The Untouchables

( 22 )

Overview

Like the TV series that shared the same title, The Untouchables 1987 was an account of the battle between gangster Al Capone and lawman Eliot Ness, this time in the form of a feature film boasting big stars, a big budget, and a script from respected playwright David Mamet. Kevin Costner stars as Ness, a federal agent who has come to Chicago during the Prohibition Era, when corruption in the local police department is rampant. His mission is to put crime lord Capone Robert DeNiro out of business, but Capone is so ...
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Overview

Like the TV series that shared the same title, The Untouchables 1987 was an account of the battle between gangster Al Capone and lawman Eliot Ness, this time in the form of a feature film boasting big stars, a big budget, and a script from respected playwright David Mamet. Kevin Costner stars as Ness, a federal agent who has come to Chicago during the Prohibition Era, when corruption in the local police department is rampant. His mission is to put crime lord Capone Robert DeNiro out of business, but Capone is so powerful and popular that Ness is not taken seriously by the law or the press. One night, discouraged, he meets a veteran patrolman, Jimmy Malone Sean Connery, and discovers that the acerbic Irishman is the one honest man he's been seeking. Malone has soon helped Ness recruit a gunslinger rookie, George Stone Andy Garcia and, joined by nebbish accountant Oscar Wallace Charles Martin Smith, the men doggedly pursue Capone and his illegal interests. At first a laughingstock, Ness soon has Capone outraged over his and Malone's sometimes law-bending tactics, and the vain mobster strikes back in vicious style. Ultimately, it is the most unexpected and minor of crimes, tax evasion, which proves Capone's undoing. All of the credits for The Untouchables boasted big names, including music from Ennio Morricone and costumes by Giorgio Armani. Director Brian DePalma continued his tradition of including a homage to past masters of the cinema with a taut stairway shoot-out reminiscent of a similar sequence in Sergei Eisenstein's The Battleship Potemkin 1925.
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
The Prohibition-era reign of mob kingpin Al Capone is dramatized in The Untouchables, a colorful, stylishly violent drama graced with a superb script by David Mamet and flamboyantly directed by Brian De Palma Scarface. Nominally based on the popular '60s TV show and even more nominally on the bestselling memoir from which it was adapted, De Palma's film depicts Chicago during the Depression years as a booze-soaked, crime-ridden, hopelessly corrupt city held captive by vicious gangsters and crooked officials. Sincere but naive federal agent Eliot Ness Kevin Costner, assigned to find the weak link in Capone's chain of command, handpicks a team of similarly dedicated subordinates, among them streetwise Irish cop Jim Malone Sean Connery in an Oscar-winning characterization. Robert De Niro contributes a deliberately florid performance as the beefy, swaggering Capone. De Palma dramatizes the events of Ness's campaign with operatic fervor; his movie is less concerned with busting the booze racket than it is with treachery, murder, and retribution. His bravura directorial approach extends to the crafting of action set pieces, especially a climactic train-station shootout that echoes the Odessa Steps sequence in Potemkin.
All Movie Guide - Dan Jardine
Brian De Palma's strikingly authentic re-creation of 1930s gangster films and Prohibition-era Chicago is dominated by the performance of Best Supporting Actor Oscar-winner Sean Connery as Jim Malone. Malone's mentorship of Eliot Ness (Kevin Costner), guiding him from his initial, Dudley Do Right-esque altruism to a more grimly realistic law-enforcement agent, gives the film its emotional anchor. Costner's white-bread Ness and De Niro's grandiose Capone pale in comparison to the charismatic Connery. Ennio Morricone's lush score and Stephen H. Burum's classy, high-gloss cinematography may romanticize the oft-gruesome violence, but both are well-suited to the approach taken by screenwriter David Mamet, who attempts to raise the pulp features from the original TV drama to high art. The film climaxes in a Union Station shoot-out that is De Palma's stylish homage to the "Odessa steps" sequence in director Sergei Eisenstein's seminal Battleship Potemkin.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/2/2010
  • UPC: 032429078575
  • Original Release: 1987
  • Rating:

  • Source: Paramount
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Wide Screen
  • Sound: Dolby Digital Surround, Dolby Digital Surround EX
  • Language: English, Français
  • Time: 1:59:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Kevin Costner Eliot Ness
Sean Connery Jim Malone
Charles Martin Smith Oscar Wallace
Andy Garcia George Stone
Robert De Niro Al Capone
Richard Bradford Mike
Jack Kehoe Walter Payne
Brad Sullivan George
Billy Drago Frank Nitti
Patricia Clarkson Catherine Ness
Jennifer Anglim Woman in Elevator
Patrick Billingsley Bailiff
Michael P. Byrne Ness's Clerk
Mali Finn
Clifton James
Louie Lanciloti Barber
Tony Mockus Judge
Meldoy Rae Union Station Woman
Lynn Stalmaster
Vince Viverito Sr. Italian Waiter
Tim Gamble Reporter
Vito D'Ambrosio Bow Tie Driver
Steve Goldstein Scoop
Peter Aylward Lt. Alderson
Don Harvey Preseuski
Robert Swan Mountie Captain
John J. Walsh Bartender
Del Close Alderman
Colleen Bade Mrs. Blackmer
Greg Noonan Rangemaster
Sean Grennan Cop Cousin
Kevin Michael Doyle Williamson
Mike Bacarella Overcoat Hood
Aditra Kohl Blackmer Girl
Charles Keller Watson Reporter
Larry Brandenburg Reporter
Chelcie Ross Reporter
Sam Smiley Bailiff
John Bracci Fat Man
Eddie Minasian Butler
Will Zahrn Defense Attorney
Clem Caserta Bodyguard
Bob Martana Bodyguard
Valentino Cimo Bodyguard
Robert Miranda Gunned Head
James Guthrie Pagliacci
Basil Reale Hotel Clerk
Kaitlin Montgomery Ness's Daughter
Joe V. Greco Bodyguard
Michael Byrne Ness's Clerk
Technical Credits
Brian De Palma Director, Screenwriter
Patrizia Von Brandenstein Production Designer
Richard Bruno Costumes/Costume Designer
Stephen H. Burum Cinematographer
E.C. Chen Set Decoration/Design
Gil Clayton Set Decoration/Design
William Elliott Art Director
Mali Finn Casting
Hal G. Gausman Set Decoration/Design
Jerry Greenberg Editor
Jim Halty Stunts
Michael Hancock Makeup
Ray Hartwick Associate Producer
Gary Hymes Stunts
Nicolas Laborczy Set Decoration/Design
Art Linson Producer
David Mamet Screenwriter
Ennio Morricone Score Composer
Joe Napolitano Asst. Director
Bill Pankow Editor
Douglas Ryan Camera Operator
Steve Sardanis Set Decoration/Design
Lynn Stalmaster Casting
Jim Tanenbaum Sound/Sound Designer
Marilyn Vance Costumes/Costume Designer
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Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Opening Credits [2:43]
2. The Time of Al Capone [3:32]
3. At Home With Eliot Ness [:25]
4. Ness Speaks Out [1:35]
5. First Plan [2:22]
6. Ness Meets Malone [2:13]
7. The Ness Mess [3:06]
8. Malone Advises [3:05]
9. Building the Team [:33]
10. First Raid [3:33]
11. Celebration [2:24]
12. A Bribe [4:02]
13. Protecting the Family [2:08]
14. Canadian Confiscation [2:12]
15. Capone Strikes Back [2:00]
16. Ness Swears Revenge [2:07]
17. A Night at the Opera [2:54]
18. 1634 Racine [2:24]
19. A Final Gesture [1:11]
20. The Station Steps [2:53]
21. Courtroom [3:07]
22. Ness' Justice [6:07]
23. Finale [4:47]
24. End Credits [1:39]
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Menu

Side #1 --
   Play
   Set Up
      Audio Options: English 5.1 Surround EX
      Audio Options: English Dolby Surround
      Audio Options: Français
      Subtitle Options: English
      Subtitle Options: Español
      Subtitle Options: None
   Special Features
      The Script, The Cast
      Production Stories
      Re-Inventing The Genre
      The Classic
      Original Featurette - The Men
      Theatrical Trailer
   Scene Selection
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2013

    Action Packed Intense Must See Movie!

