The Godfather Part III

( 15 )

Overview

After a break of more than 15 years, director Francis Ford Coppola and writer Mario Puzo returned to the well for this third and final story of the fictional Corleone crime family. Two decades have passed, and crime kingpin Michael Corleone Al Pacino, now divorced from his wife Kay Diane Keaton, has nearly succeeded in keeping his promise that his family would one day be "completely legitimate." A philanthropist devoted to public service, Michael is in the news as the recipient of a special award from the Pope ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (9) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $10.86   
  • Used (7) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$10.86
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(709)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New item! Ships from California. Tracking will be provided for every domestic order within the USA.

Ships from: Irvine, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$26.39
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(2302)

Condition: New
097363231844 This item is brand new. Please allow 4 - 14 business days for Standard shipping, within the US. Thank you for supporting our small, family-owned business!

Ships from: ACWORTH, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

After a break of more than 15 years, director Francis Ford Coppola and writer Mario Puzo returned to the well for this third and final story of the fictional Corleone crime family. Two decades have passed, and crime kingpin Michael Corleone Al Pacino, now divorced from his wife Kay Diane Keaton, has nearly succeeded in keeping his promise that his family would one day be "completely legitimate." A philanthropist devoted to public service, Michael is in the news as the recipient of a special award from the Pope for his good works, a controversial move given his checkered past. Determined to buy redemption, Michael and his lawyer B.J. George Hamilton are working on a complicated but legal deal to bail the Vatican out of looming financial troubles that will ultimately reap billions and put Michael on the world stage as a major financial player. However, trouble looms in several forms: The press is hostile to his intentions. Michael is in failing health and suffers a mild diabetic stroke. Stylish mob underling Joey Zaza Joe Mantegna is muscling into the Corleone turf. "The Commission" of Mafia families, represented by patriarch Altobello Eli Wallach doesn't want to let their cash cow Corleone out of the Mafia, though he has made a generous financial offer in exchange for his release from la cosa nostra. And then there's Vincent Mancini Andy Garcia, the illegitimate and equally temperamental son of Michael's long-dead brother Sonny. Vincent desperately wants in to the family both literally and figuratively, and at the urging of his sister Connie Talia Shire, Michael welcomes the young man and allows him to adopt the Corleone name. However, a flirtatious attraction between Vincent and his cousin, Michael's naïve daughter Mary Sofia Coppola develops, and threatens to develop into a full-fledged romance and undo the godfather's future plans.
Read More Show Less

Special Features

Closed Caption; Commentary by director Francis Ford Coppola; Widescreen version enhanced for 16:9 TV's; Theatrical trailer; Dolby Digital- English 5.1 surround/French 2.0; English subtitles
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
Derided by some as upon its theatrical release in 1990, the second Godfather sequel has weathered the intervening years quite gracefully, and it no longer seems as contrived or overwrought as its detractors maintained. The story begins in 1979, as Michael Corleone Al Pacino again, having divested himself of his illegal operations, finds himself being honored by the Catholic Church for his various charitable contributions. Michael hopes to repair his fractured relationships with ex-wife Kay Diane Keaton and daughter Mary Sofia Coppola, daughter of writer-director Francis Ford Coppola, but he gets sucked back into the vortex of Mob mayhem thanks to the machinations of ruthless Joey Zaza Joe Mantegna, whose minions include Vincent Andy Garcia, the illegitimate son of Michael’s late brother Sonny. Also involved in the intrigue is an old Italian don played by Eli Wallach, and the film’s third act brings Michael and family to their ancestral homeland for an extended confrontation that climaxes explosively against the backdrop of a colorful ballet performance. Pacino, not unexpectedly, is magnificent as the aging Godfather -- weary, physically ill, but still very much a force to be reckoned with. Despite his cold-blooded ruthlessness, Michael has finally become a sympathetic character, and Coppola takes pains to make him a tragic protagonist whose last great triumph occurs simultaneously with his most heartbreaking defeat. Garcia, whose trademark intensity rivals Pacino’s, hasn’t got all that much to do, but he acquits himself handily and contributes several memorable moments. The film’s only weak link -- and the one mentioned by critics in review after review -- is Sofia Coppola, whose performance as Mary is hopelessly inadequate. But a single supporting character doesn’t mean all that much in a movie of such epic scope, and Part III brings the Corleone saga to an altogether satisfactory conclusion.
All Movie Guide - Lucia Bozzola
The Godfather Part III is both a continuation of and commentary on the first two films, reuniting stars Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, and Talia Shire, as well as writer Mario Puzo, cinematographer Gordon Willis, and production designer Dean Tavoularis. Coppola transfers the action from gray Lake Tahoe to the burnished browns and blacks of New York, as the near-mythically powerful and wealthy Michael Corleone attempts to make the family business fully legit. Violently revisiting famed set pieces, particularly Part II's Little Italy assassination and Part I's baptism, Coppola reveals the depth of Mafia corruption in hallowed institutions and the utter venality of the next mobster generation. The Corleone saga's operatic tone reaches its appropriate climax at the opera, while Michael's silent scream and lonely end eloquently attest to the psychological as well as physical cost of putting Family before family. Although Pacino's energetic gravitas earned praise and Andy Garcia's trigger-happy Vincent was a star-maker, critics hammered last-minute substitute Sofia Coppola for ailing Winona Ryder, and the cumbersome plot. Still, The Godfather Part III earned seven Oscar nominations including Best Picture and Willis' first nod for the groundbreakingly shot trilogy, and respectable if unspectacular grosses.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/24/2005
  • UPC: 097363231844
  • Original Release: 1990
  • Rating:

