Outlaw Josey Wales

Outlaw Josey Wales

4.9 11

Cast: Chief Dan George, Sondra Locke, Bill McKinney


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Clint Eastwood's fifth film as a director and eighth Western as a star (ninth if you count Paint Your Wagon), The Outlaw Josey Wales chronicles the hero's violent journey westward after the Civil War. With fresh memoris of his family's slaughter by Red Leg soldier Terrill (Bill McKinney), Confederate Josey Wales (Eastwood) refuses to join his captain…  See more details below


Clint Eastwood's fifth film as a director and eighth Western as a star (ninth if you count Paint Your Wagon), The Outlaw Josey Wales chronicles the hero's violent journey westward after the Civil War. With fresh memoris of his family's slaughter by Red Leg soldier Terrill (Bill McKinney), Confederate Josey Wales (Eastwood) refuses to join his captain Fletcher (John Vernon) and the rest of his comrades in surrender to a U.S. Army regiment. Deemed a dangerous outlaw after a bloody one-man battle with that regiment, Josey is pursued by U.S. cavalry soldiers led by the unwilling Fletcher and the murderous Terrill, as well as by bounty hunters who eventually learn how coolly lethal Wales can be. Despite his desire to remain a lone fugitive, Josey soon has a crew of travelling companions that includes Cherokee Lone Watie (Chief Dan George) and the pretty Laura Lee (Sondra Locke) and her vigorous Grandma Sarah (Paula Trueman), settlers on their way to a ranch near ghost town Santa Rio. The few Santa Rio residents welcome the group, but their peace and Josey's burgeoning romance with Laura Lee are soon interrupted by Terrill's arrival. A skillfully violent man of few, well-chosen words, Josey Wales resembles Eastwood's previous Western heroes in Sergio Leone's trilogy, A Fistful of Dollars (1964), For a Few Dollars More (1965), and The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966). However, the emphasis on friends and family served notice that, in the words of one critic, "the Man With No Name doesn't live here anymore." Indeed, Josey Wales would be Eastwood's last western before 1985's Pale Rider. Although it did not garner similar critical praise when it was released, Eastwood considers The Outlaw Josey Wales to be the equal of the Oscar-winning Unforgiven (1992).

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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Clint Eastwood began directing his own pictures just as such new Hollywood filmmakers as Sam Peckinpah and Arthur Penn were replacing the honorable stoicism of old John Wayne films with a more brutal amorality. Eastwood-directed Westerns tend to mix qualities from both traditional and modern forms of the genre: the title character in The Outlaw Josey Wales, for example, is somewhere between hero and anti-hero. He's similar to the "Man with No Name" character from the Fistful of Dollars trilogy, but he's an altogether nicer cowpoke. Josey Wales is an altogether nicer movie as well. Though our hero isn't guaranteed a happy ending, there is a reassuring sense of right and wrong. It's a much different feel from the era's prevailing Westerns. Eastwood didn't direct another Western until 1985's Pale Rider.

Product Details

Release Date:
Original Release:
Warner Home Video
[Wide Screen]
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Special Features

All-new in this release: ; Commentary by Richard Schickel; New featurette: Clint Eastwood's west ; Plus: ; 2 vintage featurettes: Hell Hath No Fury - the making of The Outlaw Josey Wales and Eastwood in action; Theatrical trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Clint Eastwood Josey Wales
Chief Dan George Lone Watie
Sondra Locke Laura Lee
Bill McKinney Terrill
John Vernon Fletcher
Paula Trueman Grandma Sarah
Samuel Bottoms Jamie
Geraldine Keams Little Moonlight
Woodrow Parfrey Carpetbagger
Joyce Jameson Rose
Sheb Wooley Cobb
Royal Dano Ten Spot
John Verros Chato
Will Sampson Ten Bears
John Quade Comanchero Leader
Matt Clark Kelly
Cissy Wellman Josey's Wife
Buck Kartalian Shopkeeper
Len Lesser Abe
Doug McGrath Lige
John Russell Bloody Bill Anderson
Charles Tyner Zukie Limmer
Bruce M. Fischer Yoke
John Mitchum Al
Clay Tanner First Texas Ranger
Bob Hoy Second Texas Ranger
Erik Holland Union Army Sergeant
Danny Green Lemuel
L. William O'Connell Sim Carstairs
John Chandler First Bounty Hunter

