Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

4.8 19
Director: Peter Jackson

Cast: Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman, Richard Armitage

     
 

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Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) joins Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and a band of dwarves led by the brave Thorin (Richard Armitage) on a treacherous quest to reclaim their mountain home from the fierce dragon Smaug in this epic fantasy adventure adapted from J.R.R. Tolkien's

Overview

Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) joins Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and a band of dwarves led by the brave Thorin (Richard Armitage) on a treacherous quest to reclaim their mountain home from the fierce dragon Smaug in this epic fantasy adventure adapted from J.R.R. Tolkien's beloved novel by the creative forces behind the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Long before Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) made his arduous journey to Mordor, his brave uncle Bilbo embarked on an adventure for the ages. Bilbo's story gets under way when the great wizard Gandalf appears at his front gate with a most unusual offer. Displaced from their massive fortress in the Lonely Mountain by Smaug - a greedy dragon who coveted their gold - a community of noble dwarves were decimated by a surprise attack by monstrous orcs, whose dreaded leader the Pale Orc slew their king in a gruesome battle. Now, Thorin, the descendent of the king, is determined to reclaim his mountain kingdom for his people. Together with a fearless team of dwarves, Thorin and Gandalf recruit Bilbo to aid them in their quest since Hobbits have the unique ability to go undetected when they wish to. Before Bilbo, Gandalf, and the dwarves can reach The Lonely Mountain and defeat Smaug, however, they'll have to contend with trolls, goblins, stone giants, Gollum (Andy Serkis), and even the dreaded Pale Orc himself. Peter Jackson directs a screenplay he co-penned with Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Guillermo del Toro.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jason Buchanan
Visionary director Peter Jackson takes fantasy fans back to Middle-earth and beyond in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. A visually sumptuous, frequently thrilling companion piece to the Lord of the Rings trilogy, the first chapter of this new saga manages to maintain a satisfying sense of momentum once the proper introductions have been made, and rarely feels as cumbersome as its nearly three-hour running time would suggest. Although constant scenes of the questing group fleeing danger on majestic mountains, through sprawling fields, and in winding caverns occasionally dredge up a nagging sense of déjà vu, Jackson's kinetic camera work and flair for fantastical (and occasionally frightening) imagery are enough to evoke a sense of wonder all over again -- even if the group's penchant for getting out of harm's way at the last possible second grows a bit repetitive as the journey careens toward a dizzying climax. Long before Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) made his arduous journey to Mordor, his brave uncle Bilbo (Martin Freeman) embarked on an adventure for the ages. Bilbo's story gets under way when the great wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellen) appears at his front gate with a most unusual offer. Displaced from their massive fortress in the Lonely Mountain by Smaug, a greedy dragon who coveted their gold, a community of noble dwarves were decimated by a surprise attack by monstrous orcs, whose dreaded leader the Pale Orc slew their king in a gruesome battle. Now, Thorin (Richard Armitage), the descendent of the king, is determined to reclaim his mountain kingdom for his people. Together with a fearless group of dwarves, Thorin and Gandalf recruit Bilbo to help them in their quest since Hobbits have the unique ability to go undetected when they wish to. But reclaiming the Lonely Mountain from Smaug will be no small task, because before Bilbo, Gandalf, and the dwarves can reach the distant peak, they'll have to contend with trolls, goblins, stone giants, Gollum (Andy Serkis), and even the dreaded Pale Orc himself. While some might accuse the story of being slow to start, when placed in the context of a trilogy, Jackson and fellow screenwriters Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Guillermo del Toro do a commendable job of building momentum with lighthearted humor and big action. The laughs come early and often as Gandalf shows up on Bilbo's doorstep followed by a host of unruly dwarves, and the movie delivers thrills and sweeping spectacle as we learn how those boisterous dwarves were displaced from their mountaintop home by a greedy dragon and an army of orcs. Once Bilbo makes up his mind to join the group on their journey, the film hits a satisfying stride, with a number of gruesome threats giving Jackson and company the opportunity to flex their creative muscles. Shot with the same minute attention to detail that gave the Lord of the Rings trilogy such a classical feel, The Hobbit also possesses a strong visual connection to those films courtesy of returning cinematographer Andrew Lesnie, whose artful handling of light yields sumptuous images under the sun and moon alike. It's no revelation that The Hobbit is a special-effects-heavy movie, and while the CG animation in the Lord of the Rings looks impressive even a decade later, advances made in those ensuing ten years are apparent from the earliest scenes. From the rumbling rock giants to the elaborate underground realm of the goblins, the gifted animators and talented cast work hand in hand to make everything in this universe seem tangible. Meanwhile, some of those creations -- the malevolent Necromancer, snarling wolves, and the sinister Pale Orc in particular -- make the Wraiths of the Lord of the Rings trilogy look downright friendly by comparison, and might actually provide nightmare fodder when lunging at younger viewers in vivid 3D. Regarding the cast, Freeman is a fine anchor for the large ensemble. Warm, cautiously inquisitive, and displaying an amiable air of uncertain courage, his Bilbo is the kind of quick-to-smile hero that audiences love to root for; we instinctively begin to trust him as much as the wise Gandalf, despite the vocal doubts of head dwarf Thorin, played with evenhanded authority by Armitage. Although the distinctive personalities of the dwarves gradually meld together once the group leave Bilbo's dining room for the Lonely Mountain, individual quirks still make them a likeable crew, and there will likely be plenty of room to flesh out their identities over the course of the coming two films. McKellen is once again in top form as Gandalf, spouting grandfatherly wisdom and occasionally using his wizardry to help the questing group out of a tight jam. Former Doctor Who star Sylvester McCoy provides a welcome dose of comic relief as mushroom-addled wizard Radagast, and Andy Serkis makes Gollum every bit as tragic and terrifying as he was in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Many skeptics will still walk out of The Hobbit questioning Jackson's decision to turn a single novel into a sprawling, three-film epic. In many ways, it might have been preferable to have just one, shorter movie to balance out the intimidating girth of the cinematic leviathan of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. With the exception of his unwieldy King Kong remake, Jackson has generally proven to be a smart and efficient storyteller from the very beginning, and for the most part, his take on The Hobbit gallops along at an enjoyable stride. By using the Lonely Mountain sequences as the bookends for this first installment of the new trilogy, the screenwriters of The Hobbit manage to serve up an adventure that, while perhaps not complete in a literal sense, still offers a satisfying journey for fantasy fans while simultaneously laying the groundwork for the larger tale to come. Of course, it will be another two years until audiences can judge just how effectively Jackson, Boyens, Walsh, and del Toro have expanded this smaller story for the big screen, but if The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is any indicator of things to come, this trilogy could be every bit as wondrous and exciting as the one that preceded it.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/19/2013
UPC:
0794043165344
Original Release:
2012
Source:
New Line Home Video
Region Code:
1
Time:
2:49:00
Sales rank:
19,104

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ian McKellen Gandalf
Martin Freeman Bilbo
Richard Armitage Thorin
Ken Stott Balin
Graham McTavish Dwalin
William Kircher Bifur,Tom Troll
James Nesbitt Bofur
Stephen Hunter Bombur
Dean O'Gorman Fili
Aidan Turner Kili
John Callen Oin
Peter Hambleton Gloin,William Troll
Jed Brophy Nori
Mark Hadlow Dori,Bert Troll
Adam Brown Ori
Ian Holm Old Bilbo
Elijah Wood Frodo
Hugo Weaving Elrond
Cate Blanchett Galadriel
Christopher Lee Saruman
Andy Serkis Gollum
Sylvester McCoy Radagast
Barry Humphries Great Goblin
Jeffrey Thomas Thror
Mike Mizrahi Thrain
Lee Pace Thranduil
Manu Bennett Azog
Conan Stevens Bolg
John Rawls Yazneg
Stephen Ure Fimbul,Grinnah
Timothy Bartlett Master Worrywart
Bret McKenzie Lindir
Kiran Shah Goblin Scribe
Benedict Cumberbatch Necromancer
Glenn Boswell Dwarf Miner
Thomas Robins Young Thrain

Technical Credits
Peter Jackson Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Carolyn Blackwood Executive Producer
Scott Boland Casting
Philippa Boyens Co-producer,Screenwriter
Victoria Burrows Casting
Carolynne Cunningham Asst. Director,Producer
Weta Digital Animator
Matthew Dravitzki Associate Producer
Toby Emmerich Executive Producer
David Farmer Sound/Sound Designer
Guillermo del Toro Consultant/advisor,Screenwriter
Simon Harding Camera Operator
Dan Hennah Production Designer
Alan Horn Executive Producer
Amy Hubbard Casting
John Hubbard Casting
Tory Johnson Sound Mixer
Ken Kamins Executive Producer
Peter King Makeup
Andrew Lesnie Cinematographer
M*A*C Makeup
Ann Maskrey Costumes/Costume Designer
Brian Massey Art Director
Andy McLaren Art Director
Cameron McLean Camera Operator
Brad Mill Art Director
Eileen Moran Co-producer
Liz Mullane Casting
Terry Notary Choreography
Jabez Olssen Editor
Miranda Rivers Casting
Ann Robinson Casting
Howard Shore Score Composer
Richard Taylor Costumes/Costume Designer
Amanda Walker Associate Producer
Fran Walsh Producer,Screenwriter
Zane Weiner Producer
Weta Workshop Ltd. Makeup Special Effects
Dave Whitehead Sound/Sound Designer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
1. Chapter 1 [8:50]
2. Chapter 2 [4:07]
3. Chapter 3 [3:35]
4. Chapter 4 [4:15]
5. Chapter 5 [4:18]
6. Chapter 6 [8:04]
7. Chapter 7 [5:12]
8. Chapter 8 [5:13]
9. Chapter 9 [6:31]
10. Chapter 10 [5:04]
11. Chapter 11 [1:47]
12. Chapter 12 [10:46]
13. Chapter 13 [4:19]
14. Chapter 14 [3:52]
15. Chapter 15 [6:02]
16. Chapter 16 [1:40]
17. Chapter 17 [5:03]
18. Chapter 18 [3:13]
19. Chapter 19 [1:38]
20. Chapter 20 [6:46]
21. Chapter 21 [2:37]
22. Chapter 22 [6:05]
23. Chapter 23 [4:51]
24. Chapter 24 [2:53]
25. Chapter 25 [13:29]
26. Chapter 26 [1:57]
27. Chapter 27 [1:11]
28. Chapter 28 [4:21]
29. Chapter 29 [2:09]
30. Chapter 30 [2:49]
31. Chapter 31 [10:58]
32. Chapter 32 [5:29]
33. Chapter 33 [10:06]

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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
JerriNicci More than 1 year ago
I loved both the extra footage and the behind the scenes features. The menus are tastefully designed, although I did find the main menu screen intro to be just a little disorienting. The product comes in a beautiful case that looks like a book, with a holographic 3-D picture on the front. The only issue I have with the case is that the picture is on the wrong side for a book, but this was most likely done because most people are right-handed and would take the case off the shelf with their right hand and remove the inner casing from the cover with their left. If you want the 5-disc either as a Collector's item or because you enjoy watching behind the scenes footage, make sure you get this product! Any other listing, either on Barnes and Noble or another site, with a different product code is probably the 2-disc version. If you want the extended version, but don't care for the behind the scenes stuff and want to save money, I recommend you get the 2-disc.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great movie, and I am so happy I finally found this particular version. Couldn't find it hardly any place else.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Everything and more than expected for a wonderful movie.
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
I mean I like that we got see Middle Earth again. But as for the movie it was good, but not as good but still have its moments. Love the locations and music, etc.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this for all of the extras. That was the first part I watched, all nine hours! I thought they were wonderful!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Will definitely buy the Desolation of Smaug extended version with the CDs on how it was made.
Motowmgirl More than 1 year ago
For any Tolkien fan or for that matter any fan of fantasy and good story telling this is a movie to see.
Sybil625 More than 1 year ago
This is the director's cut, or expanded edition, with some extra scenes as well as the documentary discs - always good. Tolkien + Jackson = some really excellent entertainment.
jj_ohio More than 1 year ago
The additional scenes were a good addition. Though the movie certainly does not stay true to the book and takes liberties with the screenplay, it is an enjoyable trip to Middle Earth. Haven't looked at all the extras with this multi-dvd yet, but seem to be a nice bonus for either simple movie fans or regular LOTR fans. Yes, The Hobbit is not part of the Tolkien's trilogy, but it the foundation for those epics. Though I prefer the books and Tolkien's verbal imagery, this movie and I hope the installments to follow are well worth watching and being swept into Middle Earth.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great for everyone, fan of the books or not.
Flucky More than 1 year ago
Great introduction to the world of Hobbits, Hobbitown, dwarfs, wizards, elfs and goblins. I didn't think Jackson could pull it off but he did.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a huge Lord of the Rings fan. I own all three extend version and this first one in the trilogy does not disappoint. I still have not quite figure out all of the new/extended scenes yet.
Gandalf-The-Grey More than 1 year ago
Even MORE enjoyable than the standard edition!
joet37382013 More than 1 year ago
Best Movie Since The Lord Of The Rings
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EGHunter01 More than 1 year ago
Review title: Gory Grand Adventure. The protagonist is not prepared for the grand and gory adventure he is undertaking. Along the way he meets some challenges that assist him to empathize with those that have asked for his help. If you enjoy violence and gore you are sure to be attracted to this storyline, it has plenty of guts and gore to keep you at the edge of your seat; this is not for the faint of heart. You will join the protagonists and his newly acquired quote, unquote friends on a memorable adventure. The characters are so life like it with frighten you.