Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

3.8 11
Director: Robert Markowitz, Toby Stephens, Mira Sorvino, Paul Rudd

Cast: Robert Markowitz, Toby Stephens, Mira Sorvino, Paul Rudd


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F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece, often regarded as one of the greatest American novels of the 20th century, is brought to the screen in this made-for-TV feature, produced in collaboration with the A&E Cable Network in the United States, and Granada Entertainment in Great Britain. Nick Carraway (Paul Rudd) is a young bond salesman who rents a cottage near the mansion


F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece, often regarded as one of the greatest American novels of the 20th century, is brought to the screen in this made-for-TV feature, produced in collaboration with the A&E Cable Network in the United States, and Granada Entertainment in Great Britain. Nick Carraway (Paul Rudd) is a young bond salesman who rents a cottage near the mansion of the wealthy but reclusive Jay Gatsby (Toby Stephens). In time, Nick gets to know his neighbor, who has accumulated a vast fortune through vague, suspect means, but has carefully forged an outward image of refinement and charm. Years ago, before he left to fight in World War I, Gatsby was a poor man named Gatz and was in love with a beautiful woman from a wealthy family, Daisy (Mira Sorvino). When he returned, Gatz was determined to remake himself so that he might be seen fit to someday win her hand, even though Daisy had by this time married the socially prominent but boorish Tom Buchanan (Martin Donovan). Gatsby has yet to give up on his romantic dream and enlists Nick, who is distantly related to Daisy, in his plan. This production marked the fourth time that The Great Gatsby had been committed to film -- the best known version being Jack Clayton's 1974 adaptation, featuring Robert Redford as Gatsby and Mia Farrow as Daisy.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Mike Cummings
This made-for-TV production faithfully adapts F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel of Jazz Age glamour, decadence, and star-crossed love. While developing the novel's thesis -- the death of the American dream and the man who dreams it -- director Robert Markowitz and his staff dress up the film with the elegant trappings of the gentry and the nouveaux riches, including sprawling estates, vintage cars, chic fashions, and clubby restaurants and watering holes. The cinematography is stunning, whether fixed on the calming peace of a falling sun or on the wrenching horror of a body scuffed raw on pavement by a hit-and-run car. Composer Carl Davis distinguishes the film with a brilliant score of pulsating jazz and wistful mood music. British actor Toby Stephens portrays the main character, Jay Gatsby, a Jew and a Midwesterner by birth. To win back the woman he once loved -- the style-conscious, money-loving Daisy Buchanan (Mira Sorvino), who married wealth and status in the person of upper-crust snob and bigot Tom Buchanan (Martin Donovan) -- Gatsby doffs his Jewish name (Jimmy Gatz), amasses a fortune through bootlegging and other illegal activities, and moves into a mansion on West Egg, Long Island, just across the water from Daisy's home on East Egg. Then he has Daisy's cousin, Nick Carraway (Paul Rudd, re-introduce him to Daisy. Stephens' portrayal is mediocre for those who interpret Gatsby as mysterious, articulate, urbane, insouciant. But his portrayal is just right for those who interpret him as more Midwestern than Eastern, more plebeian than aristocrat. The other actors -- Sorvino, Donovan, Rudd and those in supporting roles -- all perform capably. Overall, A&E's Great Gatsby is a worthy production that deserves more praise than criticism.

Product Details

Release Date:
Original Release:
A&E Home Video
[Dolby Digital Stereo]
Sales rank:

Special Features

Closed Caption; Biography: F. Scott Fitzgerald

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Toby Stephens Jay Gatsby
Mira Sorvino Daisy Buchanan
Paul Rudd Nick Buchanan
Martin Donovan Tom Buchanan
Francie Swift Jordan Baker
Heather Goldenhersch Myrtle
Matt Malloy Klipspringer
Richard Jutras Actor
Jerry Grayson Actor
Janine Theriault Actor
Ernie Jackson Actor
Paul Hopkins Actor
Burtt Harris Actor

Technical Credits
Robert Markowitz Director
Craig McNeil Producer
David Roessell Producer
John McLaughlin Screenwriter
F. Scott Fitzgerald Source Author
David Beatty Editor
Carl Davis Score Composer
Guy Dufaux Cinematographer
Nicoletta Massone Costumes/Costume Designer
Taavo Soodor Production Designer
Ilene Starger Casting

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Great Gatsby
1. Dinner With The Buchanans [8:52]
2. Party In Manhattan [6:13]
3. 'Gatsby, What Gatsby?' [3:29]
4. Gatsby's Party [6:14]
5. A Little Favor [14:23]
6. Past Love [6:13]
7. Trouble Begins [9:18]
8. Uncovered Truth [9:06]
9. Accident [8:26]
10. In The Pool [3:14]
11. Aftermath [4:34]
12. Already Behind Him [8:23]
13. Chapter 13 [5:36]

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The Great Gatsby 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As an added bonus, the A&E biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald is included on this DVD! And it is excellent. (Buy it for that if nothing else, and use bits of the film to supplement the book.) I felt the movie was a close addaptation of the book, and I liked the portrayals of Daisy, Nick and Gatsby better in this version. The Robert Redford version does have better parties, but I like the convenience of a DVD to show to classes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The 2000 version of The Great Gatsby is not worth seeing. Most of the acting is lame, the script is weak and and parts are a bit corny. However, the 1974 version with Robert Redford is much better and I suggest that one instead.
fleurfairy More than 1 year ago
The casting in this production is strange. I liked Toby Stephens' Gatsby even those he's not American. His American accent is almost flawless and he does look the part. I think Stephens appropriately conveyed Gatsby's phoniness and his desperation. I did not understand why they cast Mira Sorvino as Daisy. Her voice was not "full of money", she was not what I imagined Daisy to look like, she's Italian-American - not a WASP, and she had long hair instead of the bob. Her performance was dreadful acting-wise. I do not think she had a handle on who exactly Daisy Buchanan was. It's like she had never read the book. I liked the casting of Paul Rudd as Nick, but he could have developed the character further. I just felt that this production could have been so much better if the filmmakers had really studied the novel more and made better casting choices. I doubt there will ever be a film of The Great Gatsby that lives up to the novel.
dj137 More than 1 year ago
Would highly recommend reading the book first
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best movie that I have seen portraying ''The Great Gatsby''. This novel is a masterpiece and the acting is just as the book describes. I recommend this movie to eveyone, but remember to read to read the book before hand:)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yeah....I read the novel awhile back and saw the older movie with Robert Redford/Mia Farrow. After seeing this one I just think it they should have been more careful when picking actors for the part of certain character. Over all it's still pretty accurate to the first movie.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was looking for a DVD of The Great Gatsby to show to my classes since we'd read the book. Unable to find the Robert Redford version in time, I bought this one. Overall, I thought this was a very good presentation. There were a few minor details that were different than I expected, but I thought the movie captured the book rather well, and brought in most of the major themes. Although the performances were not award-winning, they were definitely solid and conveyed the subtextual interplay between characters well. All in all, I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in watching The Great Gatsby.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read the book and seen both movie versions and i have to say that I loved the 2000 edition of the movie. Me being a teenager it was an easier view. I loved the book but if I just saw the first version I would of thought it was really boring, which is a shame.
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