The Tenant

( 4 )

Overview

Director Roman Polanski casts himself in the lead of the psychological thriller The Tenant. Trelkovsky Polanski rents an apartment in a spooky old residential building, where his neighbors -- mostly old recluses -- eye him with suspicious contempt. Upon discovering that the apartment's previous tenant, a beautiful young woman, jumped from the window in a suicide attempt, Trelkovsky begins obsessing over the dead woman. Growing increasingly paranoid, Trelkovsky convinces himself that his neighbors plan to kill ...
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Overview

Director Roman Polanski casts himself in the lead of the psychological thriller The Tenant. Trelkovsky Polanski rents an apartment in a spooky old residential building, where his neighbors -- mostly old recluses -- eye him with suspicious contempt. Upon discovering that the apartment's previous tenant, a beautiful young woman, jumped from the window in a suicide attempt, Trelkovsky begins obsessing over the dead woman. Growing increasingly paranoid, Trelkovsky convinces himself that his neighbors plan to kill him. He even comes to the conclusion that Stella Isabel Adjani, the woman he has fallen in love with, is in on the "plot." Ultimately, Polanski assumes the identity of the suicide victim -- and inherits her self-destructive urges. Some critics found the movie tedious and overdone; others compared it to Polanski's early breakthrough, Repulsion. The film was based on Le Locataire Chimerique, a novel by Roland Topor.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/27/2013
  • EAN: 8809154130630
  • Original Release: 1976
  • Source: Imports
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 6,616

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Roman Polanski Trelkovsky
Isabelle Adjani Stella
Melvyn Douglas Monsieur Zy
Jo Van Fleet Madame Dioz
Bernard Fresson Scope
Shelley Winters Concierge
Lila Kedrova Gaderian
Rufus Badar
Claude Dauphin Man in Car
Folco Jacques Monod Cafe Owner
Jean-Pierre Bagot Policeman
Josiane Balasko Viviane
Michel Blanc Scope's Neighbor
Florence Blot Mme. Zy
Romain Bouteille Simon
Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu Bar Waiter
Alain Frerot Beggar
Eva Ionesco Mme. Gaderian's Daughter
Gérard Jugnot Trelkovsky's co-worker
Helena Manson Head Nurse
Maite Nahyr Lucille
André Penvern Cafe Waiter
Claude Piéplu Neighbor
Serge Spira Philippe
Francois Viaur Police Sergeant
Technical Credits
Roman Polanski Director, Screenwriter
Hercules Bellville Executive Producer
Françoise Bonnot Editor
Gérard Brach Screenwriter
Andrew Braunsberg Producer
Marc Grunebaum Asst. Director
Pierre Guffroy Production Designer
Claude Moesching Art Director
Sven Nykvist Cinematographer
Albert Rajau Art Director
Hubert Rostaing Musical Direction/Supervision
Philippe Sarde Score Composer
Alain Sarde Associate Producer
Eric Simon Production Designer, Set Decoration/Design
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A serious movie?

    A lot of people look at Roman Polanski's other movies and don't know what to make of them. Are they to be taken seriously? Is THE NINTH GATE really a thriller, or a comedy, or both? I think that the key to Polanski's work is THE TENANT. This is a thriller, which on the surface seems like a dead-serious movie...but Polanski injects so much bizarre, edgy comedy into it that in the end, you wind up in a place where you're not sure whether to laugh or be moved. It's a very special, very unique, very thrilling film that also happens to be very funny. Intentionally so.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Human heads make great basketballs!

    You will never look at a staircase in quite the same way again. Pushing just about every button that's connected to something you don't want to think about, Roman Polanski's The Tenant is hilarious and deeply disturbing. One of the sickest, most cynical, bitter, emotionally cruel films I've ever seen. It's wonderful!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2002

    SPOOKY IN THE EXTREME

    The Tenant truly is an unsettling experience...everything about it is spooky. From the opening credits..to the music..to the strange assortment of characters. Polanski as usual displays his subtlety, sardonaic wit and his masterful skills as a director.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2001

    My all-time favorite film

    This is my all-time favorite movie, so automatically I'm biased. But I'll try to be objective; I realize the movie isn't perfect. But it is without a doubt one of Roman Polanski's most personally significant films; not only is it the third film of a trilogy comprised with REPULSION and ROSEMARY'S BABY, but along with his next film TESS, it is one of the films that most accurately captures the director's aesthetic: one of absurd, hopeless despair. Nowhere are his films more pervaded with a sense of doom and tragedy than in this one (with the exception of his incredible adaptation of MACBETH). Polanski himself plays the title role of a timid man who stumbles onto a small, seedy Parisian apartment in a biulding populated mostly by bitter elderly couples. Almost immediately he is mystified by the suicide of the previous tenant (whom he goes to see in the hospital, only to find a comatose wreck swathed in bandages like a mummy). He snoops through her left-behind belongings, reads all her old letters and books, and eventually begins to wear her makeup and clothing, going so far as to purchase a wig and high-heels. He even courts the dead girl's friend (Isabelle Adjani, looking rather frumpy). All of this is done rather unconsciously; he seems to black out during these transvestite episodes, during which he experiences frightening hallucinations. He believes that the neighbors are subtly trying to drive him insane. A very macabre film, but tinged with dazed humor. A fitting end to the aforementioned trilogy of psychological case studies begun with REPULSION. If you enjoyed that film and/or ROSEMARY'S BABY, you might enjoy this one. Of course, it's directed with typical flair, and the score by Phillipe Sarde is very suitable to the film. Sven Nykvist (Ingmar Bergman's cinematographer) does a good job of contributing to the feel of the movie. Not up to the standards of the previous CHINATOWN on the level of entertainment, but a fascinating film in its own right and, in my opinion, one of the director's truly unique films.

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