School of Flesh
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The School of Flesh

4.0 1
Director: Benoît Jacquot

Cast: Benoît Jacquot, Isabelle Huppert, Vincent Martinez, Vincent Lindon

     
 
Benoit Jacquot's School of Flesh works as much as a showcase for the understated acting skills of Isabelle Huppert as it does as an interesting romance. The movie looks quite stunning in a colorful, vibrant 2.35:1 widescreen presentation. Jacquot and cinematographer Caroline Champetier frequently bathe the entire frame in primary colors; a nightclub scene

Overview

Benoit Jacquot's School of Flesh works as much as a showcase for the understated acting skills of Isabelle Huppert as it does as an interesting romance. The movie looks quite stunning in a colorful, vibrant 2.35:1 widescreen presentation. Jacquot and cinematographer Caroline Champetier frequently bathe the entire frame in primary colors; a nightclub scene bursts off the screen as if the movie has been filmed in red and black. Unfortunately, the sound is overly tinny, though that might be an issue with the original soundtrack rather than the DVD. The sound quality isn't distracting enough to take one's interest from the movie, but a greater dynamic range would have been most welcome. The movie's sole supplemental feature is a blurb-heavy theatrical trailer, which really isn't worth a look. Judging by the praise heaped on Huppert by the trailer, one would think she had accomplished a great humanitarian feat, rather than simply turned in a quality performance. A "Scene Selections" menu gives immediate access to the DVD's 28 chapters via captions and still frames. Subtitles, available in English and Spanish, are presented in the lower black bar of the letterboxing in easy-to-read yellow text. School of Flesh is an intriguing movie and visually sumptuous on DVD.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
This second filming of the Yukio Mishima story School of Flesh transports it to contemporary France, and director Benoit Jacquot makes excellent use of the change, exploring the unspoken boundaries of race, class, sexual orientation, and age that persist even among Parisians who congratulate themselves on their urbanity. As the protagonist, a successful career woman on the far end of youth, Isabelle Huppert radiates a self-assurance capable of being punctured only by an uncontrollable passion. This she finds in the form of a part-time hustler/bartender played by Vincente Martinez in an excellent first performance. Focusing intently on the relationship of his leads, Jacquot lets the story unfold more through small details than major developments, which arrive with such foreshadowing that they seem like inevitabilities; the question isn't whether or not Martinez and Huppert's relationship will crumble, but when and how. Jacquot not only makes this a matter of great interest but, with a subtlety that's becoming a trademark, ties it into their overall cultural milieu. Beautifully played, it's a film about how youth invariably turns into maturity or destroys itself, and one that also offers sharp commentary on its own time and place.

Product Details

Release Date:
12/07/1999
UPC:
0043396043589
Original Release:
1998
Rating:
R
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital, stereo]
Time:
1:42:00

Special Features

Digitally remastered audio & anamorphic video; Interactive menus; Audio: Original French [Stereo]; Subtitles: English, French, Spanish; Scene selections; Theatrical trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Isabelle Huppert Dominique
Vincent Martinez Quentin
Vincent Lindon Chris
Marthe Keller Laurence Thorpe
François Berléand Soukaz
Daniele Dubroux Daniele
Bernard Le Coq David Cordier
Jean-Claude Dauphin Louis-Guy
Roxane Mesquida Marine Thorpe
Michelle Goddet Quentin's Mother
Jan-Michell Marcus

Technical Credits
Benoît Jacquot Director
Luc Barnier Editor
Caroline Champetier Cinematographer
Jacques Fieschi Screenwriter
Corinne Jorry-Horlait Costumes/Costume Designer
Jean-Claude Laureux Sound/Sound Designer
Vincent Malle Associate Producer
Frederique Moidon Casting
Antoine Santana Asst. Director
Brigitte Taillandier Sound/Sound Designer
Fabienne Tsai Executive Producer
Fabienne Vonier Producer
Claude Waringo Associate Producer
Katia Wyszkop Production Designer

Scene Index

Side #1 --
0. Scene Selections
1. Start [2:39]
2. Eye Contact [3:17]
3. Madame Thorpe [2:57]
4. Dinner Date [2:46]
5. The Arcade [2:25]
6. Sugar Mommy [3:23]
7. No Show [2:57]
8. Chris by Day [5:12]
9. "Live With Me." [2:07]
10. Temperate [2:25]
11. Soukaz [3:13]
12. The Party [7:23]
13. Quentin's Things [7:14]
14. Morocco [2:39]
15. "We Kidnapped Quentin." [2:39]
16. Making Love, Not War [3:29]
17. Louis [1:37]
18. Marine Thorpe [:50]
19. Fatherly Feelings [5:14]
20. Cordier [3:59]
21. "I Have to Go Away." [1:58]
22. Pick-Up Spot [2:36]
23. Double Date [4:28]
24. "I'm Getting Married." [1:37]
25. Duped [4:10]
26. The Dirt on Quentin [4:04]
27. Betrayed & Exhausted [7:24]
28. Many Months Later [6:43]

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The School of Flesh 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
''L'Ecole de la Chair'' (School of Flesh), a candidly modern take on the search for intimacy, is the basis of a sensuous, sexy, and painfully passionate love affair between an older woman and a younger man. Dominique (Isabelle Huppert), an successful older woman, coined as the ''poor little rich girl,'' meets Quentin (Vincent Martinez), a young street hustler with a mysterious background. From the start, and in spite of herself, Dominique responds to Quentin's obvious signs of interest, and they strike up a ''deal'': an affair, with no strings attached. Watch as these two beautifully sad beings duel for control and fight to entrap one another. Do they have a chance at true love? I'll never tell! A subtle yet powerful movie, with characters you'll never forget. Quintessentially French in many ways, this is a fabulous dramatization of Yukio Mishima's Japanese novel (roughly translated as ''School of Love''), adapted to modern-day France. ''The School of Flesh'' will not be liked by everyone, of course, but if you're looking for a quiet, painstaking anatomy of the intricacies of heterosexual love, especially of the May-December variety (with roles reversed, unlike most recent Hollywood films), this is the movie for you. Buy it TODAY! This is a difficult DVD to locate.