The Grapes of Wrath

( 8 )

Overview

The adaptation of Nobel Prize-winner John Steinbeck's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of dirt-poor Dust Bowl migrants by 4-time Oscar-winning director John Ford starred Henry Fonda as Tom Joad, who opens the movie returning to his Oklahoma home after serving jail time for manslaughter. En route, Tom meets family friend Casey John Carradine, a former preacher who warns Tom that dust storms, crop failures, and new agricultural methods have financially decimated the once prosperous Oklahoma farmland. Upon returning to ...
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DVD (Ford on Fox Collection)
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Overview

The adaptation of Nobel Prize-winner John Steinbeck's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of dirt-poor Dust Bowl migrants by 4-time Oscar-winning director John Ford starred Henry Fonda as Tom Joad, who opens the movie returning to his Oklahoma home after serving jail time for manslaughter. En route, Tom meets family friend Casey John Carradine, a former preacher who warns Tom that dust storms, crop failures, and new agricultural methods have financially decimated the once prosperous Oklahoma farmland. Upon returning to his family farm, Tom is greeted by his mother Oscar-winner Jane Darwell, who tells him that the family is packing up for the "promised land" of California. Warned that they shouldn't expect a warm welcome in California--they've already seen the caravan of dispirited farmers, heading back home after striking out at finding work--the Joads push on all the same. Their first stop is a wretched migrant camp, full of starving children and surrounded by armed guards. Further down the road, the Joads drive into an idyllic government camp, with clean lodging, indoor plumbing, and a self-governing clientele. When Tom ultimately bids goodbye to his mother, who asks him where he'll go, he delivers the film's most famous speech: "I'll be all around...Wherever there's a fight so hungry people can eat...Whenever there's a cop beating a guy, I'll be there...And when the people are eatin' the stuff they raise and livin' in the houses they build. I'll be there too."
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Special Features

Audio commentary by film historian Joseph McBride and Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw; U.K. prologue; Darryl F. Zanuck: 20th Century Filmmaker as seen on Biography on the A&E Network; Restoration comparison; Original theatrical trailer; Still gallery; Fox Movietone News: 1934 - Worst Drought in Many Years Hits Middle West, Midwest Drought Distress Becomes National Disaster, Outlaws; 1941 - Roosevelt Lauds Motion Pictures at Academy Fete
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Bruce Eder
John Ford's The Grapes of Wrath is arguably the director's greatest movie, and the rare Hollywood film superior to its literary source (a view shared by the novel's author, John Steinbeck). Indeed, it is the movie that sums up the impact of the Great Depression, at least on rural America, better than any other film of its time (and there were hundreds that tried, by everyone from Frank Capra to Preston Sturges). From the opening shot of Tom Joad's return to the ruined land where he grew up, the movie is a study of people whose dreams and hopes wither away like the drought-stricken crops. Yet Ford managed to make a movie that wasn't utterly pessimistic, despite its story and setting: the performers and script availed him of indomitable characters, convincingly portrayed, with the result that even the most cynical viewers were persuaded of Ford's artistic vision. Henry Fonda, who'd been an up-and-coming leading man, solidified his image as an upright hero with an almost mystical bent in his portrayal of Tom Joad; Jane Darwell became the archetypal rural matriarch; and even the bit players, such as Ward Bond and Grant Mitchell, got relatively rare opportunities to play against their usual types as beneficent characters. The movie became a strange case of fiction transcending fact, as Ford's images (photographed by the great cinematographer Gregg Toland) became more representative of the period than most documentary photography. Countless filmmakers have quoted from The Grapes of Wrath (there's a very funny audio-visual reference in Close Encounters of the Third Kind), and Ford himself never made a more compelling social statement despite several attempts (The Sun Shines Bright, Sergeant Rutledge, and others) over the next 20 years.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 12/4/2007
  • UPC: 024543482642
  • Original Release: 1940
  • Rating:

  • Source: Fox Searchlight
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Ford on Fox Collection
  • Time: 2:09:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 1,215

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Henry Fonda Tom Joad
Jane Darwell Ma Joad
John Carradine Casey
Charles Grapewin Grandpa Joad
Doris Bowden Rosasham
John Qualen Muley Graves
Russell Simpson Pa Joad
O.Z. Whitehead Al
Eddie Quillan Connie Rivers
Zeffie Tilbury Gramma
Frank Sully Noah
Frank Darien Uncle John
Darryl Hickman Winfield Joad
Shirley Mills Ruth Joad
Roger Imhof Thomas
Grant Mitchell Caretaker
Charles D. Brown Wilkie
John Arledge Davis
Wally Albright Boy Who Ate
Erville Alderson Arkansas Storekeeper
Arthur Aylesworth Father
Irving Bacon Conductor
Trevor Bardette Jule
Ward Bond Policeman
George Breakston Boy
Cliff Clark Townsman
Shirley "Muggsy" Coates
Harry Cording
Ralph Dunn Deputy
Thornton Edwards Motor Cop
Frank Faylen Tim Wallace
Pat Flaherty
James Flavin Guard
Francis Ford
Paul Guilfoyle Floyd
William Haade Deputy Driver
Ben Hall
Herbert Heywood
Robert E. Homans Spencer
David Hilary Hughes Frank
Selmar Jackson Inspector
Hollis Jewell Muley's Son
Rex Lease Cop
Mae Marsh Floyd's Wife
Louis Mason Man in Camp
Walter McGrail Gang Leader
Kitty McHugh Mae
Charles B. Middleton Leader
Walter Miller New Mexico Border Guard
Adrian Morris Agent
Frank O'Connor
George O'Hara Clerk
Ted Oliver State Policeman
Inez Palange Woman in Camp
William Pawley Bill
Gaylord "Steve" Pendleton
Steve Pendleton Attendant
Jack Pennick Camp helper
Dick Rich
Gloria Roy Waitress
Peggy Ryan Hungry Girl
Joe Sawyer Accountant
Joseph Sauer Accountant
Robert "Buddy" Shaw Gas Station Attendant
Lee Shumway
Georgia Simmons Woman
Harry Strang Fred the Truck Driver
Paul Sutton
Charles Tannen Joe
Harry Tenbrook Deputy/Troublemaker
Harry Tyler Bert
Tom Tyler Sheriff
Eddy Waller Proprietor
Norman Willis Joe
Technical Credits
John Ford Director
Richard Day Art Director
Roger Heman Sound/Sound Designer
Nunnally Johnson Screenwriter
Mark-Lee Kirk Art Director
George Leverett Sound/Sound Designer
Thomas K. Little Set Decoration/Design
Alfred Newman Score Composer, Musical Direction/Supervision
Edward O'Fearna Asst. Director
Robert L. Simpson Editor
John Steinbeck Source Author
Gregg Toland Cinematographer
Gwen Wakeling Costumes/Costume Designer
Darryl F. Zanuck Producer
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Scene Index

Disc #1, Side A -- The Ford at Fox Collection: The Grapes of Wrath - Feature
1. Main Titles [1:04]
2. Hitchin' a Ride [3:14]
3. Losing the Cell [5:27]
4. Emptiness [3:36]
5. Muley's Story [7:02]
6. Hidin' Out [2:11]
7. California Promise [3:16]
8. Joad Reunion [2:21]
9. Letting Go [2:30]
10. "I Belong Here!" [5:13]
11. Don't Look Back [5:07]
12. Employment Equation [5:22]
13. A Ten Cent Loaf [4:05]
14. California Border [4:24]
15. Driving Through the Desert [5:20]
16. Beautiful Valley [2:09]
17. A Fair Share [6:32]
18. Business Practices [4:27]
19. No More Okies [4:12]
20. A Job [6:57]
21. Uprising [7:46]
22. "Nothing to Trust" [4:40]
23. Gone for Good [2:17]
24. A Stroke of Luck [5:19]
25. Word of Warning [2:40]
26. Dance Night [3:49]
27. The Red River Valley [3:02]
28. On the Trail [3:28]
29. "I'll Be Everywhere" [5:00]
30. Good-bye [1:13]
31. "Twenty Days Work" [1:53]
32. "We're the People That Live" [3:01]
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Menu

