The Double Headed Eagle: Hitler's Rise to Power 1918-1933

( 1 )

Overview

The Double Headed Eagle: Hitler's Rise to Power 1918-1933 presents a unique and disturbing look at the rise of the Nazi party. The documentary, directed by Lutz Becker, attempts to remain as objective as possible, serving as a neutral observer of the years 1918 through 1933 in Germany. Via newsreel footage and clips of features from the era, the film offers a kaleidoscopic view of the many elements that fueled the rise of the Socialist Nationalist Party, including post-WWI poverty. Hitler occupies a central place...
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DVD (B&W / Colorized)
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Overview

The Double Headed Eagle: Hitler's Rise to Power 1918-1933 presents a unique and disturbing look at the rise of the Nazi party. The documentary, directed by Lutz Becker, attempts to remain as objective as possible, serving as a neutral observer of the years 1918 through 1933 in Germany. Via newsreel footage and clips of features from the era, the film offers a kaleidoscopic view of the many elements that fueled the rise of the Socialist Nationalist Party, including post-WWI poverty. Hitler occupies a central place in the documentary.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 7/18/2006
  • UPC: 738329046323
  • Original Release: 1973
  • Rating:

  • Source: Kino Video
  • Presentation: B&W / Colorized
  • Time: 1:26:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 90,968

Cast & Crew

Technical Credits
Lutz Becker Director
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Double Headed Eagle: Hitler's Rise to Power 1918-1933
1. Berlin Sports Palace [8:06]
2. Save the Fatherland [7:25]
3. German Day [7:08]
4. Bismarck Commemoration [2:31]
5. The 20's [6:43]
6. Rally in Nuremberg [6:41]
7. Morning in Berlin [8:25]
8. New Flags [9:36]
9. Economic Crisis [5:47]
10. Speech to the Unemployed [9:04]
11. Hitler Returns [8:37]
12. The Chancellor [5:58]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- The Double Headed Eagle: Hitler's Rise to Power 1918-1933
   Play Film
   Chapters
   Photo Gallery
      Enter Gallery
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 8, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Gradual buildup of evil In this film, there is no narration. T

    Gradual buildup of evil

    In this film, there is no narration. The only sound comes from the footage itself, taken from both newsreels and German musicals. At first, it was hard to get used to, but once I replayed the film, I understood: no narration was needed; the film spoke for itself. Beginning with the triumphant Nazis, speaking to a standing room only crowd, it then jumps back to the end of World War I, with scenes of the German homefront and the extreme poverty that existed. The German identity was all the people had to cling to. And then you begin to see some soon-to-be familiar faces: a young Hitler wearing a light-colored trenchcoat (startling to anybody familiar with the common footage showing him in dark suits and uniforms), Goebbels getting out of a car, etc. All gradual, and threaded through the film. Membership in the party begins with just a handful -- scenes of two large truckfulls of Nazis descending on a group of at first bewildered rural townspeople, then boat rides through holiday camps to lure vacationers, then trainfulls of young Nazi supporters coming to increasingly larger rallies as the membership grows. And juxtaposed against this are scenes of the '20s: visiting celebrities like Buster Keaton and Josephine Baker, Baker appearing with her manager, riding in a luxury car with her maid standing nearby holding her dog, leading into a scene of a Berlin nightclub where she performs a decidedly PG-rated version of her famous "banana dance". A musical clip of an ordinary working girl's morning -- complete with a grim-faced landlady in Victorian dress bringing her breakfast of coffee(?) and sausage that she takes to work with her. In the later part of the decade, the beginnings of unrest; by 1928-9, there are street fights battled by policemen wearing the pointed helmets of decades earlier (I only thought World War I generals had those). The beginning of the depression -- a clip from the German version of "The Blue Angel" features Dietrich singing the song we know as "Falling in Love Again" and another from a German answer to a Busby Berkley film interwoven with street demonstrations by Communists, the head of one household literally shoving a would-be evictor out of his family's apartment, people signing up for the dole. And now, the Nazis have their own newspapers. More unrest...the Nazis grow in numbers, Hitler becomes Chancellor...


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