Nines
  • Alternative view 1 of The Nines
  • Alternative view 2 of The Nines

The Nines

5.0 3
Director: John August

Cast: John August, Ryan Reynolds, Hope Davis, Melissa McCarthy

     
 
Writer/director John August ponders the metaphysical aspects of life and art in an episodic allegory that follows three artists as they embark on a soul searching journey of fate versus free will. When a troubled actor is placed under house arrest in "The Prisoner," his imagination begins to run wild due to the fact that his spirited publicist and cynical neighbor

Overview

Writer/director John August ponders the metaphysical aspects of life and art in an episodic allegory that follows three artists as they embark on a soul searching journey of fate versus free will. When a troubled actor is placed under house arrest in "The Prisoner," his imagination begins to run wild due to the fact that his spirited publicist and cynical neighbor provide his only link to the outside world. Later, after the planes of reality fold in on themselves during the production of a Project Greenlight-style show which documents the filming of a popular sitcom in "Reality Television," "Knowing" follows a successful video game designer and his family as they become stranded in the middle of nowhere due to automotive issues. Ryan Reynolds, Hope Davis, and Melissa McCarthy star in a drama that peels back the layers of reality to ask whether or not mankind really has any control over his ultimate fate.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/29/2008
UPC:
0043396227507
Original Release:
2007
Rating:
R
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
1
Time:
1:39:00

Special Features

Commentary with director John August and Ryan Reynolds; Commentary with director John August, editor Douglas Crise and Melissa McCarthy; Deleted scenes (with optional commentary); "Summing Up the Nines" making-of featurette; Script to storyboard to screen comparisons; Photo gallery slideshow; "God" a short film by John August (with optional commentary); Alternate ending and more

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ryan Reynolds Gary/Gavin/Gabriel
Hope Davis Sarah/Susan/Sierra
Melissa McCarthy Margaret/Melissa/Mary
Elle Fanning Noelle
Dahlia Salem Herself
David Denman Parole Officer/Agitated Man
Octavia L. Spencer Streetwalker/Woman on Sidewalk
Ben Falcone Himself

Technical Credits
John August Director,Screenwriter
Richard Adrian Sound/Sound Designer
Bruce Cohen Producer
Douglas Crise Editor
Dan Etheridge Producer
Molly Elizabeth Grundman Costumes/Costume Designer
Dan Jinks Producer
Julianne Jordan Musical Direction/Supervision
Todd King Co-producer
Mark Mathis Asst. Director
E. Colleen Saro Art Director
Nancy Schreiber Cinematographer
Alex Wurman Score Composer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Nines
1. Start [4:39]
2. "What if I'm God?" [2:23]
3. The Prisoner [3:24]
4. Haunted [:31]
5. Sarah [3:39]
6. All There Is [1:53]
7. The Nines [5:44]
8. Signs [2:20]
9. The Edge of Your World [1:40]
10. Look For the Nines [2:05]
11. "I Know Who You Are" [3:31]
12. "Tell Me About the Nines" [1:16]
13. Reality Television [5:10]
14. Behind the Screen [1:59]
15. Testing [3:55]
16. The Melissa Problem [3:00]
17. Reset [5:02]
18. Dark Decision [2:28]
19. Upfronts [6:10]
20. In Flux [2:27]
21. A Nine [3:37]
22. Knowing [1:05]
23. Trust [3:12]
24. God Mode [:58]
25. Intervention [2:47]
26. "Let's Go Home" [2:23]
27. Departure [4:46]
28. Best of All Possible Worlds [4:50]

Videos

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Nines 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
THE NINES is a film that may seem like a tough story to follow, but the concept and the 'autobiographical' script by the gifted John August are so fine that once seen, this film demands re-visiting. It is tremendously entertaining, blessed with a superb cast, and offers food for thought far beyond the running time of the film. For this viewer it falls into the 'brilliant' category. More of an existential exercise than a traditional movie tale, THE NINES has the courage to challenge our concept of that is the real world, what is fantasy, what exists beyond our concept of our 'space' here on planet Earth, and just how significant is the current obsession with television reality shows and videogames on the way we are stuck in the present. John August explores these issues by interweaving three stories, using the same actors to change vantages and personalities to raise questions and pose problems for the audience to attempt to resolve. It works. Part I ('The Prisoner') views the life of a famous television personality Gary (Ryan Reynolds) who naïvely takes on a 'crack' trip that results in a house arrest controlled by a jovial officer Margaret (Melissa McCarthy) and whose only outlet is a neighbor Sarah (Hope Davis) with whom he has a seductive affinity: while both women appear real, events occur that make their existence questionable to the crack-addled Gary. In Part II, 'Reality Television', Gavin (Reynolds) is a television writer attempting to get his pilot film accepted by executive boss Susan (Davis), but falls into troubled times when he is told his best friend Melissa (McCarthy) must be dropped from the project. In Part III, 'Knowing', Gabriel (Reynolds) is a gentle videogame creator, happily married to Mary (McCarthy) with a daughter Noelle (Elle Fanning) who has been weaving in and out of the film as different characters, gets stuck in a forest and in attempting to seek help encounters Sierra (Davis), a strange woman who finally approaches the possibilities of Gabriel's 'mission on earth'. The title of the movie becomes apparent when Sierra informs Gabriel that while God is a 10, human beings are only 7s, koala bears are 8s because they control the environment, and Gabriel is a 9 - an extraterrestrial being in a human incarnation to test the goodness of the earth. How this information affects Gabriel and how the story is resolved is yet more of the intellectual exercise and joy of THE NINES. Ryan Reynolds is extraordinarily fine in his three roles: he is a far better actor than the usual films he makes would indicate. Hope Davis and Melissa McCarthy are as always reliably excellent. But the magic of this film comes form the mind and direction of John August who thankfully gives the audience much to ponder. It is a gem of a film. Highly Recommended. Grady Harp
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago