Call of Cthulhu

Call of Cthulhu

4.5 4
Director: Andrew H. Leman

Cast: Andrew H. Leman, Matt Foyer, David Mersault, Noah Wagner

     
 

The Microcinema DVD of this modern silent horror effort comes filled with extras, though the 47 minute film itself is mightily impressive in its own right, as presented here. The makers have treated the film to an excellent full-screen (1.33-to-1)transfer, and one marvels at the realistic presence of vertical scratches (in high-resolution), to create the… See more details below

Overview

The Microcinema DVD of this modern silent horror effort comes filled with extras, though the 47 minute film itself is mightily impressive in its own right, as presented here. The makers have treated the film to an excellent full-screen (1.33-to-1)transfer, and one marvels at the realistic presence of vertical scratches (in high-resolution), to create the verisimilitude of watching an early twentieth century silent horror classic. Care has been taken so that the movie never looks so crisp or fresh so as to destroy the "period" illusion created by the theatrical original -- and the makers' use of odd angles and shadows work well on the small-screen. The audio is, of course, no problem at all, a modern digital recording of a contemporary score that it as timeless as most of the images presented. The disc opens to a multi-layered menu that is easy to maneuver around and offers simple access to the extras -- the highlights of the bonus material include a short film explaining the history of the production and the makers' approach to it, and various outtakes, of which the highlights are the stop-motion animation sequences.H.P. Lovecraft fans rejoice, because the story that spawned an entire mythology finally comes to the silver screen in this visionary feature that would strike terror into the hearts of even the Great Old Ones. A silent film shot in the expressionistic style of F.W. Murnau and Carl Theodore Dryer, director Andrew H. Leman's take on the Cthulu mythos follows the nephew of a renowned professor as he procures documents concerning a mysterious cult. The followers of an ancient deity who lies under the ocean waters awaiting the day that he will return to rule over the Earth, the Cthulu cult are convinced that the day of reckoning is at hand. According to his grandfather's notes, any mortal who hears the mighty Cthulu's call will be driven beyond madness. As the horrifying reality of this cosmic terror begins to take form, the frightened man passes the torch to his psychiatrist, who personally sets out to investigate the dark legend.

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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Bruce Eder
Andrew H. Leman's The Call of Cthulu, made in 2005, was deliberately designed to resemble -- in style, look, and approach -- a release of 80 years earlier vintage. A modern silent movie, it revels in visual styles and acting of a type that most audiences gave up for dead with the coming of sound at the end of the 1920s. And what makes this occult horror film such a marvel is that it succeeds precisely in revitalizing both those archaic styles and the emotional resonances that they carried, in modern terms. This is the kind of production that the late writer-director-producer Michael Powell would have adored -- Powell, who entered the movie business during the silent era but never directed a silent movie, used to describe the silents, when seen and shown properly, as existing in a continuum and reality that was all their own, akin to the total-immersion experience of opera (and the nearest that he got to making a silent was his adaptation of the opera The Tales of Hoffmann). Cthulu director Andre H. Leman and writer/producer Sean Branney have successfully created a modern-day entre into that other-worldly experience. Much of the movie owes a lot to German expressionism, as one would expect, and such touchstones of the horror/fantasy genre as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and Metropolis -- they haven't pushed the envelope too far in terms of anything new, just followed all of the rules to the letter and told an eerie and ominous story about madness and horror in the process. Watching the movie, one may forget, at times, that it is a twenty-first century creation -- David Robertson's cinematography has a way of making even the most innocuous-looking building fronts look threatening and somehow off-balance and eerie. The performances take an approach that hasn't been seen too often in movies since the days of John Gilbert, but within that context, it is all effective, and some of the performers, in their nuances and makeup, recall specific actors of the silent era such as Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. and Louis Wolheim.

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Product Details

Release Date:
05/29/2007
UPC:
0837101095662
Original Release:
2005
Source:
Microcinema
Region Code:
0
Presentation:
[B&W]
Sound:
[stereo, silent]
Time:
0:47:00

Cast & Crew

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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Call of Cthulhu
   Play Movie
   Chapters
   Languages
      Català - Catalan
      Hrvatski - Croatian
      Cestiny - Czech
      Danks - Danish
      Nederlands - Dutch
      English (Default)
      Euskera - Basque
      Suomeksi - Finnish
      Française - French
      Deutsche - German
      Galega - Galician
      Magyarra - Hungarian
      Gaeilge - Irish
      Italiano - Italian
      Lietuviy - Lithuanian
      Letzebeurgescht - Luxembourgish
      Norsk - Norwegian
      Polski - Polish
      Português - Portuguese
      Romaneste - Romanian
      Castellano - Spanish
      Svenska - Swedish
      Turkeli - Turkish
      Gymraeg - Welch
      Audio Options
         Hi-Fidelity Version
         Mythophonic Version
   Music
      Hi-Fidelity Version
      Mythophonic Version
   Extras
      The Trailer With Mythophonic Sound!
      Hearing "The Call," an Entertaining Short Subject
      Photographs From the Set in Vibrant Natural Color
      Production Stills to Recall Your Favorite Scenes
      Deleted Footage Including More Cthulhu Stop-Motion!

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