Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train

Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train

5.0 1
Director: Patrice Chéreau, Pascal Greggory, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi

Cast: Patrice Chéreau, Pascal Greggory, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi

     
 
Patrice Chereau (Queen Margot) directed this French drama about a train trip to an artist's funeral. Friends of painter Jean-Baptiste Emmerich (Jean-Louis Trintignant, seen in flashbacks) gather at a Paris railroad station for a four-hour journey to Limoges, where Emmerich wanted to be buried. The dozen travelers include art historian Francois (Pascal Greggory)

Overview

Patrice Chereau (Queen Margot) directed this French drama about a train trip to an artist's funeral. Friends of painter Jean-Baptiste Emmerich (Jean-Louis Trintignant, seen in flashbacks) gather at a Paris railroad station for a four-hour journey to Limoges, where Emmerich wanted to be buried. The dozen travelers include art historian Francois (Pascal Greggory) and his lover Louis (Bruno Todeschini), who develops an interest in teenage Bruno (Sylvain Jacques). Traveling parallel with the train is a station wagon with Jean-Baptiste's body, and this vehicle is driven by Thierry (Roschdy Zem), husband of Catherine (Dominique Blanc), who's on the train with their daughter. Francois plays a taped interview with Jean-Baptiste, revealing his sexual appeal to both men and women. Lucie (Marie Daems) is convinced that she was his main love. Also on board is his nephew, Jean-Marie (Charles Berling) and Jean-Marie's estranged wife, Claire (Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi), After the funeral in "Europe's largest cemetery," the storyline continues in the mansion of Jean-Baptiste's brother, Lucien (also played by Trintignant). With hand-held camerawork for almost two-thirds of the film, the production involved two extra cars connected to a real scheduled train, headed one way in the morning and returning in the afternoon, with cast and crew logging some 12,000 kilometers over two weeks. Source music runs the gamut from James Brown to Jim Morrison. The title refers to the dying words uttered by the painter -- which actually are the last words spoken by filmmaker Francois Reichenbach who died in 1993 (and appropriated here by his friend, co-scripter Daniele Thompson). One of Francois Reichenbach's best-known films (and subject of an entire book) is the documentary Medicine Ball Caravan (aka We Have Come for Your Daughters,1971), a curious effort to duplicate the success of Woodstock (1970) by simply inviting a large number of musicians, hippies, and counterculture types aboard a cross-country train and filming the result. Shown in competition at the 1998 Cannes Film Festival.Patrice Chereau (Queen Margot) directed this French drama about a train trip to an artist's funeral. Friends of painter Jean-Baptiste Emmerich (Jean-Louis Trintignant, seen in flashbacks) gather at a Paris railroad station for a four-hour journey to Limoges, where Emmerich wanted to be buried. The dozen travelers include art historian Francois (Pascal Greggory) and his lover Louis (Bruno Todeschini), who develops an interest in teenage Bruno (Sylvain Jacques). Traveling parallel with the train is a station wagon with Jean-Baptiste's body, and this vehicle is driven by Thierry (Roschdy Zem), husband of Catherine (Dominique Blanc), who's on the train with their daughter. Francois plays a taped interview with Jean-Baptiste, revealing his sexual appeal to both men and women. Lucie (Marie Daems) is convinced that she was his main love. Also on board is his nephew, Jean-Marie (Charles Berling) and Jean-Marie's estranged wife, Claire (Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi), After the funeral in "Europe's largest cemetery," the storyline continues in the mansion of Jean-Baptiste's brother, Lucien (also played by Trintignant). With hand-held camerawork for almost two-thirds of the film, the production involved two extra cars connected to a real scheduled train, headed one way in the morning and returning in the afternoon, with cast and crew logging some 12,000 kilometers over two weeks. Source music runs the gamut from James Brown to Jim Morrison. The title refers to the dying words uttered by the painter -- which actually are the last words spoken by filmmaker Francois Reichenbach who died in 1993 (and appropriated here by his friend, co-scripter Daniele Thompson). One of Francois Reichenbach's best-known films (and subject of an entire book) is the documentary Medicine Ball Caravan (aka We Have Come for Your Daughters,1971), a curious effort to duplicate the success of Woodstock (1970) by simply inviting a large number of musicians, hippies, and counterculture types aboard a cross-country train and filming the result. Shown in competition at the 1998 Cannes Film Festival.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/18/2000
UPC:
0738329016029
Original Release:
1998
Rating:
NR
Source:
Kino Video
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Letterbox]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
2:02:00
Sales rank:
61,292

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Pascal Greggory Francois
Jean-Louis Trintignant Jean-Baptiste,Lucien
Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi Claire
Charles Berling Jean-Marie
Bruno Todeschini Louis
Sylvain Jacques Bruno
Vincent Perez Viviane
Roschdy Zem Thierry
Dominique Blanc Catherine
Nathan Cogan Sami
Marie Daems Lucie
Thierry de Peretti Actor
Chantal Neuwirth Actor
Genevieve Brunet Actor
Didier Brice Actor
Guillaume Canet Hitchhiker

Technical Credits
Patrice Chéreau Director,Screenwriter
Margot Capelier Casting
Sylvain Chauvelot Art Director
Caroline de Vivaise Costumes/Costume Designer
Charles Gassot Producer
Éric Gautier Cinematographer
François Gedigier Editor
Jacques Hinstin Executive Producer
Jean-Pierre Laforce Sound/Sound Designer
Richard Peduzzi Art Director
Danièle Thompson Screenwriter
Pierre Trividic Screenwriter

Scene Index

Side #1 --
0. Chapter Selections
1. Prologue: Meeting at the Station [8:26]
2. Strained Relationships [11:07]
3. Jean-Baptiste: Alive in Death [10:45]
4. Bruno, Louis, and Francois [10:15]
5. Breaks in the Journey [8:26]
6. The Dead Man's Brother [8:10]
7. Funeral and Aftermath [12:28]
8. A Party of Revelations [9:37]
9. All About Vivane [11:16]
10. Tensions Erupt [8:59]
11. Couples Therapy [15:48]
12. Farewell To Limoges [6:28]

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had no idea what this movie was about before I saw it and it made it so real. All the actors are impeccable. The realism and intelligence of this film given it's colourful plot is astounding. Excellent film but difficult to follow if you don't speak some French.