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Atomic Cafe
     

The Atomic Cafe

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The darkly comic documentary The Atomic Café comes to DVD with a standard full-frame transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1. The English soundtrack is rendered in Dolby Digital Stereo. There are neither subtitles nor closed captions on this release. Although there are no supplemental materials of any consequence, fans of this

Overview

The darkly comic documentary The Atomic Café comes to DVD with a standard full-frame transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1. The English soundtrack is rendered in Dolby Digital Stereo. There are neither subtitles nor closed captions on this release. Although there are no supplemental materials of any consequence, fans of this film's tongue-in-cheek look at the nuclear threat during the cold war will not be disappointed with the disc. Addition materials about the time would have improved this disc, but what is here is satisfactory.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Produced when the anti-nuclear movement was finding new strength in the United States, The Atomic Cafe is a disturbing and disquieting but frequently hilarious meditation on the early days of the atomic bomb. Produced with no voiceover narration, Cafe tells its tale through the editing of various clips from the 1940s and 1950s, along with some vintage nuclear-themed recordings of the era. Contemporary audiences will likely be mystified at the naïveté and ignorance exhibited by many of the ordinary citizens interviewed therein, and appalled at the lies of many of those in authority at the time. The blatant manipulation within much of the propaganda certainly produces laughs, but it also makes one ponder the gullibility of the American public, regardless of era. The many shots of atom and hydrogen bombs exploding also have a strange effect. While they are frequently frightening, the images themselves when taken objectively have a certain beauty. While the repetition of the film's basic message -- that America was (and continues to be) unwilling to face the unpleasant truth about its involvement with nuclear artillery and denied that truth in a variety of ways -- and its ironic tone both become wearing after a while. Nevertheless, the finale, in which a series of devastating explosions is intercut with people engaging in the futile "safety" tips given them by the government, is powerful and haunting.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/26/2002
UPC:
0767685949634
Original Release:
1982
Rating:
NR
Source:
New Video Group
Sound:
[Dolby Digital, stereo]
Time:
1:28:00
Sales rank:
5,333

Special Features

Interactive menus; Scene selection

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Side #1 --
0. Scene Selection
1. The Trinity Test [4:52]
2. Guilt Complex [5:28]
3. Bikini [6:22]
4. Year of Division [4:03]
5. WWIII? [6:15]
6. Communist Hunt [8:31]
7. H-Bomb [6:23]
8. Radiation Fallout [8:46]
9. Camp Desert Rock [10:38]
10. Duck and Cover [8:57]
11. Atomic Love [8:47]
12. Cold War [6:18]

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Customer Reviews

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The Atomic Cafe 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
JohnQ More than 1 year ago
The creators of this film firmly believe the adage that; it is better to laugh than to cry. They do a great job of collecting the most important pieces of historical footage of Atomic Bomb detonations and presents it with a an eye on revealing how ridiculous the government's advice was for it's own people and how ridiculous the public response was because of it. It is a thoroughly entertaining film but hard to classify. I have very mixed feelings when watching the film because my own father was on one of the ships that were sent by the Navy to assist in atomic bomb tests in the 1950's. The radiation he received eventually caused his death several decades later. So I don't take this subject matter lightly, but I believe the handling of it in this film is absolutely ingenious.
AB9BD More than 1 year ago
Atomic Cafe is a collection of documentary type footage, taken from the 1940s to the 1960s. I say Documentary type footage because the material included in these films is not exactly informing people of how they could reasonably expect to survive a nuclear war, as the films purport to do. There are some interesting things to take notice of, for instance the view that a heavy shelling of a region is used to soften up a target before the infantry moved in to secure it. This is the reason the military, shortsightedly at the very least, negligently at most, sent young men who had parents and Congressmen into a region which would almost certainly lead to a painful death from illness related to radiation. The radiation sickness might be avoided in the early stages after a blast, but the medical tracking on cancer caused by radiation was not yet as advanced as it is today. The majority of deaths from the bombs in Japan had been from heat and blast, and other injuries due to radiation sickness and injury. It would be some 20 years before medical science would begin connecting radiation to cancer. By August 9, 1965, atmospheric testing of nuclear bombs had been banned by the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago