The Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder - Punk and New Wave

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Overview

Tom Snyder made a valiant effort to keep up with the times during the nine-year run of his talk show Tomorrow, and when punk rock began to appear on the nation's cultural radar in the late '70s, Snyder invited a few noted figures of the new movement onto the show, though there was usually a puzzling or amusing degree of disconnect between host and guest, since it was invariably obvious that Snyder just didn't understand the stuff. Eight episodes of the Tomorrow show are included on this two-DVD set from Shout ...
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Overview

Tom Snyder made a valiant effort to keep up with the times during the nine-year run of his talk show Tomorrow, and when punk rock began to appear on the nation's cultural radar in the late '70s, Snyder invited a few noted figures of the new movement onto the show, though there was usually a puzzling or amusing degree of disconnect between host and guest, since it was invariably obvious that Snyder just didn't understand the stuff. Eight episodes of the Tomorrow show are included on this two-DVD set from Shout Factory, each of which features at least one noted act from the punk
ew wave scene. The first and most unintentionally comical is an October 11, 1977, show in which noted concert promoter Bill Graham, Los Angeles Times rock critic Robert Hilburn, and producer Kim Fowley discuss the then brand-new phenomenon of punk; within minutes, it's painfully obvious that Fowley is the only one who knows the slightest thing about punk, and he'd much rather talk about himself than anything else, so the result is like watching a handful of vegans attempting to explain how to throw a pig roast. Later on, Paul Weller of the Jam and Joan Jett then still in the Runaways drop by, and while they're obviously much better clued in, Weller's level of cool prevents him from bonding well with his fellow guests, and Jett has to explain that while she likes punk rock, that isn't quite what she does, leading to further confusion. Television has seen few such moments since Steve Allen thought it would be funny to force Elvis Presley to sing to a dog in 1956. The other seven shows feature interviews with Patti Smith loopy but charming and John Lydon somewhere between hostile and deliberately blank, and both performances and chat segments from Elvis Costello, Iggy Pop, the Ramones, the Jam, and the Plasmatics the latter featuring Wendy O. Williams blowing up a car to the delight of her fans. Technically, all the shows are presented in their original full-frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1, and the audio has been mastered in Dolby Digital Stereo, retaining the original monophonic sound mix of the initial broadcasts. The programs are in English, with no multiple language options or subtitles included. In addition to the interviews and performances featuring musicians, the bulk of the rest of the original shows have been included as well though Rona Barrett's segments from the Tomorrow Coast to Coast edition of the show have been excised, meaning some incongruous but interesting interviews also appear on the set, most notably a chat with veteran filmmaker Frank Capra. The quality of the original source materials is generally good; while some occasional flaws are apparent, these discs look quite well considering the age of the tapes, and this set is a fascinating time capsule for folks looking to recall a day when punk rock wasn't readily available at the local shopping mall.
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Special Features

[None specified]
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Bill Pearis
With a drink in one hand and a cigarette in the other, talk-show host Tom Snyder became a late-night TV fixture in the 1970s on the loose, informal Tomorrow Show. Snyder was a meat-and-potatoes kind of guy who probably bought Playboy for the articles and considered Marvin Hamlisch a cutting-edge musician. Rock 'n' roll was outside his lexicon, let alone the strange, scary sounds that were punk and new wave. That didn't stop his producers from booking bands as guests, and this two-disc set collects some of the most notable performances and interviews. Snyder's admitted ignorance of the music made for unintentionally hilarious television. The set begins with a show dedicated to the punk rock phenomena, taped October 11, 1977, at the height of British tabloids' obsession with the Sex Pistols and punk. Snyder -- who says, at one point, "From what I understand it's not even music" -- leads a roundtable discussion with legendary concert promoter Bill Graham, Los Angeles Times rock critic Robert Hilburn, and record producer/raconteur Kim Fowley before bringing out a very young Joan Jett and the Jam's Paul Weller to join the discussion. When the Jam return to the show on May 27, 1981 -- with blistering performances of "Pretty Green" and "Funeral Pyre" -- Snyder seems to have no recollection that Weller has been on before. Other performers plugging in for this set include Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, and Elvis Costello & the Attractions. In a moment that was about as wild as it gets, the Plasmatics even blew up a car during their act, disrupting the NBC Nightly News, which was being aired live while Tomorrow was being recorded. Whole episodes are included, giving nice context to the footage. For example, the June 25, 1980, show features Snyder’s infamous interview with John Lydon, a.k.a. Johnny Rotten. The former Sex Pistol's surly attitude could've had something to do with Tom's first guest, Hollywood producer Alan Carr, who was there to promote the Village People movie, Can't Stop the Music. The Lydon interview, if you can call it that, remains one of the most excruciatingly painful five minutes ever to air on network TV -- but it is just one of many moments that make The Tomorrow Show - Punk and New Wave worth owning.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/24/2006
  • UPC: 826663814590
  • Rating:

  • Source: Shout Factory
  • Aspect Ratio: Pre-1954 Standard (1.33.1)
  • Sound: Dolby Digital Stereo
  • Language: English
  • Time: 5:00:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Elvis Costello Performer
Iggy Pop Performer
The Ramones Performer
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Menu

Disc #1 -- The Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder: Punk and New Wave
   Play All
   Just The Punks
   Shows
      Play All
      October 11, 1977: Joan Jett, Paul Weller, Bill Graham & Kim Fowley
      Februaru 3, 1981|: Elvis Costello and The Attractions
      February 12, 1981: Iggy Pop
      May 20, 1981: The Plasmatics
   Songs
      Play All
      Elvis Costello-February 3, 1981
         New Lace Sleeves
         Watch Your Step
      Iggy Pop - February 12, 1981
         Dog Food
         Five Foot One
         TV Eye
      The Plasmatics - May 20, 1981
         Head Banger
         Master Plan
Disc #2 -- The Show with Tom Snyder: Punk and New Wave
   Play All
   Just The Punks
   Shows
      Play All
      May 11, 1978: Patti Smith
      June 25, 1980: John Lydon
      May 27, 1981: The Jam
      September 1, 1981: The Ramones
   Songs
      Play All
      The Jam - May 27, 1981
         Pretty Green
         Funeral Pyre
      The Ramones - September 1, 1981
         We Want The Airwaves
         I Wanna Be Seated
         The KKK Took My Baby Away
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Would love to see more of Tom Snyder on DVD

    If you were a fan of Tom Snyder in the 70's are early 80's you'll love this DVD even if you are into punk/new wave or not. Would love to see a "BEST OF" collection released. Glad to see the "John Paul Tom, and Ringo collection being released in April. Might also check out the Tom Synder Grateful Dead collection

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews