×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Marquise of O
     

The Marquise of O

3.0 2
Director: Eric Rohmer

Cast: Edith Clever, Bruno Ganz, Edda Seippel

 

See All Formats & Editions

The costume drama Die Marquise von O is French director Eric Rohmer's first feature-length theatrical release after a four-year break from filmmaking. Based on a novella by Henrich von Kleist, the dialogue is spoken in the original German language and the story is set in Italy during the 18th century. Edith Clever plays the widowed Marquise, who is sexually

Overview

The costume drama Die Marquise von O is French director Eric Rohmer's first feature-length theatrical release after a four-year break from filmmaking. Based on a novella by Henrich von Kleist, the dialogue is spoken in the original German language and the story is set in Italy during the 18th century. Edith Clever plays the widowed Marquise, who is sexually assaulted by Russian soldiers and rescued by a Count (Bruno Ganz). Some time later, she has to explain to her parents (Peter Lühr and Edda Seippel) and brother (Otto Sander) why she's pregnant. Die Marquise von O won the Grand Jury Prize in the 1976 Cannes Film Festival. At least one of the home video releases and several capsule reviews erroneously state the film (and its parent novella) as unfolding during the Franco-Prussian wars, but both are actually set during the Napoleonic Wars, hence the presence of Russian troops.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Michael Costello
Eric Rohmer's adaptation of the Kleist novella is a quietly charming, exquisitely wrought film. Set during the 18th century, the film focuses on an unmarried young Marquise (Edith Clever) who becomes mysteriously pregnant months after having narrowly avoided rape. Rohmer's fascination with Christian themes continues with this gently ironic twist on Church doctrine. The soul of the film is a beautifully modulated performance by the legendary German actress, who charts a gradual course from delicate embarrassment to desperate humiliation with stunning control. Rohmer practices his customary restraint, like Mizoguchi, registering the most passionate moments from a distance. Slyly commenting on the bourgeois obsession with respectability by setting it against the suggestively miraculous event, he makes the discomfort of the young woman's parents at once comic and touching. Bruno Ganz, as the unusually tactful Count, puts a brilliant finish on this wise and witty fable.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/06/2015
UPC:
0857692005376
Original Release:
1976
Source:
Film Movement
Region Code:
0
Time:
1:43:00
Sales rank:
2,369

Special Features

Closed Caption; New essay by film critic David Thomson; Archival interview with star Bruno Ganz; Archival interview with director Eric Rohmer

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Marquise of O
1. Rescued [9:58]
2. Back To Normal [8:05]
3. From The Grave [13:08]
4. Not An Inclination [9:59]
5. Without Blemish [9:56]
6. As A General Rule [3:54]
7. Bear A Stigma [6:46]
8. Renew The Proposal [10:22]
9. As Answer [10:47]
10. Who Else But Him? [12:05]
11. Thinka! [6:44]
12. Credits [:43]

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Marquise of O 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Closely follows Kleist's novel. A wonderful example of Rohmer's dialogic style, set at the start of the XIXth Century and anticipating the tableaux of "The Lady and the Duke".
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a ridiculous movie. If you're REALLY into this sort of thing, ok, go for it. But I wouldn't recommend it. The plot line is really unbelievable at times (as in, you can't believe they actually expect you to buy it). Acting is pretty mediocre. I wouldn't waste my money on it. If you're looking for German films, there are some much more enjoyable ones out there. If you're looking for this type of film (time period or whatnot)... I can't think of any offhand, but there have to be better ones than this. My advice is to keep looking.