The Great Train Robbery

( 1 )

Overview

This DVD presents two different versions of the seminal Western The Great Train Robbery. In addition to the original print, there is a digitally enhanced version that contains some scenes tinted in color. Also included are a handful of other silent Westerns. All of the films are presented in the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1. English soundtracks are rendered in Dolby Digital Mono. There are no supplemental materials of any consequence, but viewers with an interest in film history should find this ...
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DVD (Black & White)
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Overview

This DVD presents two different versions of the seminal Western The Great Train Robbery. In addition to the original print, there is a digitally enhanced version that contains some scenes tinted in color. Also included are a handful of other silent Westerns. All of the films are presented in the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1. English soundtracks are rendered in Dolby Digital Mono. There are no supplemental materials of any consequence, but viewers with an interest in film history should find this release quite worthwhile.
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Special Features

Contains two versions of this historically significant Western: the original silent archival version provided by the Library of Congress and a digitally enhanced version with a new music and effects track and color-tinted sequences; Bonus silent Western classics: "The Heart of Texas Ryan" (1916), "Tumbleweeds" (1925), "The Battle of Elderbush Gulch" (1916)
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
There is some doubt as to whether all of The Great Train Robbery's many innovations were actually the first of their kind, but there's no question that Edwin S. Porter's seminal 1903 Western was the first definitive evidence of the power of film editing in the service of a story. Before The Great Train Robbery, most films were either actualities (short documents of prominent people, places, or events) or recorded stage performances. Porter, influenced by the cruder, tableaux-based narrative films of French film pioneer Georges Méliès, created a sensation by coupling a strong story (in this case based on a true event) with expressive editing techniques. The film contains a staggering array of firsts or near-firsts: it was the first to use title cards, an ellipsis, and a panning shot, and probably the first to use a script. More important, it was one of the first works to take advantage of film's unique power to move an audience across time and space with continuity editing and cross-cutting among different stories -- techniques that have become the cornerstones of modern cinematic language. The film was also a huge popular success, helping to reduce skepticism about the future of the movie industry. (Porter would go on to give D.W. Griffith -- the man who would extend Porter's experiments in cross-cutting to full-length narrative features -- his first job: as an actor.) Ironically, The Great Train Robbery's famous final image of a bandit's firing his pistol at the audience was not a part of the film's story, and could have been inserted by exhibitors at either the beginning or the end of the film, but early audiences' tumultuous reaction to it may well have marked the start of America's love affair with the movies.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 12/16/2003
  • UPC: 089859829727
  • Original Release: 1903
  • Rating:

  • Source: Vci Video
  • Region Code: 0
  • Aspect Ratio: Pre-1954 Standard (1.33.1)
  • Presentation: Black & White
  • Sound: silent, Dolby Digital Mono
  • Time: 3:04:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 26,123

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Gilbert M. Anderson Bandit,
George Barnes Bandit
A.C. Abadie Sheriff
Walter Cameron Sheriff
Morgan Jones
Tom London
Marie Murray Dance-Hall Dancer
Mary Snow Little Girl
Technical Credits
Edwin S. Porter Director, Cinematographer, Screenwriter
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Menu

Side #1 --
   Play All
   Movie Selection
      The Great Train Robbery
         Original Library of Congress Version (Black & White - Silent)
         Digitally Enhanced Version (Tinted With Music & Effects Soundtrack)
      The Heart of Texas Ryan
      Tumbleweeds
      Battle of Elderbush Gulch
      Bonus Poem
   Bios
      G.M. "Broncho Billy" Anderson
      Tom Mix
      William S. Hart
   Westerns Trailers
   DVD-ROM Features
      www.vcientertainment.com
      www.loc.gov
      www.ok-history.mus.ok.us/mus-sites/masnum31.htm
      www.cowboyhalloffame.org
      G.M. "Broncho Billy" Full Bio
      Tom Mix Full Bio
      William S. Hart Full Bio
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Customer Reviews

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    Posted January 16, 2010

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