The End of Poverty?

Overview

The aphorism "The poor are always with us" dates back to the New Testament, but while the phrase is still sadly apt in the 21st century, few seem to be able to explain why poverty is so widespread. Activist filmmaker Philippe Diaz examines the history and impact of economic inequality in the third world in the documentary The End of Poverty?, and makes the compelling argument that it's not an accident or simple bad luck that has created a growing underclass around the world. Diaz traces the growth of global ...
See more details below
Blu-ray (Wide Screen / Stereo)
$24.16
BN.com price
(Save 19%)$29.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Blu-ray)
  • All (4) from $18.61   
  • New (4) from $18.61   

Overview

The aphorism "The poor are always with us" dates back to the New Testament, but while the phrase is still sadly apt in the 21st century, few seem to be able to explain why poverty is so widespread. Activist filmmaker Philippe Diaz examines the history and impact of economic inequality in the third world in the documentary The End of Poverty?, and makes the compelling argument that it's not an accident or simple bad luck that has created a growing underclass around the world. Diaz traces the growth of global poverty back to colonization in the 15th century, and features interviews with a number of economists, sociologists, and historians who explain how poverty is the clear consequence of free-market economic policies that allow powerful nations to exploit poorer countries for their assets and keep money in the hands of the wealthy rather than distributing it more equitably to the people who have helped them gain their fortunes. Diaz also explores how wealthy nations especially the United States seize a disproportionate share of the world's natural resources, and how this imbalance is having a dire impact on the environment as well as the economy. The End of Poverty? was an official selection at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival.
Read More Show Less

Special Features

"Speaking Freely Vol. 1: John Perkins" - best-selling author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man speaks candidly about international finance and the crippling debt wealthy countries impose on the poor - Blu-Ray exclusive!; "Changes in Venezula" - a look at Hugo Chavez's reforms and the impact on Venezuela's poor - Blu-Ray exclusive!; 10 steps to end global poverty - Blu-Rau exclusive!; Theatrical trailer; Extended interviews w/ experts including- John Perkin: How Economic Hit Men Work, Heather Remoff: Colonialism and Monoculture in Africa, Joshua Farley: How Land Tax in Brazil would break up Latifundia, Mason Gaffney: How U.S. companies gain control of land overseas, HWO Okoth-Ogendo: On private property, Gitu wa Kahengeri: On the results of Indepence
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Writing a negative review of a documentary on world poverty is akin to booing Santa Claus at the Thanksgiving Day parade, but The End of Poverty? does not present many exemplary qualities for a stringent critic to applaud. In the end, the film is an informative experience, and people will definitely emerge from the theater a bit smarter than when they entered, which is more than can be said of the vast majority of cinematic fare these days. Director Philippe Diaz and the producers have assembled a sporadically compelling PBS-style history of poverty which clarifies a great deal about how the gap between the haves and the have-nots has become so appallingly wide. Experts such as Nobel Prize winners Amartya Sen and Joseph Stiglitz, economic "hitman" John Perkins, and political science guru Chalmers Johnson provide prescient information revealing how the three C's of global oppression colonialism, capitalism, Christianity have enacted and supported economic patterns which absolutely ensure that former colonies will remain the equivalent of indentured servants to their former occupiers. Unfortunately, almost none of these great minds are asked to expound on how these afflicted nations might possibly escape from these entrenched patterns in the future. The information is almost entirely historical, and it is piled on in such quantity that even the most altruistic viewer is left with a grim cynicism that poverty is the result of an impaired economic system which will remain impervious to individual attempts at counteraction. By the time an expert named Clifford Cobb, who happens to be the film's executive producer, finally gets around to briefly outlining a plan for trying to rectify more than 500 years' worth of brutal economic subjugation, the seed has been drowned by a deluge of history and statistics. Also, while the filmmakers provide detailed coverage of several impoverished nations in South America and Africa, Asia is mysteriously absent from their analysis. In particular, it certainly would have been relevant to consider the complex and extraordinary case of South Korea, in order to examine how a war-torn third-world nation somehow transformed itself into a financially solvent world power in little more than 50 years. Despite these problems, the film deserves to be seen, and if every person in America paid to see The End of Poverty? rather than Saw VI, the world would benefit immeasurably.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/24/2011
  • UPC: 881394111127
  • Original Release: 2008
  • Source: Cinema Libre
  • Region Code: 0
  • Presentation: Wide Screen / Stereo
  • Sound: stereo
  • Language: English, Français, Español, Portugais
  • Time: 1:44:00
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Sales rank: 98,288

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Martin Sheen Voice Only
Amartya Sen Participant
Eduardo Yssa Participant
Nora Castañeda Participant
William Easterly Participant
Eric Toussaint Participant
Oscar Olivera Participant
Joseph Stiglitz Participant
Eric Mgendi Participant
Jerome Guillet Participant
Joshua Farley Participant
Nimrod Arackha Participant
Kipruto Arap Kirwa Participant
Joseph Ole Kishau Participant
John Perkins Participant
Chalmers Johnson Participant
Clifford Cobb Participant
Susan George Participant
Technical Credits
Philippe Diaz Director, Cinematographer, Screenwriter
Luci Alcantara Production Manager
Cristian Bettler Score Composer, Associate Producer
Chesa Boudin Production Manager
Patrick Bowsher Sound Mixer
Richard Castro Co-producer
Clifford Cobb Executive Producer
Tom Von Doom Editor
Jean Friedman-Rudovsky Production Manager
Tracey Morris Camera Operator
Carla Ortiz Associate Producer
Beth Portello Producer, Sound/Sound Designer
Max Soussan Score Composer
Matthew Stillman Co-producer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously