City of Lost Souls

City of Lost Souls

Director: Takashi Miike

Cast: Takashi Miike, Teah, Michelle Reis, Mitsuhiro Oikawa

     
 

Miike Takashi's offbeat crime drama has been given a respectful presentation for this DVD edition. The City Of Lost Souls has been given a pan-and-scan transfer at the full-frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1, and viewers have a choice of two Dolby Digital Stereo audio tracks -- one in Mandarin, and one in Cantonese. The disc also includes optional English subtitles.See more details below

Overview

Miike Takashi's offbeat crime drama has been given a respectful presentation for this DVD edition. The City Of Lost Souls has been given a pan-and-scan transfer at the full-frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1, and viewers have a choice of two Dolby Digital Stereo audio tracks -- one in Mandarin, and one in Cantonese. The disc also includes optional English subtitles. In addition, this DVD also includes the original theatrical trailer, an optional commentary track from director Takashi, a short documentary on the production of the film, and a trivia quiz.The fantastically prolific Takashi Miike directs this dizzyingly stylish thriller -- one of four in the year 2000 alone -- about love, cocaine, and exile. In the film's near-wordless opening, half-Japanese Brazil Mario (Teah) wipes out a room full of his fellow criminals in a bar in Sao Paolo and then strips naked in the dust storm outside. Mario is next seen one year later rescuing his Chinese girlfriend, Kei (Michelle Reis), from being deported. The event, which involved the hijacking of a helicopter, a gun fight amid the Joshua trees of the vast Japanese desert (!), and a harrowing 80-foot leap into Tokyo's Shinjuku district, instantly becomes the stuff of legend among Japan's large and beleaguered foreign population. Desperately wanting to get out of the country, Mario and Kei get entangled with a coke deal that goes sour between Mr. Ko (Mitsuhiro Oikawa), an effete though deadly Chinese mobster with unwholesome designs on Kei, and Fushimi (Koji Kikkawa), a psychotic yakuza who brutally kidnaps a blind orphan for his own terrible ends. Kung-fu cockfights, murderous Ping-Pong matches, and religious miracles ensue.

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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jonathan Crow
In The City of Lost Souls, as in his myriad of other works -- particularly his masterful Dead or Alive -- Miike populates his film with the sort of two-fisted stylistics that made him popular and that often draw comparisons to the great 1960s maverick Seijun Suzuki: Mario's rescue of Kei obviously takes place in the barren plains of the Mojave desert even though it is labelled "Saitama Prefecture"; a jaw-dropping CG cockfight that lampoons The Matrix; a dwarf who brushes his teeth with a bag full of prize Chinese cocaine; and a Brazilian drug lord whose murder is shot from point of view of the toilet -- complete with a pair of turds floating at the surface. While the film's stylistic bravura might not quite reach the utterly unhinged heights of Dead or Alive, Miike's underlying message is if anything more pointed and direct. While both films deal with the marginalized state of foreigners in Japan's traditional insular society, Lost Souls almost completely focuses on them. Set amid largely garishly lit salsa clubs, cockfighting rings, and smoky whorehouses, one begins to wonder if this is really Tokyo. Japan is portrayed simply as a place with money, limited opportunity, and a multi-ethnic population -- a far cry from the homogenous economic monolith that the government and Japan's right wing tries to project.

Product Details

Release Date:
12/17/2002
UPC:
0634991131629
Original Release:
2000
Rating:
R
Source:
CHIMERA

Cast & Crew

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Scene Index

Behind-the-scenes featurette; Director's commentary; Trivia game; Trailer

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