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Filth and the Fury
     

The Filth and the Fury

5.0 3
Director: Julien Temple

Cast: John (Johnny Rotten) Lydon, Sid Vicious, Paul Cook

 
Punk rock's most notorious outlaws arrive in dangerous digital form in this insightful and feature-intensive release from New Line Home Entertainment. This comprehensive documentary of the Sex Pistols' brief but legendary career is presented here in 1.85:1 widescreen (enhanced for 16 x 9 TVs) and accompanied by a closed-captioned English Dolby Digital soundtrack that

Overview

Punk rock's most notorious outlaws arrive in dangerous digital form in this insightful and feature-intensive release from New Line Home Entertainment. This comprehensive documentary of the Sex Pistols' brief but legendary career is presented here in 1.85:1 widescreen (enhanced for 16 x 9 TVs) and accompanied by a closed-captioned English Dolby Digital soundtrack that will bring viewers back to the early days when punk was unpredictable and exciting. Subtitles are available in English only. Extensive extra features offered on this disc include: feature-length commentary from director Julien Temple, the original documentary "Un-Defining Punk: An In-Depth Examination of the Punk Rock Movement," an original theatrical trailer, and DVD-ROM links to the original theatrical website.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Gregory Baird
The legendary British punk band the Sex Pistols objected to director Temple's mock documentary, The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle, in which Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McClaren touted the band as his own media creation. So Temple revisited the band for The Filth and the Fury, inviting band members to set the record straight. Some footage from Swindle pops up again, juxtaposed with present-day interviews with surviving band members, including lead singer Johnny Rotten (a.k.a. John Lydon). The film also offers vintage footage of the Sex Pistols in concert, with glimpses of the outrageous behavior -- onstage and off -- that made them national pariahs in England during their two-year career. Whether the band's story is finally told right here is a point made moot by the intentionally jumbled editing. What The Filth and the Fury does achieve, though, is an effective depiction of the maelstrom of controversy, vilification, and violence that surrounded the band, as well as the heroin-driven downward spiral of notorious Pistols bass player, Sid Vicious. The result is an engaging, ultimately enigmatic portrait of these seminal punk icons.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/10/2000
UPC:
0794043508622
Original Release:
2000
Rating:
R
Source:
New Line Home Video
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital, stereo]
Time:
1:43:00

Special Features

Widescreen version of the film; Feature-length commentary by director Julien Temple; Original documentary: "Undefining Punk: An In-depth Examination of the Punk Movement"; Original theatrical trailer; DVD-ROM links to original theatrical website

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Side #1 --
0. Scene Selections
1. The Crowd of England [5:14]
2. Before [4:18]
3. Fashion [4:00]
4. Coming Together [3:24]
5. Sculpting [3:27]
6. Performing [6:46]
7. Anti-Star [6:15]
8. Sid/An Ugly Band [3:43]
9. Infamous Language [7:28]
10. The Punk Rock Threat [4:18]
11. Sid Joins the Band [4:43]
12. A New Contract [3:06]
13. God Save the Queen [9:48]
14. Nancy/Postcard Punks [5:03]
15. The Spots [2:09]
16. Huddersfield [4:23]
17. America [3:15]
18. The Last Show [5:57]
19. No Future [8:52]
20. End Credits [7:20]

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The Filth and the Fury 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was an Awesome film, I couldn't stop watching it. I remember the whole start up to the Punk rock era and the Sex Pistols nailed it,they were pure attitude and never held back any view point they had. This movie really shows how REAL the pistols were.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Sex Pistols were the best band ever and not only because of their music because they did things that no other band has ever done these guys were considered dangerous in the very fabric of public and shure yeah the Beatles were but the Beatles had no reason to the Sex Pistols did. The Sex Pistols were mean they messed with the british monarchy with one song, they were banned from playing live across the country, they defied all authority they were the most dangerous, anti-establishment band of all history they were actually even supposed to be hung at London's Traitors' Gates but they didn't they are awesome Sex Pistols.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Outstandingly frank look back, through recent interviews and vintage films of the band's 70s hey day. From Johnny Rotton's young nililihist sneer to his modern day incarnation, still glaringly hurt over the death of Sid. I doubt Mr. Rotton feels happy at the way Sid s pathetic death has been glorified by the public. His angry taunts of Sid being a stupid c**t are followed by a poorly stifled sob at his friend s memory. For a brief moment, the sneering Johnny Rotton wears his heart on his sleeve. (The manner of the modern day interviews, with the surviving members of the band showing only a dark profile, as if in the Witness Protection Program only makes it more stunning) He misses Sid desparately, they were reputedly as close as brothers. Once Sid, at John's insistance, joins the band, it all goes quickly downhill for the newest band member. A handsome young man, barely out of his teens, slowly shreds himself right in front of the camera. Pathetic end to a sad life, fame or no. Every legendary Pistols act is charted and captured on the tapes. It s a fascinating look back, to see them as they actually were doing what they actually did. The archival footage shows that someone in that anarchistic carnival had the foresite to think past tomorrow. In the end, that's more what broke up the band than Sid's drug habit. Sid and Johnny wanted to play down with the whole system, and acted the part. Glen and Paul, the other two members, saw a chance to get out of the London slums, and wanted to act more acceptably so the band s shows would stop being cancelled. Johnny sneered at the thought and Sid was too far gone to think much at all. 26 months after they started, the Pistols stopped. Sid was dead soon after, and thirty years on the remaining members of the band are now middle aged and mellowed. (They even went on a re-union tour, which a much older, pouchy Mr. Rotton led off with a , Hey, we're fat, we re forty, and we re back! High comedy. He now lives in a very nice beach front house in California. In the end, Johnny made like the character Alex of A Clockwork Orange - he just grew up, despite himself. Sid, who personified everything the young Pistols stood for, never gave himself the chance to, he provides the film s most harrowing, sad moments. Great music, surprising well produced, well worth the money.