Wind Will Carry Us

The Wind Will Carry Us

Director: Abbas Kiarostami, Behzad Dourani, The Inhabitants of the Siah Dareh village

Cast: Abbas Kiarostami, Behzad Dourani, The Inhabitants of the Siah Dareh village

     
 

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This idiosyncratic drama from Iran begins as a jeep winds through the hills of Kurdistan, containing an engineer (Behzad Dourani) and his two assistants (whom we never see) as they search for a small village in the mountains. When they arrive, they are greeted by a young boy, who shows them a place they can stay and guides the engineer to the home of an old woman

Overview

This idiosyncratic drama from Iran begins as a jeep winds through the hills of Kurdistan, containing an engineer (Behzad Dourani) and his two assistants (whom we never see) as they search for a small village in the mountains. When they arrive, they are greeted by a young boy, who shows them a place they can stay and guides the engineer to the home of an old woman (also never seen) who seems to be dying. No one is sure what the engineer and his men are doing there; some locals think he's keeping watch of the old woman and wants to purchase her land when she dies, while others think he could be an archeologist searching for rare artifacts. Meanwhile, the engineer spends his days exploring the village and the people who live there -- most of them women, with the men away at jobs that occupy them night and day for several months out of the year. He also stays in touch with the boy, who watches over the old woman's health while keeping up with his schoolwork, working on his family's farm, and helping his mother with the household chores. Meanwhile, the engineer periodically gets calls on his cellular phone, which require him to drive to a graveyard on a hill to receive the call (most, however, are wrong numbers), while making contact with a man digging a deep hole (also unseen) and a girl in the village who milk's cows which are kept in a dark basement. Concentrating on what we don't see as often as what we do, Le Vent Nous Emportera bears the distinctive stamp of director Abbas Kiarostami and was embraced by critics in its screening at the 1999 Venice Film Festival.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Tom Wiener
Only a filmmaker as gifted as Abbas Kiarostami could take the familiar fish-out-of-water story and invest it with such fresh ideas. The Wind Will Carry Us is a kind of twin cousin to Bill Forsyth's wry comedy Local Hero, in which a high-tech American professional meets his match in a remote Scottish fishing village. The running joke in Forsyth's film was that Mac (Peter Riegert) had to use a lonely phone booth (which became a tourist attraction when Hero gained a cult following) to communicate with his corporate boss (Burt Lancaster) back in Houston. That's matched here by the Engineer (Behzad Dourani) having to drive to the top of a hill to get his cell phone to work every time he talks with his boss back in Tehran. The Iranian village of Siah Dareh, tucked into the side of a hill, is surrounded by undulating hills of green and gold, and Kiarostami's camera alternates between long shots of the Engineer's travels down one-lane dusty roads and medium shots of his climbing around the almost vertical village. The Engineer's mission, to capture on film a rarely seen ritual that will attend the death of a local woman, is put on hold (just as Mac's attempted purchase of the Scottish village for an oil refinery is put off by an old man who holds out) when the woman stubbornly clings to life. The Engineer is by turns impatient, then fascinated with the simplicity of life in the hinterlands. The villagers are friendly but wary, too, of this stranger; their first instinct is to welcome him, but they do wonder at his motives, as he decides to be discreet and not reveal them. Our view is limited almost entirely to what the Engineer sees and hears, and many of the film's characters remain hidden from our sight, from the Engineer's crew and boss to a mysterious man digging a hole on top of what should be known as Cell Phone Hill to the digger's furtive lover to, of course, the dying woman, whose blue-framed window the Engineer only gazes at from a distance. A local boy named Farzad is the Engineer's one-man welcoming committee and source of information; we are given no more data than the Engineer gets. In its framing devices, which often isolate a figure in a landscape, Wind is also reminiscent of L'Avventura, though Kiarostami doesn't present a bleak portrait of alienation the way Antonioni did. He's curious about the way pockets of his country cling to the old ways, whether they're death rituals or simply ignoring much of what the modern world has to offer in the way of cell phones and convenience stores.
Village Voice - J. Hoberman
To my mind, the greatest film by Iranian master Abbas Kiarostami.
New York Times - A.O. Scott
Its effects seem more like those of a poem or a piece of music than a movie. Requires the reverent darkness and communal solitude of a theater.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/22/2014
UPC:
0741952775591
Original Release:
1999
Rating:
NR
Source:
Cohen Media Group
Time:
1:58:00
Sales rank:
14,770

Special Features

Filmed conversation between director Abbas Kiarostami and Richard Peña Feature-length commentary by critic Jonathan Rosenbaum and scholar Mehrnaz Saeed-Vafa New essay by critic Peter Tonguette 2014 re-release trailer

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Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Disc #1 --The Wind Will Carry Us
1. Are We There Yet? [9:43]
2. The Village [9:47]
3. Tea And No Sympathy [8:47]
4. Higher Ground [8:57]
5. Casual Conversation [9:46]
6. Has She Eaten Or Not? [8:36]
7. The Teacher [12:26]
8. "The Wind Will Carry Us!" [13:32]
9. Wandering The Graveyard [9:27]
10. It's Over [9:52]
11. The Doctor's Wisdom [9:46]
12. Morning [7:43]
1. Chapter 1 [9:47]
2. Chapter 2 [10:09]
3. Chapter 3 [10:08]
4. Chapter 4 [9:49]
5. Chapter 5 [10:44]
6. Chapter 6 [9:43]
7. Chapter 7 [9:45]
8. Chapter 8 [10:05]
9. Chapter 9 [8:48]

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