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The Missing Person

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Overview

A sardonic, gin-soaked detective contends with an odd cast of characters while tailing a mysterious, middle-aged man traveling with a Mexican boy from Chicago to Los Angeles in writer/director Noah Buschel's twisting neo-noir mystery. John Rosow is a Chicago gumshoe whose skill for cracking a case often comes with a price; he has a penchant for getting in over his head, but he never loses his cool. Contacted by influential lawyer Drexler Hewitt and asked to shadow a man who is currently en route to Los Angeles ...
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DVD (Wide Screen)
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Overview

A sardonic, gin-soaked detective contends with an odd cast of characters while tailing a mysterious, middle-aged man traveling with a Mexican boy from Chicago to Los Angeles in writer/director Noah Buschel's twisting neo-noir mystery. John Rosow is a Chicago gumshoe whose skill for cracking a case often comes with a price; he has a penchant for getting in over his head, but he never loses his cool. Contacted by influential lawyer Drexler Hewitt and asked to shadow a man who is currently en route to Los Angeles with a young boy, Rosow collects his cash and instructions from Hewitt's gruff assistant, Miss Charley, and sets out on his latest assignment. Upon arriving in Santa Monica, however, Rosow is caught off guard when he learns that his objective has been updated. He is now to bring the man back to New York. For his efforts, Rosow will receive the tidy sum of half a million dollars. Later, as Rosow attempts to track down his target, a Segway-riding LAPD officer and a cab driver with extensive knowledge of the Catholic saints offer some helpful clues to the man's whereabouts as meddling FBI agents close in and a sensual femme fatale follows his every move.
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Special Features

Closed Caption; Original theatrical trailer; Other Strand Releasing trailers
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/13/2010
  • UPC: 712267291328
  • Original Release: 2008
  • Rating:

  • Source: Strand Home Video
  • Presentation: Wide Screen
  • Time: 1:35:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 75,873

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Michael Shannon John Rosow
Frank Wood Harold Fullmer
Amy Ryan Miss Charley
Linda Emond Mrs. Fullmer
John Ventimiglia Hero
Margaret Colin Lana
Paul Sparks Gus Papitos
Yul Vázquez Don Edgar
Paul Adelstein Drexler Hewitt
Kate Arrington Jane Rosow
Anthony Esposito Javier
Daniel Franzese Agent Craig
Liza Weil Agent Chambers
Merritt Wever Mabel
Gary Wilmes L.A. Cop
Rodrigo Lopresti L.A. Taxi Driver
Joe Lovano Saxophone Player
Technical Credits
Noah Buschel Director, Screenwriter
Allen Bain Producer
Jim Black Score Composer, Musical Direction/Supervision
Lois Drabkin Producer
Alex Estes Producer
Mollie Goldstein Editor
Petra Hoebel Co-producer
Eden Miller Costumes/Costume Designer
Jason Orans Executive Producer
Amy Ryan Executive Producer
Ryan Samul Cinematographer
Jesse Scolaro Producer
Aleta Shaffer Production Designer
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Missing Person
1. An Early Call [8:27]
2. In Plain Sight [6:58]
3. In Pursuit [11:47]
4. Lana [6:47]
5. Serpico [8:21]
6. Double-Crossed [10:26]
7. Meeting Harold [9:29]
8. Arrival [5:50]
9. Gone Again [11:24]
10. The Painting [8:20]
11. Peace [3:07]
12. End Credits [4:18]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- The Missing Person
   Play Feature
   Chapters
   Original Theatrical Trailer
   Other Strand Titles
      Peter And Vandy
      Downloading Nancy
      The Headless Woman
      A Woman in Berlin
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Mood Piece That Uses Old Techniques to Tell a Modern Story

    Writer/Director Noah Buschel is a name we will likely recognize more as audiences who missed the theater release of this very quiet moody piece discover it on DVD. In many way this story and cinematic recreation of the story reminds us of the old dark Bogart mysteries - in tone of telling, in filming gestures, and in the casting. It is a true 'film noir' revealed slowly and insidiously in tones of umber, gray, and washed out colors so prevalent in the early color films and so additive to this production. For this viewer it works on every level. Private Detective John Rosow (Michael Shannon in a brilliantly understated performance) is a down and out, alcoholic, internalized and bruised man who is hired to shadow a man from Chicago to Los Angeles. Rosow seems to be easily manipulated by his 'boss' Gus (Papitos) and sidekick Charley (Amy Ryan), but when Rosow reaches Los Angeles he discovers that the man he is trailing - Harold Fulmer (Frank Wood) - is delivering a young Mexican boy to one Don Edgar (Yul Vasquez) who seems to be running an orphanage for lost kids to either sell to adopting parents or manipulate otherwise. He is sidetracked by an agent Lana Cobb (Margaret Colin) but with the help of a taxi driver Hero (John Ventimiglia) he finally finds his targeted Harold who insists that he is a lost man, a man who only wants to remain missing to help people like the young Mexican who was an unwanted boy to find some degree of happiness. Rosow reports his findings, and surprisingly is told that Harold wife Megan (Linda Emond) will pay a huge sum of money just to retrieve her missing husband. It seems Harold has been missing since 9/11, but instead of dying in that explosion Harold escaped and decided the world needed help- the only way he felt he could deliver it was to leave behind his wealthy wife and lifestyle and simply do good, anonymous deeds. Rosow meets with Megan, gets the money, but in doing so Rosow must relive the fact that he has lost his wife and world as a result of 9/11, changing his priorities of how to end his assignment: does he turn over Harold and take the small fortune or does he follow his heart? He does the right thing. Though the story is a strongly told mystery thriller it is first and foremost a story about the loss and disorientation that have paralyzed so many people following 9/11. The beauty of THE MISSING PERSON is the message that in many ways we are all 'missing persons' now. How we elect to deal with that is the part of the story we individually must complete. Michael Shannon enters the ranks of significant film actors with this deeply touching role. This is a little film that deserves a very wide audience. Grady Harp

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews