King's Speech

King's Speech

4.4 37
Director: Tom Hooper

Cast: Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, Helena Bonham Carter

     
 

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Emmy Award-winning director Tom Hooper (John Adams) teams with screenwriter David Seidler (Tucker: A Man and His Dreams) to tell the story of King George VI. When his older brother abdicates the throne, nervous-manneredSee more details below

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Overview

Emmy Award-winning director Tom Hooper (John Adams) teams with screenwriter David Seidler (Tucker: A Man and His Dreams) to tell the story of King George VI. When his older brother abdicates the throne, nervous-mannered successor George "Bertie" VI (Colin Firth) reluctantly dons the crown. Though his stutter soon raises concerns about his leadership skills, King George VI eventually comes into his own with the help of unconventional speech therapist Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush). Before long the king and Lionel have forged an unlikely bond, a bond that proves to have real strength when the United Kingdom is forced to flex its international might.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
Let's take a moment to consider the atypical career of Colin Firth. He became a superstar in his native Britain in his mid-thirties thanks to his definitive portrayal of Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice, a role that made him so iconic there that he spent many years parodying or acknowledging it in films like Love Actually and Bridget Jones's Diary. Sure, he worked in other capacities -- a talent as versatile as his is almost guaranteed steady work in British film -- but it was his turn in Tom Ford's 2009 drama, A Single Man, that brought Firth international acclaim, as well as his first Oscar nomination in the United States. Just one year after that, with Tom Hooper's The King's Speech, Firth solidifies his status as one of the best actors of his generation. Playing the future King George VI, Firth takes the kind of part that stereotypically wins Oscars -- a powerful man with a physical handicap -- and makes him a three-dimensional human. Bertie, as the man is known to close friends and family, has suffered from a stutter his entire life. When his older brother, Edward (Guy Pearce), abdicates the throne just as World War II becomes eminent, Bertie must not only overcome the emotional pressures of ascending to power, but control his stammer as well in order to address and inspire his people on what was, at that point, the most widespread form of mass communication -- radio. To that end, he hires Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush), a commoner who has worked in the nascent field of speech pathology long enough to offer some relief to the self-doubting Bertie, and to force the future monarch to consider the deeper psychological issues that lie at the core of the problem. That description, however, doesn't come close to doing justice to how entertaining The King's Speech is. David Seidler's juicy script is packed with dialogue that alternates between belly laughs, witty retorts, and dramatic revelations with such deftness that each scene -- like the one where Bertie and Lionel first meet -- feels like its own mini-movie, with the character arcs all advancing steadily but surely toward the big day when the king must tell his people that they are at war with the Nazis. Given such an airtight script, director Tom Hooper delivers the goods. His ability to hold a shot -- especially close-ups -- for just the right amount of time is uncanny; he knows where the dramatic or comedic beat is at every point, and he focuses on it with minimum fuss. The King's Speech is old-fashioned in the best sense of the word. Firth is outstanding in the lead role, playing a man with a disability as opposed to simply playing a disability. An actor always capable of indicating the emotions boiling inside a repressed person, he brings out Bertie's neuroses in the subtlest of ways -- hand gestures, eye squints -- as well as in his speech. He makes us feel the near-constant physical frustration of not being able to express yourself. Firth is the biggest reason to see this movie, but he's far from the only one. Rush offers flawless support (and gets the vast majority of the best laugh lines), and Helena Bonham Carter, as Bertie's wife, Elizabeth, reminds everybody that she can handle much more than just Harry Potter movies and her significant other Tim Burton's films. In fact, a scene where she meets Lionel's wife stands as one of the most astoundingly layered exchanges between royalty and a commoner that's ever been filmed. Inspiring, funny, touching, and delivered with craftsmanship and artistry, The King's Speech is a testament to the greatness of King George VI, the talent of Colin Firth, and the joys of quality filmmaking.

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Product Details

Release Date:
04/19/2011
UPC:
0013132313092
Original Release:
2010
Rating:
R
Source:
Starz / Anchor Bay
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
1:59:00
Sales rank:
153

Special Features

Audio commentary with director Tom Hooper; Making of featurette: an inspirational story of an unlikely friendship; Q&A with the director & the cast including Colin Firth ; Speeches from The Real King George VI; The Real Lionel Logue highlights

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Colin Firth King George VI
Geoffrey Rush Lionel Logue
Helena Bonham Carter Queen Elizabeth
Guy Pearce King Edward VIII
Timothy Spall Winston Churchill
Derek Jacobi Archbishop Cosmo Lang
Jennifer Ehle Myrtle Logue
Michael Gambon King George V
Robert Portal Equerry
Richard Dixon Private Secretary
Paul Trussell Chauffeur
Adrian Scarborough BBC Radio Announcer
Andrew Havill Robert Wood
Charles Armstrong BBC Technician
Roger Hammond Dr. Blandine-Bentham
Calum Gittins Laurie Logue
Dominic Applewhite Valentine Logue
Ben Wimsett Anthony Logue
Freya Wilson Princess Elizabeth
Ramona Marquez Princess Margaret
David Bamber Theatre Director
Jake Hathaway Willie
Patrick Ryecart Lord Wigram
Teresa Gallagher Nurse
Simon Chandler Lord Dawson
Claire Bloom Queen Mary
Orlando Wells Duke of Kent
Tim Downie Duke of Goucester
Dick Ward Butler
Eve Best Wallis Simpson
John Albasiny Footman
Danny Emes Boy in Regent's Park
Anthony Andrews Stanley Baldwin
John Warnaby Steward
Roger Parrott Neville Chamberlain

Technical Credits
Tom Hooper Director
Tariq Anwar Editor
Jenny Beavan Costumes/Costume Designer
Erica Bensly Production Manager
Paul Brett Executive Producer
Iain Canning Producer
Danny Cohen Cinematographer
Alexandre Desplat Score Composer
Charles Dorfman Associate Producer
Simon Egan Co-producer
Mark Foligno Executive Producer
Frances Hannon Makeup
Peter Heslop Co-producer,Executive Producer
Scarlett Mackmin Choreography
John Midgley Sound/Sound Designer
Maggie Rodford Musical Direction/Supervision
Geoffrey Rush Executive Producer
David Seidler Screenwriter
Emile Sherman Producer
Tim Smith Executive Producer
Eve Stewart Production Designer
Gareth Unwin Producer
Bob Weinstein Executive Producer
Harvey Weinstein Executive Producer

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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The King's Speech
1. Chapter 1 [5:17]
2. Chapter 2 [2:20]
3. Chapter 3 [4:37]
4. Chapter 4 [5:35]
5. Chapter 5 [11:24]
6. Chapter 6 [5:07]
7. Chapter 7 [4:18]
8. Chapter 8 [7:04]
9. Chapter 9 [10:15]
10. Chapter 10 [4:50]
11. Chapter 11 [4:07]
12. Chapter 12 [6:44]
13. Chapter 13 [2:44]
14. Chapter 14 [2:12]
15. Chapter 15 [4:38]
16. Chapter 16 [2:10]
17. Chapter 17 [7:28]
18. Chapter 18 [2:42]
19. Chapter 19 [8:01]
20. Chapter 20 [6:27]
21. Chapter 21 [3:17]
22. Chapter 22 [6:53]

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