The Clock

Overview

The Clock was designed by MGM as a "small" picture--though characteristically, it was a bigger production than most "A" efforts from any other studio. Paul Gallico's simple story involves a girl Judy Garland and a GI Robert Walker, who meet under the huge clock at New York's Pennsylvania Station. Over the next 48 hours, the girl and the soldier fall in love, make the acquaintance of such lovable gotham types as cabbie James Gleason and inebriate Keenan Wynn, and decide to get married before the GI is shipped out ...
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Overview

The Clock was designed by MGM as a "small" picture--though characteristically, it was a bigger production than most "A" efforts from any other studio. Paul Gallico's simple story involves a girl Judy Garland and a GI Robert Walker, who meet under the huge clock at New York's Pennsylvania Station. Over the next 48 hours, the girl and the soldier fall in love, make the acquaintance of such lovable gotham types as cabbie James Gleason and inebriate Keenan Wynn, and decide to get married before the GI is shipped out again. The enormous Pennsylvania Station set, combined with some unusually convincing back projection MGM was hitherto notorious for the worst back projection in the business has convinced even lifelong New Yorkers that The Clock was actually lensed in Manhattan rather than Hollywood. Director Vincente Minnelli injected further visual dynamism in The Clock by seldom repeating the same camera angle twice.
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
The Clock was the first chance that either Judy Garland or Vincente Minnelli were given to show what they could do in a non-musical film, and they come through beautifully. A sweet (but not saccharine), gentle and perceptive film, it's small in scope but made with loving care and an attentive eye for detail. Minnelli succeeds in his stated ambition of making the City itself a third character - and it's a complex character that can both amuse and threaten, can entrance and then turn and break the heart. Using a seemingly endless array of camera angles, Minnelli captures the vastness of the City, as well as the loneliness of its inhabitants. Garland gives a wonderful, carefully calibrated performance. Her vulnerability, always inadequately masked, plays a consistent but losing battle with a tougher fa├žade. And as always, Garland uses her eyes -- those eyes that the camera loves -- to convey a panoply of complicated emotional responses. (Significantly, Robert Walker saves himself from a difficult moment with her when he notices that her eyes are brown.) Walker is also very good, quite believable as a bumbling, good-natured not-quite-hayseed. There's an unusual chemistry between the two, a chemistry that isn't always sure of itself, which matches the insecurity of their characters' relationship. A small gem, The Clock helped prepare Garland for the dramatic challenges of A Star is Born almost a decade later.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/6/2012
  • UPC: 883316676806
  • Original Release: 1945
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Archives
  • Region Code: 0
  • Presentation: Pan & Scan
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:30:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 16,152

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Judy Garland Alice Mayberry
Robert Walker Cpl. Joe Allen
James Gleason Al Henry
Keenan Wynn The Drunk
Marshall Thompson Bill
Lucille Gleason Mrs. Al Henry
Ruth Brady Helen
Paul E. Burns Bartender
Wheaton Chambers
Chester Clute Michael Henry
Dick Elliott Friendly Man
Moyna MacGill Luncheonette Lady
Arthur Space Blood Tester
Ray Teal Cop
Robert E. Homans Official
Technical Credits
Vincente Minnelli Director
Mac Alper Set Decoration/Design
George Bassman Score Composer
William Ferrari Art Director
George Folsey Cinematographer
Arthur Freed Producer
Cedric Gibbons Art Director
Arnold A. Gillespie Special Effects
Irene Costumes/Costume Designer
Robert Nathan Screenwriter
Warren Newcombe Special Effects
Joseph Schrank Screenwriter
George White Editor
Edwin B. Willis Set Decoration/Design
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2001

    You can't beat this 'CLOCK'!

    What can you say about a movie the stars Judy Garland and Robert Walker at their youthful peak? ''The Clock'' begins with a chance meeting between strangers during World War 2;Alice,a kind secretary and Joe, a young army officer on furlough in New York. As the couple draw closer together, a series of unexpected roadblocks threaten to pull them apart with all the action centering around 'the clock' at Grand Central Station. ''The Clock'' could be viewed as overly sentimental if measured by today's standards but that would negate it's powerful impact that withstands the test of time and provides Judy Garland with with her most luscious screen presence,bar none. The film was directed by Garland's then future husband Vincente Minelli, a master at painting a simple story with unique touches. It also offers a great balance to Robert Walker's memorable turn in ''Strangers on A Train'', the film he shot shortly before his untimely death. For all lovers of romance in it's purest form,''The Clock'' will surely tick for you. A classic.

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