Disc #1, Side A -- The Ford at Fox Collection: The Grapes of Wrath - Feature
   Play
   Language Selection
      Spoken Languages: English Stereo
      Spoken Languages: English Mono
      Spoken Languages: Spanish Mono
      Spoken Languages: Commentary
      Subtitles: English
      Subtitles: Spanish
      Subtitles: French
      Subtitles: None
   Scene Selection
   Special Features
      Commentary by Joseph Mc Bride (Film Scholar) and Susan Shillinglaw (John Steinbeck Scholar)
         Play
      UK Prologue
         Play
Disc #1, Side B -- The Ford at Fox Collection: The Grapes of Wrath - Supplemental
   Biography: Darryl F. Zanuck, 20th Century Filmmaker
   Restoration Comparison
      Next
   Theatrical Trailer
   Fox Movietone News
      1934: "Worst Drought in Many Years Hits Middle West"
      1934: "Drought Distress Is Increasing in the Mid-West"
      1934: "Mid-West Drought Distress Becomes National Disaster"
      1934: Outtakes
      1941: "Roosevelt Lauds Motion Pictures at Academy Fete"
   Still Gallery
   Studio Classics
      All About Eve
      An Affair to Remember
      The Day the Earth Stood Still
      The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
      My Darling Clementine
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

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(6)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 7 of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Fascinating

    In 1984, I taught The Grapes of Wrath as a student teacher. I loved it then, but I never had another chance to re-read it until recently. I marvelled at it again and wanted to see this movie. To me, the added features of this DVD makes it a great purchase. Besides the original movie, it has another full movie version with voice overs from a Steinbeck expert and a John Ford (director) expert. Every single part of the movie stays the same, and they take you into the making of it, the background of the times, the politics of it, and the personalities involved in it. I was absolutely glued to the screen. This is definitely for anyone who loves the book, is interested in the time period, and who admires the contribution Steinbeck made to raising awareness of this difficult time in American history.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Poignant And Wonderful

    One of the few times in history a film has captured and indeed surpassed the impact of the source novel. A hard, close look at the 'dustbowl' time period of the Great Depression, Ford's film is stark, gripping, and unforgetable.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    This story is a classic American novel transformed magnificently into a stunning film, one of the best ever made in Hollywood, directed by John Ford and staring Henry Fonda. This team had an earlier success in another classic film, The Informer.

    This is one of Henry Fonda's strongest acting roles. The film starts as Fonda, just released from prison is returning home to Oklahoma only to find his family no longer able to support themselves as small time dirt farmers, the victims of larger conglamorates which are squeezing them to abandon their land and homes. The plot is fueled by their desperation and a flyer promising high pay in California as migrant grape pickers. It is a story so deep in the consciousness of Americans, concerning exploited workers, beginning here and continuing through the remaining part of the century, reminding us of the plight of immigrant workers in most states in the U.S. Only these Oklahoma farmers are not really immigrants but Americans who have already survived the earlier years of American settlement. It is a story not of simply what we do to others but of what we do to our own. An unforgetable commentary on how the rich exploit the poor that resulted in the beginning of the labor movement in the U.S. It reminds us of how our unions were born out of the necessity of poor people to survive inhuman conditions that favored the rich as they consistently took advantage and systematically exploited the poor. The quiet strength of Henry Fonda and his fierce independence depicts all that we love in the American character. Throughout this film in one brutal scene after another Fonda shows courage, humor, intelligence and determination to fight back against those that would destroy his family and the famlies around him. The other performers give brillant cameo performances. In all. this is an remarkable film drawing out our emotions and sympathy for these particular down to earth poor people and the downtrodden everywhere. Unfortunately, the rich continue to exploit all of us and this film makes us painfully aware that we are still up against the same struggle today when we consider how large corporations like banks, insurance companies and oil giants pretend to act in our interest while they rob us blind. See this film. It's a treat and an eye opener.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted October 5, 2010

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    Posted February 23, 2011

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    Posted December 12, 2009

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 7 of 8 Customer Reviews