Eye

The Eye

4.3 3
Director: Oxide Pang Chun, Danny Pang

Cast: Lee Sin-Je, Lawrence Chou

     
 

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Sustaining a palpable sense of dread throughout while providing frequent effective shocks, the latest offering from the Pang brothers successfully balances the more horrific aspects of their supernatural tale with some thoughtful personal touches. Though horror fans will inevitably draw comparisons to such aesthetically similar efforts as The Sixth Sense and

Overview

Sustaining a palpable sense of dread throughout while providing frequent effective shocks, the latest offering from the Pang brothers successfully balances the more horrific aspects of their supernatural tale with some thoughtful personal touches. Though horror fans will inevitably draw comparisons to such aesthetically similar efforts as The Sixth Sense and The Ring, The Eye stands well enough on its own by offering a stylishly rendered tale of terror and well-drawn, sympathetic characters. As Mun (Angelica Lee) struggles to adjust to a new world of sight and Dr. Wah (Lawrence Chou) attempts to assist her in expanding her visual vocabulary, the audience truly feels how disorienting it might be to suddenly experience the world in an entirely new context. Add in the supernatural visions that she suffers upon regaining her sight and her struggles to maintain her sanity amidst increasingly disturbing encounters, and the viewer gradually grows to experience Mun's plight in a remarkably personalized way. Additionally, the subsequent effect that the death of a minor but pivotal character has on Mun provides a well-drawn transition in her understanding of how her gift may be used. Clearly attracted to Mun, the protective Dr. Wah's ethical dilemma in contrast to his older and more professional uncle renders his conflicted character equally three-dimensional. Though the characters and their plights are effectively portrayed, the fright factor is what ultimately drives this film, and the Pang brothers certainly deliver. As visual stylists, the duo is a formidable force that knows well how film a visually extravagant and horrifyingly grotesque scare. The assured cinematography and striking imagery frequently succeed in creating beautiful depictions of often disturbing events. Perfectly complementing their visual craftsmanship, their equally adept editing skills set the stage for some of the most memorably jarring set pieces in recent horror history. As usual with many successful Asian films of late, The Eye was quickly optioned for an American remake. Jason Buchanan

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jason Buchanan
Sustaining a palpable sense of dread throughout while providing frequent effective shocks, the latest offering from the Pang brothers successfully balances the more horrific aspects of their supernatural tale with some thoughtful personal touches. Though horror fans will inevitably draw comparisons to such aesthetically similar efforts as The Sixth Sense and The Ring, The Eye stands well enough on its own by offering a stylishly rendered tale of terror and well-drawn, sympathetic characters. As Mun (Angelica Lee) struggles to adjust to a new world of sight and Dr. Wah (Lawrence Chou) attempts to assist her in expanding her visual vocabulary, the audience truly feels how disorienting it might be to suddenly experience the world in an entirely new context. Add in the supernatural visions that she suffers upon regaining her sight and her struggles to maintain her sanity amidst increasingly disturbing encounters, and the viewer gradually grows to experience Mun's plight in a remarkably personalized way. Additionally, the subsequent effect that the death of a minor but pivotal character has on Mun provides a well-drawn transition in her understanding of how her gift may be used. Clearly attracted to Mun, the protective Dr. Wah's ethical dilemma in contrast to his older and more professional uncle renders his conflicted character equally three-dimensional. Though the characters and their plights are effectively portrayed, the fright factor is what ultimately drives this film, and the Pang brothers certainly deliver. As visual stylists, the duo is a formidable force that knows well how film a visually extravagant and horrifyingly grotesque scare. The assured cinematography and striking imagery frequently succeed in creating beautiful depictions of often disturbing events. Perfectly complementing their visual craftsmanship, their equally adept editing skills set the stage for some of the most memorably jarring set pieces in recent horror history. As usual with many successful Asian films of late, The Eye was quickly optioned for an American remake.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/21/2003
UPC:
0660200309022
Original Release:
2002
Rating:
R
Source:
Palm Pictures / Umvd
Region Code:
1
Time:
1:38:00

Special Features

16x9 widescreen; 5.1 Surround Sound; Making of video; Theatrical trailer; Tv spot; Previews; Weblinks; And More

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Lee Sin-Je Mun
Lawrence Chou Dr. Wah
Chutcha Rujinanon Ling
Candy Lo Yee
Pierre Png Dr. Eak
Ko Yin Ping Mun's Grandmother
Edmund Chen Dr. Lo
Yut Lai So Yingying
Wilson Yip Taoist
Benjamin Yuen Mr. Ching

Technical Credits
Oxide Pang Chun Director,Editor,Screenwriter
Danny Pang Director,Editor,Screenwriter
Peter Ho-Sun Chan Producer
Lawrence Cheng Producer
Cub Chin Asst. Director
Allan Fung Executive Producer
Jojo Hui Associate Producer,Screenwriter
Jittima Kongsri Costumes/Costume Designer
Ornage Music Score Composer
Decha Seemanta Cinematographer
Simon So Art Director
Kritapas Suttinet Art Director
Eric Tsang Executive Producer
Stephanie Wong Costumes/Costume Designer
Daniel Yun Executive Producer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Eye
1. Fresh Eyes [4:16]
2. Meeting Ying Ying [3:32]
3. Blurred Vision [6:25]
4. Hospital Hallway [3:59]
5. A Vision on the Highway [:45]
6. Dr. Lo [3:47]
7. A Missing Report Card [4:47]
8. A Foreign Place [5:38]
9. Calligraphy Lesson [2:40]
10. The Noodle Shop [4:07]
11. Can You Help? [3:26]
12. The Elevator [4:34]
13. A Boy's Trauma [1:08]
14. Helping Mun [6:07]
15. Ying Ying's Visit [4:49]
16. The Wrong Picture [3:23]
17. To Thailand [5:32]
18. Ling's Story [3:46]
19. A Night in Ling's Room [3:14]
20. Forgiveness [4:58]
21. Beauty [1:55]
22. Warning [4:50]
23. Disaster [4:26]
24. End Credits [2:07]

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The Eye 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Angelica Lee is GREAT in this film about a blind woman who receievs a cornea transplant and gets an extra "gift" along with restored vision: The ability to see ghosts. The Pang Brothers have an incredible flare for colours and scene composition. If you enjoy watching well directed film, you'll love this. I found myself cheering for the main character the whole way through. Give this film a look!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Eye is exactly what I love about Asian Horrors/Suspense movies. Rather than being all about blood and guts all over throughout the movie which most movies are, this movie digs into your nerves with a story of a blind woman wanting to see the world of its beauty (and okay, some not so beautiful things). As it continues, you're so wrapped up into what will happen you can say goodbye to our horror/suspense films
Anonymous More than 1 year ago