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Voice of the Turtle
     

The Voice of the Turtle

Director: Irving Rapper,

Cast: Irving Rapper, Ronald Wilson Reagan, Eleanor Parker, Eve Arden

 
John Van Druten's Broadway hit The Voice of the Turtle was purchased by Warner Bros. as a vehicle for...well, in all likelihood, stars Eleanor Parker and Ronald Reagan were both second choices. Reagan is a returning GI who falls in love with Parker, an ingenuous young actress. Circumstances require the hero and heroine to share the same apartment, though the

Overview

John Van Druten's Broadway hit The Voice of the Turtle was purchased by Warner Bros. as a vehicle for...well, in all likelihood, stars Eleanor Parker and Ronald Reagan were both second choices. Reagan is a returning GI who falls in love with Parker, an ingenuous young actress. Circumstances require the hero and heroine to share the same apartment, though the implications don't get much farther than the knowing wisecracks of supporting player Eve Arden. The original play's stars were Elliott Nugent and the matchless Margaret Sullavan, and both Reagan and Parker seem overwhelmed by the responsibility of filling those shoes. Nothing in The Voice of the Turtle (reissue title: One for the Book) is quite as funny as the film's outtakes, which were widely distributed during the Reagan presidency on the basis of a scene in which an increasingly testy Reagan is unable to zip up his trousers.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
The Voice of the Turtle is an amiable little romantic comedy that doesn't attempt too much but does what it sets out to do in a modest and engaging manner. Based upon John Van Druten's wartime hit play, Turtle is very much a by-the-numbers film. There's very little that happens that the audience can't see coming, but it's written in such a way that what could come across as manipulative and predictable seems rather natural and inevitable. The dialogue is lively and often inventive, especially the wisecracks created for Eve Arden, who certainly knows how to deliver a stinger for maximum effect. As a matter of fact, though her role is the least of the three principals, Arden dominates the film with her knowing, perfectly modulated performance. Ronald Reagan is less impressive, but he's certainly affable, which is crucial to the success of the film. Eleanor Parker, lovely to look at as always, is not at her best, seeming at times as if she had been directed to play the role like Margaret Sullavan, who originated the part on-stage; however, when Parker does get to relax and be herself, she shines. Irving Rapper has directed smoothly, and he and the screenwriters have done a very good job of opening up the small-cast, one-set play for film.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/30/2012
UPC:
0883316316948
Original Release:
1947
Rating:
NR
Source:
Warner Archives
Region Code:
0
Presentation:
[Full Frame]
Time:
1:43:00
Sales rank:
14,269

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ronald Reagan Sgt. Bill Page
Eleanor Parker Sally Middleton
Eve Arden Olive Lashbrooke
Wayne Morris Cmdr. Ned Burling
Kent Smith Kenneth Bartlett
John Emery George Harrington
Erskine Sanford Storekeeper
John Holland Henry Atherton
Richard Bartell Ticket Agent
Frank Wilcox Stanley Blake
Suzanne Dulier French-Speaking Couple
Bernard DeRoux French-Speaking Waiter
Ernest Anderson Elevator Man
Louis Austin Theater Party
Peter Camlin French-speaking person
Tristram Coffin Theater Party
Bunty Cutler Girl at Telephone
Sarah Edwards Woman
Ross Ford Soda Clerk
Alan Foster Vendor
William Gould Man
Doris Kemper Woman in Delicatessen
Douglas Kennedy Naval Officer
Jack Lee Director
Brian O'Hara Box-Office Clerk
Nino Pepitone Headwaiter
Robert Spencer Boy
Nick Stewart Elevator Boy
Helen Wallace Woman
Janet Warren Part of a theater party
Philip Morris Doorman

Technical Credits
Irving Rapper Director
Harry Barndollar Special Effects
Edwin DuPar Special Effects
Rudi Fehr Editor
Leo F. Forbstein Musical Direction/Supervision
Robert M. Haas Art Director
Charles Hoffman Producer,Screenwriter
William L. Kuehl Set Decoration/Design
Sol Polito Cinematographer
Leah Rhodes Costumes/Costume Designer
Max Steiner Score Composer
John Van Druten Screenwriter

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