Armstrong Lie

The Armstrong Lie

5.0 1
Director: Alex Gibney

Cast: Alex Gibney, Lance Armstrong, Reed Albergotti, Betsy Andreu

     
 

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Alex Gibney surveys the rise and fall of acclaimed and then disgraced American cyclist Lance Armstrong in his documentary The Armstrong Lie. The director presents the complicated history of the controversial figure, including his troubled father-free childhood, his battle back from testicular cancer, his seven consecutive Tour de France championships, the

Overview

Alex Gibney surveys the rise and fall of acclaimed and then disgraced American cyclist Lance Armstrong in his documentary The Armstrong Lie. The director presents the complicated history of the controversial figure, including his troubled father-free childhood, his battle back from testicular cancer, his seven consecutive Tour de France championships, the creation of his Live Strong charity, and his subsequent admission to a blood doping regimen that allowed him to stay at the top of the physically demanding sport for so long. Gibney sits down with numerous reporters who tried for years to expose Armstrong's continuous fibs, and also interviews those who were inside Armstrong's inner circle. The Armstrong Lie screened at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
Alex Gibney became one of the most celebrated documentary filmmakers of his era because of his skills as a journalist. Even his lesser movies do a first-rate job of amassing large amounts of information on a subject and presenting that research point by point so that a seemingly unknowable topic becomes crystal clear for his viewers. His ability to distill a news story into a clear narrative is on full display in The Armstrong Lie, a look at the rise and fall of disgraced bicycling champion Lance Armstrong. The project first began as a record of Armstrong's 2009 attempted comeback at the Tour de France (he had previously won the event seven times before retiring in 2005). However, the entire movie went in another direction as the truth about his cheating -- as well as his manipulative behavior towards teammates, journalists, and anyone who dared to question his inspiring if totally bogus sporting accomplishments -- finally became a matter of public record. There is little here about the scandal that hasn't been covered in detail in many other venues, but what Gibney does is bring everything together so that we get the big picture in one simple package. We learn about Armstrong's cockiness and confidence as a young cyclist, and that adds to our understanding of how he could live such a gigantic lie in public for more than a decade. The director also explains the mechanics of how he and his team were able to beat the supposedly strict blood tests administered by race officials. As with all of Gibney's films, you will probably feel smarter when it's over than you did beforehand. However, while you may have a clear understanding of the how, what, where, and why of this scandal and its exposure, the film leaves you wondering who the man at the center of this story is. Armstrong is still so self-protective, so unable to doubt himself or question his own actions and beliefs, that he fails spectacularly in his ham-fisted attempts at public apologies -- something underscored by the famous Oprah Winfrey interview, which appears in the documentary. Gibney's film paints Armstrong as something of a sociopath, who will use and manipulate and discard those around him without an ounce of regret. Because he does not appear capable of genuine contrition, or even self-reflection, the movie has no emotional impact. That's disappointing for a director whose best films combine excellent reporting and a multifaceted central figure. His Enron doc gave you an understanding of complex business fraud, along with the satisfaction of hating the people at the top of the company who were responsible for unleashing economic havoc. Additionally, his portrait of disgraced politician Eliot Spitzer threw back the curtain on dirty politics and revealed the fascinatingly complex and somewhat self-aware man who made it his mission to stop crime while being a regular client of hookers. The Armstrong Lie does such a fantastic job of presenting how awful Lance Armstrong is that, after a while, you really don't want to spend any more time with him -- even in the context of this very well-crafted movie.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/11/2014
UPC:
0043396433861
Original Release:
2013
Rating:
R
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
2:03:00
Sales rank:
46,450

Special Features

Commentary with Alex Gibney; Q&A with Alex Gibney, Frank Marshall, Bill Strickland, Jonathan Vaughters & Betsy Andreu; Deleted scenes

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Lance Armstrong Participant
Reed Albergotti Participant
Betsy Andreu Participant
Frankie Andreu Participant
Johan Bruyneel Participant
Daniel Coyle Participant
Michele Ferrari Participant
George Hincapie Participant
Phil Liggett Participant
Steve Madden Participant
Bill Strickland Participant
Jonathan Vaughters Participant
Emile Vrijman Participant
David Walsh Participant

Technical Credits
Alex Gibney Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Maryse Alberti Cinematographer
Jennie Amias Co-producer
Brett Banks Associate Producer
Andy Grieve Editor
Mark Higgins Co-producer
Beth Howard Co-producer
Lindy Jankura Editor
David Kahne Score Composer
Frank Marshall Producer
John McCullough Musical Direction/Supervision
Tim Squyres Editor
Matt Tolmach Producer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Armstrong Lie
1. Chapter 1 [5:38]
2. Chapter 2 [8:39]
3. Chapter 3 [6:39]
4. Chapter 4 [9:28]
5. Chapter 5 [11:42]
6. Chapter 6 [6:26]
7. Chapter 7 [5:44]
8. Chapter 8 [5:06]
9. Chapter 9 [7:31]
10. Chapter 10 [10:00]
11. Chapter 11 [12:43]
12. Chapter 12 [5:20]
13. Chapter 13 [8:18]
14. Chapter 14 [3:49]
15. Chapter 15 [3:02]
16. Chapter 16 [6:17]
17. Chapter 17 [7:04]

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The Armstrong Lie 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
JFK4TH More than 1 year ago
Excellent Documentary. If you like biking like I do it was nice to finally her most of the truth. I am still undecided if Lance doped in the 2009 Tour particularly in the final hill stage. Just a shame that a guy that seemed to have a pretty good life after miraculously defeating cancer would cheat with that gift of a second chance. I know that everybody doped in the Tour then (well at least all the "good: riders" but you just can't keep denying something when you are in that kind of a situation. Livestrong is still a wonderful thing but Lance has a lot of making up to do. I hope he does too