×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Lodger
     

The Lodger

4.2 4
Director: Alfred Hitchcock, Ivor Novello, Marie Ault, Arthur Chesney

Cast: Alfred Hitchcock, Ivor Novello, Marie Ault, Arthur Chesney

 

See All Formats & Editions

While the silent The Lodger was not director Alfred Hitchcock's first film, it was the first to truly deserve the designation "A Hitchcock Picture." British matinee idol Ivor Novello plays Jonathan Drew, a quiet, secretive young man who rents a room in a London boarding house. Drew's arrival coincides with the reign of Terror orchestrated by Jack the Ripper. As

Overview

While the silent The Lodger was not director Alfred Hitchcock's first film, it was the first to truly deserve the designation "A Hitchcock Picture." British matinee idol Ivor Novello plays Jonathan Drew, a quiet, secretive young man who rents a room in a London boarding house. Drew's arrival coincides with the reign of Terror orchestrated by Jack the Ripper. As the film progresses, circumstantial evidence begins to mount, pointing to Drew as the selfsame Ripper. In addition to Novello's 1932 remake, The Lodger was remade in 1944 with Laird Cregar, then again in 1953 as Man in the Attic, with Jack Palance as Jonathan Drew.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Described by Alfred Hitchcock himself as the "first true Hitchcock film," The Lodger is a suspenseful Jack-the-Ripper tale that features one of the master's most familiar themes: an innocent man who is blamed for a crime. In the case of this 1926 silent about a killer who targets blondes, that man is a mysterious lodger in a London apartment house played by British screen star Ivor Novello. The actor does a terrific job of casting suspicion on himself by alternating between being sinister and sincere. The plot is similar to that of 1941's Suspicion, but unlike the weak ending of that Hitchcock classic, The Lodger's conclusion is stunning: Novello being chased across town by an angry lynch mob that believes he is the killer. In only his third film, Hitchcock's creative style and willingness to innovate are already apparent. The story is carried entirely by its images, with only a minimal number of title cards used for dialogue. The director shot the opening scene as a combination of images that set up the entire plot and convey the terror of the situation, all with only a few words. In another chilling scene that shows the fright of the building's owners as they see a chandelier shaking, Hitchcock used a see-through Plexiglas ceiling to show that the movement is caused by the lodger, who nervously paces above them. The Lodger marked the first of Hitchcock's famed onscreen appearances, due to the fact that he was needed as an extra. He is seen in two spots, first as a man in a mailroom during the opening sequence, then again at the end as an onlooker to the mob scene.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/18/2012
UPC:
0661799467704
Original Release:
1926
Source:
Desert Island Films
Time:
1:14:00
Sales rank:
15,201

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Videos

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Lodger 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Lodger is one of my favorite silent films. However, previous PD editions usually have an atrocious picture due to horrible prints. This edition presents an excellent picture. Great care has been taken to make the image as pristine as can be. The extras are also above average. This is the definitive edition of this film.
KainanJ8 More than 1 year ago
Not only is this a great film from the silent era, but it is also considered to be the first true "Hitchcock" film, in the sense of style and content. I couldn't agree more. This has nearly all the elements people would come to find from his films afterward, but especially the most important two: murder and suspense (with particular emphasis on suspense). Hitchcock knew how to build it, and it is especially impressive to see in a silent film, where there are basically JUST the visual elements to rely on. A great example is a scene where the Lodger is leaving the house at night. Although we are not 100% sure of his intentions, we feel pretty strongly that he shouldn't leave the house. We watch as he sneaks his way downstairs, arousing the attention of a fellow tenant. In further Hitchcockian fashion, we then find ourselves implicated in this situation, as we begin to hope that the Lodger will make it out without being caught! So as far as story and filmmaking quality go, this has enough going for it. It's not high art, but most of Hitchcocks works weren't. It's simply what Hitchcock does best: a very well made thriller. Regarding the DVD, there are really no complaints here. The picture quality looks great (especially for a film that old). The new soundtrack is quite fitting. It nicely blends elements with more modern movie scores with the feel of silent era orchestration. The commentary track is fun, and there are several other tidbits for Hitchcock fans like myself, including audio clips from interviews with Hitchcock himself. So, all in all, if you're a Hitchcock fan, or a silent movie fan, I would definitely recommend this movie. However, if you find yourself unable to watch silent films (which is unfortunate, because you're missing a lot of great movies), this one probably won't bring you around.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good show to watch.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago