Longest Yard

The Longest Yard

5.0 1
Director: Robert Aldrich

Cast: Burt Reynolds, Eddie Albert, Pervis Atkins

     
 

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Like Steven Spielberg's excellent, oddly forgotten Sugarland Express, The Longest Yard manages to be crowd-pleasing entertainment and a tough, uncompromising movie at the same time. While The Longest Yard has a devoted following and shows up on TV often, this Paramount DVD is still a welcome release. The print has been cleaned up considerably

Overview

Like Steven Spielberg's excellent, oddly forgotten Sugarland Express, The Longest Yard manages to be crowd-pleasing entertainment and a tough, uncompromising movie at the same time. While The Longest Yard has a devoted following and shows up on TV often, this Paramount DVD is still a welcome release. The print has been cleaned up considerably (previous video versions were incredibly faded) and the anamorphic widescreen transfer shows off the visual flair of director Robert Aldrich and his longtime cinematographer, Joseph Biroc, instead of hampering it the way that previous versions had. The Dolby Digital 2.0 audio track comes in the original mono and the sound mix is right on the mark. While fans of The Longest Yard will have to wait for a DVD edition that comes with extras, this Paramount release has the movie looking and sounding better than at any time since 1974, when it first hit the screen.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Charles Salzberg
When it comes to football, good-old-boy comedy, a grand confrontation with self-esteem, and some great don't-blink character turns, The Longest Yard scores on every down. Burt Reynolds, having established his big-screen credibility as a bow-and-arrow-toting macho man two years earlier in Deliverance, went back to his roots as a football player (he'd played at Florida State) in this comedy-cum-morality play from director Robert Aldrich (Whatever Happened to Baby Jane, The Dirty Dozen). Reynolds plays a former professional quarterback who's now riding the bench in a state penitentiary, where the evil, conniving warden (Eddie Albert) pressures him into organizing a team of inmates to play against the prison's beefy guards. The guards moonlight as the warden's organized semipro team, so Reynolds's ragtag bunch shouldn't have a chance, but... Reynolds confronts the title's moral equivalent when the warden offers him an early release in exchange for throwing the big game. Film buffs can look for the ever-present Reynolds crony James Hampton as Caretaker; Bond's future "Jaws," Richard Kiel as Samson, and a charming beehive-haired turn by Bernadette Peters as the warden's secretary. While there are other powerful pigskin tales -- Brian's Song, Rudy -- the uneven playing field confronting Reynolds makes The Longest Yard a particularly satisfying tale.
All Movie Guide
In keeping with Hollywood's shifting values in the early '70s, the protagonists of this prison comedy are inmates, and not the guards and wardens who oversee them. As in The Last Detail or One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the film's representatives of mainstream society are evil or banal, while its rebellious heroes are irreverent and vital. And, as in those films, a charismatic leader helps the audience to identify with the counter-culture heroes -- a role ably filled here by Burt Reynolds. An accomplished football player in college, Reynolds scored his first post-Deliverance hit with The Longest Yard, cementing his status as a Hollywood sex symbol. Filmed on location at a prison in Georgia, the picture has the naturalistic look and "experimental" editing common to films of the time. Michael Luciano was nominated for an Oscar primarily for his energetic editing of the climactic football game, which takes up a full half-hour.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/30/2001
UPC:
0097360870848
Original Release:
1974
Rating:
R
Source:
Paramount
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[monaural]
Time:
2:01:00

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Burt Reynolds Paul Crewe
Eddie Albert Warden Hazen
Pervis Atkins Mawabe
Malcolm Atterbury Actor
Michael D. Ford Announcer
Tony Reese Levitt
George Jones Big George
Ed Lauter Capt. Knauer
James Hampton Caretaker
Mike Henry Rassmeusen
Joe Kapp Walking Boss
Joseph Dorsey Bartender
Jack Rockwell Trainer
Sonny Shroyer Tannen
J. Don Ferguson Referee
Chuck Hayward Trooper I
Alfie Wise Trooper
Joe Jackson Little Joe
Robert Tessier Shokner
Michael Conrad Nate Scarboro
Harry Caesar Granville
John Steadman Pop
Charles Tyner Unger
Bernadette Peters Warden's Secretary
Pepper Martin Shop Steward
Ernie Wheelwright Spooner
Richard Kiel Samson
Dino Washington Mason
Ray Nitschke Guard Bogdanski
Mort Marshall Assistant Warden
Anitra Ford Melissa
Sonny Sixkiller The Indian
Ray Ogden Schmidt
Tony Cacciotti Rotka

Technical Credits
Robert Aldrich Director
Joseph Biroc Cinematographer
Clifford C. Coleman Asst. Director
Frank deVol Score Composer
George Hively Editor
Allan Jacobs Editor
Charles James Costumes/Costume Designer
Michael Luciano Editor
Albert S. Ruddy Original Story,Producer
James D. Vance Production Designer
John K. Wilkinson Sound/Sound Designer
Tracy Keenan Wynn Screenwriter

Scene Index

Scene Selection
0. Scene Selection
1. All-American SOB [7:17]
2. Behind Bars [1:36]
3. A New Game Plan [3:29]
4. Swamp Reclamation [5:59]
5. Fighting Dirty [:10]
6. Pros & Cons [8:35]
7. Assembling The Team [:55]
8. The Specialists [3:53]
9. Three Gigantic Rip-Offs [6:28]
10. Caretaker [2:01]
11. Mean Machine [1:19]
12. "I Think I Broke His F***ing Neck!" [:10]
13. Crewe Cuts Deal With Warden [8:36]
14. Hardball [5:53]
15. Game Ball [4:46]
16. Roster [5:17]

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The Longest Yard 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Before getting mucked up in a series of 1980's celluloid trash, Burt Reynolds proved he was a solid dramatic actor with a series of great parts, this one right before re-teaming with Robert Aldrich and co-star Eddie Albert, in HUSTLE. Be you a football fan or not, this is a winner of a film. A great (familiar) cast and witty dialogue that scores on every series.