    Armed with an all-star cast, Costner, Connery, and De Niro, take you on an action packed journey to coral Al Capone. Set in 1920's Chicago, the backdrop highlights the manhunt to put Capone behind bars. Action and suspense round out the acting in this movie.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    A True Classic

    Sean Connery, Robert De Niro and Kevin Costner recreate the era of big crime during prohibition in Chicargo. This movie has it all, drama, sorrow and a bit of humor to portray all the characters.
    It's great and it's timeless. It stands up today as it did in 1987.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Sad But True

    A well-written, superbly acted movie telling the story of Eliot Ness - a government employee tasked with stopping other Americans from drinking alcohol - and his band of fellow “law enforcement” officers. Robert DeNiro, Andy Garcia, and Sean Connery are outstanding and completely convincing even Kevin Costner, as Eliot Ness, holds his own. The movie is exciting, entertaining, and a wonderful lesson to modern day America. The War on Booze has been replaced by the equally absurd War on Drugs, in which we free men allow other free men to tell us what we can drink, smoke, or shoot into our own bodies. When all is said and done, this movie, which puts Eliot Ness on a pedestal, is a sad testament to the American citizen’s willingness to allow the political class to treat us as if we were children.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    right up there with the godfather

    i absolutely love this movie-the plot, the actors. if you liked the godfather then you'll love this movie!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    King of the Mob Flicks

    The Untouchables is the best mob movie ever. It has an all star cast and the best performances. It easily falls into the file of classics and earns the title 'best gangster flick'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2004

    The Best Mob Movie since "The Godfather"

    Brian Depalma's great 1987 gangster hit "The Untouchables" is, in my opinion, the best mob movie ever made since "The Godfather". Everything in this movie from the action, the music, the costumes, etc. was absolutely first-rate. The performances were awesome! Kevin Costner turned in a great performance as federal agent Eliot Ness, Charles Martin Smith fit the role of the accountant Oscar Wallace like a glove, Cuban-born Andy Garcia was a natural to play the young rookie Italian-American sharpshooter George Stone, and Sean Connery definitely deserved to win the academy award for his portrayal of the old, feisty Irish-American cop Jimmy Malone. But the one who did a really superb job was Robert De Niro in his brief, but memorable turn as the infamous chicago crime boss, Al Capone. I could watch this movie a million times and never get tired of it. I have related items from the movie(i.e. a movie magazine, the soundtrack on CD, and the novelization from Ivy Books). The Untouchables will always be one of my favorite all-time gangster films for years to come! I truly recommend this film to anyone who is a fan of the mobster film genre.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Really good

    The Prohibition-era reign of mob kingpin Al Capone is dramatized in The Untouchables, a colorful, stylishly violent drama graced with a superb script by David Mamet and flamboyantly directed by Brian De Palma (Scarface). Nominally based on the popular '60s TV show (and even more nominally on the bestselling memoir from which it was adapted), De Palma's film depicts Chicago during the Depression years as a booze-soaked, crime-ridden, hopelessly corrupt city held captive by vicious gangsters and crooked officials. Sincere but naive federal agent Eliot Ness (Kevin Costner), assigned to find the weak link in Capone's chain of command, handpicks a team of similarly dedicated subordinates, among them streetwise Irish cop Jim Malone (Sean Connery in an Oscar-winning characterization). Robert De Niro contributes a deliberately florid performance as the beefy, swaggering Capone. De Palma dramatizes the events of Ness's campaign with operatic fervor; his movie is less concerned with busting the booze racket than it is with treachery, murder, and retribution. His bravura directorial approach extends to the crafting of action set pieces, especially a climactic train-station shootout that echoes the Odessa Steps sequence in Potemkin. Paramount's DVD includes the original theatrical trailer. Ed Hulse

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    UNBEATABLE WORK

    Sean Connery's Oscar winning performance as willy Irish cop Jimmy Malone is almost enough to make you forget him as 007. If this isn't Connery's best work, it's close. Brian DePalma's magnificant version of American crime legend and perhaps myth, is one of 1987's best films and while historians know the bulk of this tale isn't true (Frank Nitty going off the roof to his death the most noteable) it plays with its own greatness. Robert Stack could have made a cameo and not made it hokey.

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    Posted March 24, 2010

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    Posted October 28, 2009

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    Posted March 11, 2010

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    Posted June 23, 2010

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    Posted October 27, 2008

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    Posted May 27, 2010

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    Posted January 9, 2010

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews