The Name of the Rose by Jean-Jacques Annaud |Jean-Jacques Annaud, Sean Connery, F. Murray Abraham, Christian Slater | 883929180080 | Blu-ray | Barnes & Noble
Name of the Rose
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The Name of the Rose

4.5 14
Director: Jean-Jacques Annaud

Cast: Jean-Jacques Annaud, Sean Connery, F. Murray Abraham, Christian Slater

     
 

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Adapted from Umberto Eco's best-selling novel, director Jean-Jacques Annaud's The Name of the Rose is a 14th century murder-mystery thriller starring Sean Connery as a Sherlock Holmes-esque Franciscan monk called William of Baskerville. When a murder occurs at a secluded Benedictine Abbey, William is called in to investigate. As he and his apprentice, Adson von

Overview

Adapted from Umberto Eco's best-selling novel, director Jean-Jacques Annaud's The Name of the Rose is a 14th century murder-mystery thriller starring Sean Connery as a Sherlock Holmes-esque Franciscan monk called William of Baskerville. When a murder occurs at a secluded Benedictine Abbey, William is called in to investigate. As he and his apprentice, Adson von Melk (Christian Slater), delve deeper and deeper into the case, more dead bodies begin to turn up. Eventually, Bernardo Gui, an inquisitor played by F. Murray Abraham gets involved, but he may not have the best intentions. Sean Connery's performance earned him the award for Best Actor at the 1988 British Academy Awards.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
French director Jean-Jacques Annaud and four screenwriters labored mightily on this 1986 adaptation of Umberto Eco’s international bestseller, a murder mystery that unfolds in an Italian abbey during the dark days of the Inquisition. Their efforts weren’t totally successful; at the time, many critics and moviegoers found the film confusing and occasionally ponderous. But the intervening two decades have been kind to The Name of the Rose, and today it can be appreciated as a genre-bending landmark. Sean Connery delivers one of his most charismatic performances as the English Franciscan monk who arrives with his novice (a nearly unrecognizable Christian Slater) on the eve of a conclave at the abbey. A series of murders occupies Connery while other attendees continue to arrive, but the intellectual rigor he brings to his investigation doesn’t sit well with Inquisitor F. Murray Abraham, who sees Satan as the instigator of the vile crimes. The clashes between Connery and Abraham are wonderful; as is the relationship between the erstwhile Bond and his boyish charge, Slater. The monk is like a medieval Sherlock Holmes, mixing elaborate ratiocination with periodic chiding of his "Watson," and always to delightful effect. The film’s pace, like its setting, is stately; nonetheless, this Rose is a complex whodunit that will engage mystery-loving viewers from the first reel and keep them glued to their chairs for the next two hours.
All Movie Guide - Dan Friedman
Many forget that in-between his years as James Bond and his reclamation by Hollywood in The Untouchables, Sean Connery made several fine films which are just as entertaining today as they were upon release. The mainstay of these films is The Name of the Rose, based on Umberto Eco's novel of violent murders in a 14th century Italian abbey. As the English monk William of Baskerville, Connery struggles to solve the murders against a backdrop of medieval religious fervor, playing it as if Sherlock Holmes had found religion. Obviously, religion is a big theme in this film, thrown up as it is against the notions of truth and justice and the philosophical differences these concepts sometimes find with each other. Connery is utterly believable and his characterization appears effortless. Fine support is provided by F. Murray Abraham, and Christian Slater in one of his first roles. The film can be exhausting at times, just as it can also be extremely dark, but it's definitely a thought-provoker and worth it for both the acting and the period setting.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/02/2011
UPC:
0883929180080
Original Release:
1986
Rating:
R
Source:
Warner Home Video
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[DTS 5.1-Channel Surround Sound, Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
2:11:00
Sales rank:
6,970

Special Features

Vintage making-of documentary The Abbey of Crime: Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose; Commentary by director Jean-Jacques Annaud in both English and French with subtitles; Photo video journey with Jean-Jacques Annaud; Theatrical trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Sean Connery William of Baskerville
F. Murray Abraham Bernardo Gui
Christian Slater Adso of Melk
Elya Baskin Severinus
Michel Lonsdale The Abbot
Feodor Chaliapin Jorge de Burgos
William Hickey Ubertino de Casale
Ron Perlman Salvatore
Valentina Vargas The Girl
Volker Prechtel Malachia
Helmut Qualtinger Remigio de Varagine
Urs Althaus Venantius
Valerio Isidori Actor
Kim Rossi Stuart Novice
Franco Valobra Jerome of Kaffa
Dwight Weist Adso as an Old Man
Michael Habeck Berengar
Leopoldo Trieste Michele de Censena
Vernon Dobtcheff Hugh of Newcastle
Donal O'Brien Pietro d'Assisi
Andrew Birkin Cuthbert of Winchester
Lucien Bodard Cardinal Bertrand
Peter Berling Jean d'Anneaux
Pete Lancaster Bishop of Alborea
Franco Adducci Monk
Mario Diano Monk
Armando Marra Monk
Maurizio Merli Monk
Francesco Scali Monk
Ennio Lollainni Swineherd
Emil Feist Swineherd
Francesco Maselli Swineherd
Renato Nebolini Swineherd
Mark Bellinghaus Jorge's Novice
David Furtwaengler Novice
Patrick Kreuzer Novice
Lars Bodin-Jorgensen Adelmo
Franco Diogene Papal Envoy
Gina Poli Papal Envoy
Gianni Rizzo Papal Envoy
Vittorio Zarfati Papal Envoy
Carlo Bianchino Papal Guard
Eugenio Bonardi Inquisition Guard
Pietro Ceccarelli Inquisition Guard
Franco Marino Inquisition Guard
Hans Schoedel Inquisition Guard
Peter Welz Nero
Alberto Capone Executioner
Ludger Pistor Actor

Technical Credits
Jean-Jacques Annaud Director
Gianni Arduini Casting
Dominique Besnehard Casting
Andrew Birkin Screenwriter
Gérard Brach Screenwriter
Tonino Delli Colli Cinematographer
Franco Cristaldi Co-producer
Jake Eberts Executive Producer
Bernd Eichinger Producer
Dante Ferretti Production Designer
Celestia Fox Casting
Howard Franklin Screenwriter
Giorgio Giovannini Art Director
Alain Godard Screenwriter
James Horner Score Composer
Hasso Von Hugo Makeup
Sergio Mioni Stunts
Alexandre Mnouchkine Co-producer
Gabriella Pescucci Costumes/Costume Designer
Adriano Pischiutta Special Effects
David Rubin Casting
Rainer Schaper Art Director
Francesca Lo Schiavo Set Decoration/Design
Sabine Schroth Casting
Thomas Schühly Executive Producer
Jane Seitz Editor
Lynn Stalmaster Casting

Videos

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The Name of the Rose 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An absolute wonderful movie that took too long to be released on DVD... and when it is released, it's on full screen format! Why oh why??? This film deserved wide-screen and director's cut and whatever more ammenities.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Oh, relax. What an underrated movie. People complain about too much production in a movie and when the plot challenges individuals a certai
RobbieBobby44 More than 1 year ago
Sean Connery even says "it's elementary" when explaining a clue to his novice. GREAT reference! As a pamplisest of Eco's phenomenal novel, taking place in the 1300s in a monastery in the desolate reaches of northern Italy, Brother William and his teenaged assistant Adzo work to uncover the reasons behind a number of murders. Of course several of the men say "the Devil is doing it, the end of the world is near" but the truth is not all that spectacular. Featuring a very ill-tempered headmaster, a subservient (that is, spineless) second-in-command, a hunchback who was once a heretic, a bewitching peasant girl (who's not a witch), an extremely creepy overweight monk who's ghostly white and a library maze, all the pieces are in place for a riveting whodunit. Then the Holy Inquisition gets involved and the stuff really hits the fan. Thankfully the film does not include the barrage of philosophical conversations that went far over my head (Eco's a genius, I am not) but it conveys the source material well enough. I also loved the message about the value of books and learning from different opinions - even ones considered blasphemous/forbidden at one time or another.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"The Name of the Rose" is the most historically correct film ever made in Hollywood according to my college history professor. She absolutely wanted all her students to see this film. It's based on the book, so yes there would be a nude scene wouldn't there?
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this DVD without renting it first and I regret my decision. The reviews failed to mention that there is an explicit nudity scene, which totally took me by surprise and did not fit in this movie whatsoever. Definitely a movie I would not let the family see. The whole thing is slow moving, and I found myself fastforwarding through some of it. The storyline was interesting, so I did watch it to the end, but I most likely will not watch it again.