  • Source: Paramount
  • Region Code: 1
  • Aspect Ratio: Theatre Wide-Screen (1.85.1)
  • Presentation: Wide Screen
  • Sound: Dolby Digital Stereo, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround
  • Language: English, Français
  • Time: 2:50:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Al Pacino Michael Corleone
Diane Keaton Kay Adams
Talia Shire Connie Corleone Rizzi
Andy Garcia Vincent Mancini
Eli Wallach Don Altobello
Sofia Coppola Mary Corleone
Joe Mantegna Joey Zaza
George Hamilton B.J. Barrison
Bridget Fonda Grace Hamilton
Raf Vallone Cardinal Lamberto
Franc D'Ambrosio Anthony Corleone
Donal Donnelly Archbishop Gilday
Richard Bright Al Neri
Helmut Berger Frederick Keinszig
Don Novello Dominic Abbandando
John Savage Andrew Hagan
Franco Citti Calo
Mario Donatone Mesca
Vittorio Duse Don Tommasino
Enzo Robutti Licio Lucchesi
Michele Russo Spara
Al Martino Johnny Fontane
Robert Cicchini Lou Penning
Rogerio Miranda Twin Bodyguard Armand
John Abineri Hamilton Banker
Diane Agostini Woman with Child at Street Fair
Vito Antuofermo Anthony "The Ant" Squigliaro
Rick Aviles Mark #1
Tere L. Baker Teresa Hagen
Francesco Paolo Bellante Autista di Don Tommasino
Ida Bemardini Woman in Cafe
Nicky Blair Nicky the Casino Host
Michael Boccio Father of Soccer Player
Michael Bowen Mark #2
Willie Brown Party Politician
Carmine Caridi Albert Volpe
Jessica Di Cicco Child
Gregory Corso Unruly Stockholder
Don Costello Frank Romano
Mimmo Cuticchio Puppet Narrator
James D. Damiano Man Playing Soccer
Joe Drago Party Security
Brian Freilino Stockholder
Maggie Goz Cafe Woman No. 2
Anthony Guidera Anthony the Bodyguard
Brett Halsey Douglas Michaelson
Richard Honigman Party Reporter
Santo Indelicato Guardie del Carpo
David Hume Kennerly Party Photographer
Mickey Knox Marty Parisi
Luigi Laezza Keinszig Killer
Jeannie Linero Lucy Mancini
Marino Masé Lupe
Carlos Miranda Twin Bodyguard Francesco
Jeanne Savarino Pesch Francesca Corleone
Beppe Pianiti Keinszig Killer
Paco Reconti Gesu
Remo Remotti Camerlengo Cardinal/Cardinal - Sistine
Al Ruscio Leo Cuneo
Dado Ruspoli Vanni
Valeria Sabel Sister Vincenza
Geanne Savarino Rosary and Anne Mane
Janet Savarino-Smith Kathryn Corleone
Catherine Scorsese Woman in Cafe
Simonetta Stefanelli Apollonia (uncredited)
Frank Tarsia Frankie, the Bodyguard
Gabriele Torrei Enzo the Baker
Robert Vento Father John
Technical Credits
Francis Ford Coppola Director, Co-producer, Screenwriter
Milena Canonero Costumes/Costume Designer
Lawrence James Cavanaugh Special Effects
Carmine Coppola Score Composer
Steve M. Davison Stunts
Gary Fettis Set Decoration/Design
Gray Fredrickson Co-producer
Lisa Fruchtman Editor
Fred Fuchs Executive Producer, Producer
Franco Fumagalli Set Decoration/Design
Nicholas Gage Executive Producer, Producer
Marina Gefter Associate Producer
Buddy Joe Hooker Stunts
Tom Lucas Makeup
Barry Malkin Editor
Charles B. Mulvehill Co-producer
Walter Murch Editor
Vincent Patrick Screenwriter
Mario Puzo Screenwriter
Dean Riesner Screenwriter
Fred Roos Co-producer
Fabrizio Sforza Makeup
R. Bruce Steinheimer Special Effects
Alex Tavoularis Art Director
Dean Tavoularis Production Designer
Gordon Willis Cinematographer
Clive Winter Sound/Sound Designer
Read More Show Less

