The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover by Peter Greenaway |Peter Greenaway, Richard Bohringer, Michael Gambon, Helen Mirren | 13131139198 | DVD | Barnes & Noble
Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover

The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover

4.0 2
Director: Peter Greenaway

Cast: Peter Greenaway, Richard Bohringer, Michael Gambon, Helen Mirren

     
 
One of director Peter Greenaway's most well-known movies, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover has rarely appeared as such a fine work of art as it does on this DVD. Though the DVD isn't fitted with much supplemental material, the widescreen 2.35:1 presentation makes up for it by filling the screen with shockingly vibrant colors. Whether Greenaway and

Overview

One of director Peter Greenaway's most well-known movies, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover has rarely appeared as such a fine work of art as it does on this DVD. Though the DVD isn't fitted with much supplemental material, the widescreen 2.35:1 presentation makes up for it by filling the screen with shockingly vibrant colors. Whether Greenaway and director of photography Sacha Vierny bathe their frames in light or paint with dark red and green filters, the DVD keeps ample pace. The Dolby Digital 2.0 sound is a fine match to the bold imagery, supplying the wicked dialogue and composer Michael Nyman's baroque score with fierce power. Extras consist solely of a "Chapter Selections" menu and two theatrical trailers. The "Chapter Selections" menu gives instant access to the DVD's 30 chapters via chapter title
umber. The widescreen theatrical trailers, one at three-and-a-half minutes and one at one minute in length, are both quite interesting.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Tom Wiener
Filmmaker Peter Greenaway's most notorious film in a career marked by audacity, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover includes scenes of intense and shocking brutality and humiliation, fevered sexual encounters, and a final act of forced cannibalism. But what is most striking about the film is its visual style. Shot by the late, legendary Sacha Vierny in glorious widescreen compositions (this is a film that demands to be seen on video in a letterboxed edition), The Cook often unfolds like a medieval tapestry, as Vierny's camera tracks from one room of the restaurant, where most of the story takes place, to another. The characters are more types than flesh-and-blood people, as the title suggests. Michael Gambon gets to have the most fun out of his Thief, bellowing and flailing about. As in many other Greenaway films, the actors serve merely as game pieces to be moved about on a brilliantly designed board, but here, Greenaway offers a more linear story about the ways good people accommodate evil. If nothing else, The Cook is his most accessible film -- albeit for those with strong stomachs.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/13/2001
UPC:
0013131139198
Original Release:
1989
Rating:
R
Source:
Starz / Anchor Bay
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
2:04:00

Special Features

Widescreen presentation [2.35:1] enhanced for 16x9 TVs; Theatrical trailers

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Richard Bohringer Richard Borst, the Cook
Michael Gambon Albert Spica, the Thief
Helen Mirren Georgina Spica, the Wife
Alan Howard Michael, the Lover
Tim Roth Mitchel
Ciarán Hinds Cory
Liz Smith Grace
Gary Olsen Spangler
Ewan Stewart Harris
Roger Ashton-Griffiths Turpin
Ron Cook Mews
Hywel William Ellis Actor
Alex Fraser Actor
Patricia Walters Actor
Karrie Pagano Kitchen Staff
Elmer Gillespie Patricia
Janet Henfrey Alice
Arnie Breevelt Eden
Tony Alleff Troy
Paul Russell Pup
Alex Kingston Adele
Ian Sears Phillipe
Willie Ross Roy
Ian Dury Terry Fitch
Diane Langton May Fitch
Prudence Oliver Corelle Fitch
Roger Lloyd Pack Geoff
Bob Goody Starkie
Peter Rush Melter
Pauline Mayer Fish Girl
Ben Stoneham Meat Boy
Andy Wilson Diner
John Mullis Diner
Brenda Edwards Dancer
Sophie Goodchild Dancer
Michael Clark Waiter
Gary Logan Waiter
Tim Geary Waiter
Saffron Rainey Waiter
Michael Maguire Waiter
Sue Maund Kitchen Staff
Nick Brozovic Kitchen Staff

Technical Credits
Peter Greenaway Director,Screenwriter
CinemaScope Cinematographer
Pascale Dauman Producer
Constance de Vos Set Decoration/Design
Sjoerd Didden Makeup
Daniel Toscan du Plantier Producer
Jean-Paul Gaultier Costumes/Costume Designer
John Wilson Editor
Kees Kasander Producer
Sara Meerman Makeup
Michael Nyman Score Composer
Jan Roelfs Production Designer
Ben Van Os Production Designer
Sacha Vierny Cinematographer
Denis Wigman Producer

Scene Index

Chapter Selections
0. Chapter Selections
0. Menu Group #1 with 31 chapter(s) covering 02:04:04
1. Program Start/Main Titles [1:54]
2. A Good Dinner [3:20]
3. The Kitchen And The Cook [5:17]
4. Quality & Protection [2:57]
5. A True Gourmet [3:47]
6. The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, And Her Lover [5:14]
7. Restroom Rendezvous [6:36]
8. Friday Night Feast [3:10]
9. Passion in the Pantry [4:03]
10. Lewd & Crude [5:08]
11. Degradation [3:24]
12. Sensual Saturday [6:06]
13. Polite Conversation [5:09]
14. Marital Strife [1:30]
15. Sunday Special [4:54]
16. The Floor Show [5:19]
17. Prying Eyes [1:51]
18. Monday Madness [4:02]
19. Jealous Rampage [3:35]
20. Filth & Freedom [4:04]
21. Tuesday For Two [2:25]
22. Brutal Interrogation [4:46]
23. The Thief's Revenge [3:41]
24. Farewell, Lover [4:39]
25. At Each Other's Throats [2:09]
26. Georgina's Confession [3:31]
27. What The Cook Saw [9:15]
28. Friday's Private Function [2:51]
29. A Meal From Hell [6:03]
30. End Credits [3:06]

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The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Scenes were deleted from the R version as compared to the unrated versioin.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Peter Greenaway's, The Cook, the Theif, His Wife and Her Lover, has been long been one of my favorite movies. It is richy, simultaneously grotesque and beautiful. I'll leave the descriptions off his visual artistry to other reviewers. What I've only just figured out, two decades since it's release, is that this movie is an ingenious revision of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus. Greenaway has simplifies W.S.'s complicated list of players, combine a few, and explored alternative motives. With a mastery that parallel's Shakespeare's of words, he delivers a visual feast that leaves me salivating for more, though my own intellect tells me I ought to be repulsed and nauseated. Like Titus, honorably serving up bloody victories to his emperor and Rome, the cook provides endlessly tortured cuisines to his restarant's new owner, the Thief. The thief, by comparison to W.S.'s Saturnine expresses no graciousness, to say the least. THe more painstaking and beautiful the offering, the more distain is hashed out to the cook. Enter the Wife, who could be interpreted as the alter ego of Tamora, the goth queen in Titus, more victim in Greenaway's script than in Shakespeare's play. Perhaps she is a compilation of Titus's raped and mutilated daughter and the queen, who, though evil, begins her role as captive prisoner and mortified mother(her oldest son sacrificed by Titus in the first act). The mutilation of the angelic kitchen boy in Greenaway's movie satisfies the requirement of absolute indecency inflicted on the innocent in order to throw the plot into it's headlong tallspin toward disaster. The comparisons are endless. If you love Shakespeare and haven't yet seen this movie, it's definately worth a seat at the table!