Hidden Blade
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The Hidden Blade

4.6 3
Director: Yoji Yamada

Cast: Masatoshi Nagase, Takako Matsu, Yukiyoshi Ozawa

     
 

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The Hidden Blade concerns Yaichiro, a warrior who must leave his family in the care of two other samurai after he answers a request for his services in another town. Muenezo and Samon do their best to protect the family when they come under attack during Yaichiro's absence.

Overview

The Hidden Blade concerns Yaichiro, a warrior who must leave his family in the care of two other samurai after he answers a request for his services in another town. Muenezo and Samon do their best to protect the family when they come under attack during Yaichiro's absence.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/08/2006
UPC:
0842498020203
Original Release:
2004
Rating:
R
Source:
Tartan Video
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[DTS 5.1-Channel Surround Sound, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
2:12:00

Special Features

Behind the scenes with director Yoji Yamada; Berlin film festival premiere; Yoji Yamada press conference; Japanese theatrical trailer; U.S. theatrical trailer; English & Spanish Subtitles

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Masatoshi Nagase Munezo Katagirl
Takako Matsu Kie
Yukiyoshi Ozawa Yaichiro Hazama
Hidetaka Yoshioka Samon Shimada
Tomoko Tabata Shino
Tomoko Obata Shino
Reiko Takashima Hazama's Wife
Min Tanaka Kansai Toda
Nenji Kobayashi Ogata
Ken Ogata Hori, the Shogun

Technical Credits
Yoji Yamada Director,Screenwriter
Yoshitaka Asama Screenwriter
Mitsuo Degawa Art Director
Hiroshi Fukasawa Producer
Hiroshi Fukusawa Producer
Takeo Hisamatsu Producer
Iwao Ishii Editor
Kazumi Kishida Sound/Sound Designer
Kazuko Kurosawa Costumes/Costume Designer,Sound/Sound Designer
Mutsuo Naganuma Cinematographer
Yoshinobu Nishioka Art Director
Junichi Sakamoto Executive Producer
Junichi Sakomoto Executive Producer
Isao Tomita Score Composer
Ichiro Yamamoto Producer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Hidden Blade
1. Opening Credits [15:35]
2. Load! [10:35]
3. Kie Is Ill [9:07]
4. Scared of Samurai [8:51]
5. Solitery Confinement [15:27]
6. Drill [12:27]
7. Left on Her Own [1:16]
8. Sensai Toda [5:29]
9. Late Night Visit [5:35]
10. Hostages [7:08]
11. Not Wasting words [3:09]
12. Deceived? [10:45]
13. The Chief Retainer [2:35]
14. Cause of Death [5:42]
15. Going North [4:33]
16. End Credits [10:03]

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The Hidden Blade 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is only two fight scenes in this movie which may sound surprising for a samurai movie. But unlike many other violent samurai movies, this one has a soul. The protagonist is a regular samurai who follows the samurai law until he is made to duel with his imprisoned friend accused of being a traitor to the clan. Movie is made beautiful and you can't help noticing the beautiful background and the acting of each character is perfect. This is a more realistic samurai movie since the protagonist says he is "afraid to kill" eventhough he trained to defend and kill.
Sakka More than 1 year ago
If you know this director's earlier movie TWILIGHT SAMURAI, you pretty much know the plot of this one, too. Set in the mid-19th century--a time of transition near the end of the samurai era--a poor but honorable man is ordered to fight his good friend to the death. Some twists make the story new, but it is the details of everyday life and speech, the props and costumes, the sets and scenery, the subplots and the minor characters that make this movie truly memorable. There is beauty and love here everywhere you look. And while the personal corruption of high officials and leaders of the clan reveal how far the social system that had ruled Japan for centuries had fallen from its own ideals, the kindness and self-sacrifice of ordinary people make this time, for all its stiff rigidity and needless suffering, seem worth remembering fondly and with pride. The women in particular are marvelous, not for being lovely objects, but as determined caring human beings. This, I believe is truly Japanese. There is action, too--though nothing like as much as you often find in Japanese costume epics--just believable combat between two opponents of real but limited skill, who both very much desire to stay alive. To me, everything about this movie was interesting and convincing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago