Shopworn Angel

The Shopworn Angel

Director: H.C. Potter

Cast: H.C. Potter, Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart, Walter Pidgeon

     
 
The second motion picture version of a Saturday Evening Post story by Dana Burnet, this romantic melodrama was also the second pairing of actors James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan. Stewart plays Private Bill Pettigrew, a naïve young Texan in New York for basic training prior to being shipped overseas to fight in WWI. When he is nearly run over by an automobile, he

Overview

The second motion picture version of a Saturday Evening Post story by Dana Burnet, this romantic melodrama was also the second pairing of actors James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan. Stewart plays Private Bill Pettigrew, a naïve young Texan in New York for basic training prior to being shipped overseas to fight in WWI. When he is nearly run over by an automobile, he meets its owner, Daisy Heath (Sullavan). A sophisticated entertainer, Daisy is taken with Bill's sweet, uncomplicated nature, and she agrees to a ruse when Bill asks her to pose has his girl in order to impress his Army bunkmates. Daisy's real boyfriend, Sam Bailey (Walter Pidgeon), is at first amused by Daisy's new friendship, but he soon becomes jealous of Bill's growing affection for Daisy. When Bill receives his orders, he begs Daisy to marry him, and although she doesn't really love him, Daisy can't reject a soldier who may be about to meet his maker, so a quickie ceremony is arranged. When word later comes that Bill has been killed on the front lines, a heartbroken Daisy realizes that she and Sam are taking each other for granted.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
The Shopworn Angel is a treacly and often unbelievable romance, redeemed by its luminous trio of stars. Waldo Salt's screenplay is manipulative to a fault, filled with plot points that are simply too artificial: can anyone honestly believe that Margaret Sullavan's character would really agree to marry James Stewart's soldier? The story's machinations force the actors to behave in ways that stretch credulity, with Sullavan and Walter Pidgeon asked to be Noble with a capital N and Stewart required to be Naïve (similarly capitalized). Fortunately, these three manage to pull it off -- and then some. Sullavan makes even the most extreme change of heart seem believable, and she finds surprising levels in even the most mundane sequences. Stewart is one of the few actors who could make such a hayseed into a living and breathing human being, and if Pidgeon is somewhat less successful than his co-stars, he still humanizes a stick figure very well. While Angel's limitations keep it from soaring, the actors manage to make it glide along quite nicely. (Fans of Mary Martin may also want to give Angel a whirl; the Broadway legend provides Sullavan's singing voice.)

Product Details

Release Date:
03/23/2009
UPC:
0883316126769
Original Release:
1938
Rating:
NR
Source:
Warner Archives
Presentation:
[B&W, Full Frame]
Time:
1:25:00
Sales rank:
38,021

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Margaret Sullavan Daisy Heath
James Stewart Pvt. Bill Pettigrew
Walter Pidgeon Sam Bailey
Hattie McDaniel Martha the Maid
Nat Pendleton Dice
Alan Curtis Guy with Thin Lips
Sam Levene Leer
Eleanor Lynn Sally the Waitress
Charles D. Brown McGonigle
Wade Boteler Irish Policeman
Don Brodie Attendant
Jimmy Butler Elevator Boy
Eddy Chandler Corporal
George Chandler Soldier
Roger Converse Hotel Clerk
Mary Dees Actor
James Flavin Guard
Wesley Giraud Bellboy
Dorothy Granger Dancer
Charles Grapewin Wilson the Caretaker
Virginia Grey Chorus Girl
Grace Hayle Mistress of Ceremonies
Mary Howard Actor
Edward Keane Captain
Paul Kruger Riveter
Francisco Maran Headwaiter
Frank McGlynn Motorcyclist
John Merton Speaker
Jack Murphy Sailor
Hudson Shotwell Jack the Soldier
William Stack Minister
Harry Tyler Eddy

Technical Credits
H.C. Potter Director
Adrian Costumes/Costume Designer
Dana Burnet Original Story
Cedric Gibbons Art Director
Donn W. Hayes Editor
Joseph L. Mankiewicz Producer
Val Raset Choreography
Joseph Ruttenberg Cinematographer
Waldo Salt Screenwriter
Slavko Vorkapich Special Effects
Edward Ward Score Composer
Edwin B. Willis Art Director,Set Decoration/Design
Joseph C. Wright Art Director

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