Technical Credits
Clint Eastwood Director
Sonia Chernus Screenwriter
Robert Daley Producer
Jim Fargo Asst. Director
Jerry Fielding Score Composer
Bert Hallberg Sound/Sound Designer
Philip Kaufman Screenwriter
Tambi Larsen Production Designer
Fritz Manes Producer
Charles R. Pierce Set Decoration/Design
Tex Rudloff Sound/Sound Designer
Walter Scott Stunts
Bruce Surtees Cinematographer
Ferris Webster Editor
John G. Wilson Associate Producer

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The Outlaw Josey Wales 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
JasperNicky More than 1 year ago
I love this movie for the character portrayals and the rich story elements. I read where John Wayne didn't like Clint Eastwood's anti-hero premises. John Wayne wanted the hero to be "The Hero" and never do anything that could be construed to be wrong. But right and wrong can blur in war and survival situations. I like the reality that Clint's characters portray.
Guest More than 1 year ago
clint eastwood makes a movie come alive. I enjoy all of his westerns.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A true film classic. The Oulaw Josey Wales is Clint Eastwood at his most dangerous as a revenge filled Missouri raider traveling to Texas with an ensemble group of people. The film boast some of the best sequences found in cinema. Josey's confrontation with the Union troopers is a classic. It was where Clint spoke one of the most famous line's in movie history, 'you gonna pull those pistols or whistle dixie'. Other famous scenes include the Josey's killing of a bounty hunter, which include's another famous one-liner 'dying aint much of a living boy' and the dialouge between Josey and the Comanche chief Ten Bears that bristle's with honest realism. Eastwood is truly the best cowboy in american cinema. His cowboys had a since of honest realism and uncompromising danger about them. They were men who knew how to survive at all cost. For me this is Eastwoods best 'western' performance hands down. Will Sampson fills his brief screen appearance as Ten Bears with a feeling of true emotion. A great performance. The defining supporting performance goes to Chief Dan George as Josey's Cherokee sidekick. Chief Dan George characterization is truly a work of art. Eastwoods direction is excellent and he moves the film along at a perfect pace. Clint's best.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Some 16 years before the Oscar laden and equally brilliant 'Unforgiven', this movie is seen by many as one of Clint Eastwoods finest movies, particularly in the Western genre. Playing the title role himself, we meet Josey Wales, a quiet farmer, abruptly thrown into the civil war after his land and family are attacked by Union soldiers, who joins up with the confederate fight in an almost guerilla / mercenary way. The civil War aspect of the story is little more than an opening skirmish however, as it is the subsequent fugitive aspect of the character that moves us through most of the picture. I have to disagree with those that think this is just a revenge movie, or that a single viewing is all one can manage, as the story unfolds in a multi faceted way with each succesive viewing, despite the viewer knowing the ending. Wales comes to be the guiding scout and protector to an unlikely and very mixed bag of characters (all played with sound realism)as he is continually and almost reluctantly hounded by his former ally Fletcher. Charged with hunting him down, Fletcher (played with a salty almost poetic grace by John Vernon) must accompany a band of 'red leg' Union soldiers, with more than questionable morality, to the border and this long pursuit helps the picture move at an even pace. Add some interesting subplots, commancheros, some imaginative and lively characters (with many of Eastwoods regular screen stars in various roles)and the overall effect is just right, without trying to be moralistic. Often brutal in it's depiction of the 'wild' west, and at times graphically violent keeps the deserved R rating, but some moments of comedy and pathos bring an unmistakable Eastwood handprint of direction, without overtaking the excellent story or script. Already widely received as a classic piece of filmaking, it has stood the test of time extremely well, and has become one of the movies that have benchmarked the genre since it's release almost thirty years ago. Extremely enjoyable movie.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this movie. It is perfect! Casting, setting, direction, editing and the most amazing story all add up to the very best American movie of all times.
jakemacd More than 1 year ago
The Outlaw Josie Wales was an effcient killing machine, easy to track. Just follow the trail of dead bodies. But he was so compassionate despite his vengeful anger. Along his bloody journey, he pulled so many folks out of desperate, dismal, hopeless places and even fed the buzzards along the way. Probably my favorite Eastwood. My recommendation below is not exactly in the same vein as Josie Wales but I highly recommend it just the same.
Western-Addict More than 1 year ago
Very well done, interesting story. The supporting cast is great, Eastwood does a superb job. Not a Spaghetti Western, but classic Clint Eastwood.
BudRY More than 1 year ago
Clint's westerns are truly classic and entertaining media. Love the supporting actors as well.
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