilder is able to wring so many laughs out of a story that runs so close to tragedy. Mark Deming
All Movie Guide - Mark Deming
Billy Wilder always liked to thread a strong streak of cynicism through his comedies, and he rarely made a film with a darker undertow than The Apartment. The effervescent comic charm of Jack Lemmon and quirky beauty of Shirley MacLaine give the film a palatable sweetness (while she would be given more glamorous treatment in later films, MacLaine was never more adorable than she was here), but they sugarcoat a very bitter pill in what is ultimately a story about moral accountability (and the lack thereof) in American business. While the film starts off as a naughty-for-its-time sex comedy about sad sack C.C. Baxter (Lemmon) who discovers he can curry the favor of his many bosses by letting them use his apartment for romantic indiscretions, it takes a more serious turn when we get to know Fran Kubelik (MacLaine), an elevator operator with precious little self-esteem. While most of the women Baxter's superiors lure to the tiny den of seduction look like brassy bar girls who've been this route before and know what they're doing, Kubelik is at heart a sweet (if disappointed) girl who desperately wants to be loved and who has made the mistake of falling for the duplicitous J.D. Sheldrake (Fred MacMurray), whose callous indifference to the agony he inflicts falls just short of horrifying. (Anyone who grew up watching MacMurray on My Three Sons may be shocked to see how slimy he is in this role.) Ultimately, Baxter and Kubelik seem like two innocents stranded in a corrupt world, and what's most remarkable is not that they finally end up together, but that they both survive the experience intact -- and that Wilder is able to wring so many laughs out of a story that runs so close to tragedy.

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Product Details

Release Date:
02/05/2008
UPC:
0883904100805
Original Release:
1960
Rating:
NR
Source:
20Th Century Fox
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
2:05:00
Sales rank:
11,194

Special Features

Closed Caption; Audio commentary from Bruce Block - film producer and historian; Inside the Apartment documentary; Magic time: the art of Jack Lemmon

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jack Lemmon C.C. Baxter
Shirley MacLaine Fran Kubelik
Fred MacMurray J.D. Sheldrake
Ray Walston Mr. Joe Dobisch
Edie Adams Miss Olsen
David Lewis Mr. Al Kirkeby
Jack Kruschen Dr. Dreyfuss
Joan Shawlee Sylvia
Hope Holiday Margie MacDougall
Johnny Seven Karl Matuschka
Naomi Stevens Mrs. Dreyfuss
Joyce Jameson The Blonde
Willard Waterman Mr. Vanderhof
David White Mr. Eichelberger
Benny Burt Bartender
Frances Lax Mrs. Lieberman
Dorothy Abbott Office Worker
Hal Smith Santa Claus

Technical Credits
Billy Wilder Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Edward Boyle Set Decoration/Design
Adolph Deutsch Score Composer
I.A.L. Diamond Associate Producer,Screenwriter
Doane Harrison Associate Producer
Joseph La Shelle Cinematographer
Fred Lau Sound/Sound Designer
Dan Mandell Editor
Hal W. Polaire Asst. Director
Harry Ray Makeup
Milt Rice Special Effects
Alexandre Trauner Art Director
Allen K. Wood Production Manager

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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Apartment
1. Main Titles [1:31]
2. Killing Time [6:16]
3. TV Dinner [3:59]
4. Be My Guest [4:35]
5. Two and a Half Colds [2:10]
6. Scheduling Problems [7:12]
7. Why So Popular? [6:27]
8. All Sorts of Things [3:21]
9. Like Old Times [3:38]
10. Trust Me [2:54]
11. Selfish and Ungrateful [3:34]
12. Broken Mirror [7:08]
13. Drowning Their Sorrows [3:23]
14. A Million Laughs [6:08]
15. O-U-T [6:09]
16. Coffee and a Prayer [6:43]
17. Be a Mensch [2:37]
18. Person-to-Person [3:51]
19. So Ashamed [3:47]
20. Chicken Soup and Gin [7:27]
21. The Jackpot [3:21]
22. Lunch Date [4:26]
23. Out of Her System [3:52]
24. Brother-in-Law [1:33]
25. Footprint in the Sand [4:26]
26. A Kick in the Head [5:37]
27. All Washed Up [2:34]
28. Ring in the New [6:15]

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