Dark Side of the Heart

The Dark Side of the Heart

Director: Eliseo Subiela

Cast: Darío Grandinetti, Sandra Ballesteros, Nacha Guevara

     
 

This pilot film for a TV series titled Hancock was initially telecast as The Dark Side of Innocence. The Hancocks are a tightly-knit, prosperous California family. Mom and Pop Hancock (John Anderson and Kim Hunter) oversee a thriving lumber business--when they're not refereeing the travails of their five children. The pilot episode concentrates on the…  See more details below

Overview

This pilot film for a TV series titled Hancock was initially telecast as The Dark Side of Innocence. The Hancocks are a tightly-knit, prosperous California family. Mom and Pop Hancock (John Anderson and Kim Hunter) oversee a thriving lumber business--when they're not refereeing the travails of their five children. The pilot episode concentrates on the oldest daughter (Joanna Pettet), who has decided she's sick of being a society matron and has returned to the Hancock manse with her own kids in tow. The remaining Hancock kids all have problems of their own, especially embittered divorcee Anne Archer. The Hancocks didn't fly as a series, which means that some of the crises presented in the pilot are never resolved.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Richie Unterberger
This whimsical Eliseo Subiela film has the unusual and ambitious qualities one would expect from the director of the excellent Man Facing Southeast. Yet at the same time, there's a coldness to the characters, and a slight silliness to the scenarios, that make it a disappointment -- especially coming from the director of Man Facing Southeast, a film that struck an admirable balance between the real and the surreal. The way protagonist Darío Grandinetti disposes (almost literally) of his lovers is too cruel to evoke more than queasy laughter, although the intention seems to be at least somewhat comic; his romantic quest for lovers who can literally fly too absurd to be laudable or even engaging; and his self-absorption so off-putting that it's not at all mitigated by his devotion to poetry. His running buddies in art and love are no more admirable in their shameless pursuit of sex and kicks, which seems more hedonistic than subversive. That's not to say that there aren't some good ideas at work, even if they're a little on the forced and fanciful side, such as his ongoing encounters with Death (whose repeated admonitions for Grandinetti to find a job in advertising are about as close as the film comes to trenchant seriocomedy). And there's a truly scarifying scene in which a Nina Hagen-like singer screeches some almighty bleak rock & roll to passersby. Not even the prostitutes that Grandinetti connects with arouse too much of the viewers' sympathies or curiosities, and while the directorial blurs between harsh reality and dreamlike passages (including one in which a cow assumes the voice of the main character's mother) stoke the imagination, they don't resonate with our emotions.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/15/2003
UPC:
0736899080228
Original Release:
1992
Rating:
R
Source:
Cinemateca
Region Code:
1
Time:
2:07:00

Special Features

Fullscreen; Booklet; Chapter selection; English language subtitles

Cast & Crew

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Scene Index

Side #1 --
2. Opening Titles [3:54]
3. Cabaret Sefini [13:31]
4. Meeting With Death [9:51]
5. The Exhibition: Art in Freedom [5:14]
6. The Moustache and the Roller Coaster [6:28]
7. Back to Montevideo [8:04]
8. The Blind Girl [10:54]
9. Mother, Books and Death [8:48]
10. Ana by Daylight [14:31]
11. Crying One's Heart Out [10:22]
12. Give Her What She Wants [11:15]
13. Love Poems [9:23]
14. The One Who Flies [6:52]
15. Final Credits [7:01]

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