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Michael's Letter [5:59]
2. Party At Michael's Apartment [8:32]
3. Anthony's Decision [8:23]
4. The Trouble Between Vincent And Joey Zasa [9:24]
5. Who Sent You? [7:00]
6. The Archbishop Asks For Michael's Help [3:33]
7. Shareholder's Meeting [6:30]
8. The Vatican Bank, Rome [4:00]
9. Atlantic City Massacre [10:40]
10. Just When I Thought I Was Out... [8:28]
11. Mary Visits Vincent At The Club [3:51]
12. Street Fair [3:13]
13. Michael At The Hospital [3:33]
14. Return To Sicily [1:40]
15. Michael Tells Vincent His Plan [8:07]
16. Confession [5:09]
17. Michael Shows Kay Sicily [11:21]
18. Pope John Paul The First [3:17]
19. Give Me A Chance To Redeem Myself [10:40]
20. Teatro Massimo [2:37]
21. Cavalleria Rusticana [6:10]
22. Revenge [5:18]
23. Finale On The Steps [9:04]
24. The Death Of Michael Corleone [8:52]
25. End Credits [5:00]
Read More Show Less

Menu

Side #1 --
   Play Film
   Set Up
      Audio Selection
         English 5.1 Surround
         French
         Commentary By Francis Ford Coppola
      Subtitle Selection
         English
         Subtitles: None
   Scene Selection
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    ''THUNDER CAN'T HURT! HARMLESS NOISE!!!''

    This film isn't really as horrible as it was made to be at the time, but it's also still a poor successor to the first two Godfather films. Part of the fault lies with Francis Ford Coppola, who was a markedly different director post-''Apocalypse Now'' [that silly helicopter attack in Atlantic City would never have made it into the first two]. The rest of the fault lies with Al Pacino, who despite still being a masterful actor, shows none of the cold-blooded subtlety that made Michael Corleone such a memorable screen character. Instead he's in full ''HOO-HAH'' mode, as though this were a warm-up for his Oscar-winning role in ''Scent of a Woman.'' Andy Garcia and Eli Wallach are great additions to the ensemble, it's fantastic to see Diane Keaton back again, and the less said about George Hamilton and Sofia Coppola the better.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    better than the second.

    Personally, I do not agree with the people who said that the 3rd installment in the Godfather trilogy was a disappointment. I actually felt that it was very good, and I loved the ending. However, though, I felt that the plot was slightly difficult to understand.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2004

    It was ok

    this was a good movie. Now beyond that their are many little things. The plot was kind of confusing. And in all of my life i have never seen a worse ending it ticked me off so much to see Micheal Carleone die like that. Other than that it was a really good movie

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2004

    eh

    what do you get when you have the acting talents or andy garica, al pacino, and diane keaton.a 5 star movie....... what do yuo get when you have the acting talents of george hamilton, joe mantagna, and sophia coppola...a 1 star movie.... add them together and u have a 5 i miss robert duvall, they shuld make a spin off of it with tom hagen as the lead....or not

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2003

    great movie

    One of the best movies ever. Pacino is awesome. This of is great on it's own because of it's differences from the other movies. Vincent was Andy Garcia's best.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2003

    Not Worthy of the ''Godfather'' title

    Ditto to the previous review. I want to add: What was with the incest plot? And WHY did Michael Corleone die blind and alone? This sequel blew.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2002

    Godfather 3 : The Vengeance Strikes Back?

    Coppola's last Godfather movie. Pacino is, as always, professional though he played a Michael whose judgement was breathtakingly impaired if compared with Godfather II. It was a pity Coppola put his own daughter (Sofia) in a movie & allowed her to look so wooden in the role, it harmed the film too. Andy Garcia (Vincent) plays a beleivable thug with Santino's temper but not an authentic Don. Eli Wallach (Altobelli) was a neatly poisonous and treacherous avuncular figure. Raf Vallone (Lamberto) still sports a beguiling pumpkin smile. As a sequel to the two great movies, I and II, this one has little to commend it. The pros do what they can but the plot is somewhat muddled and much of the movie is spent in regretful reflection by Pacino. Odd because he uses the line ''It's the price we pay for the life we've chosen.'' You'd think he'd beleive it himself by now. Robert Duvall was sadly missed as Mikey's right-hand man. The wet-jobs (assassinations) were poor in logistic terms and execution (no pun intented). A minor point but when we are told someone is ''the best'' or ''never fails'' then let's see what ''the best'' looks like. Summing up; Michael realises that violence begats more violence and try as he might he can't wipe away the sins of the past and disentangle himself from the brutal criminality which made him so wealthy and thus powerful. Not really a competitor for it's forerunners, handy if you want to burn 3 hours though.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews