Tommy
  • Tommy
  • Tommy

Tommy

3.9 11
Director: Ken Russell

Cast: Ann-Margret, Oliver Reed, Roger Daltrey

     
 

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Tommy (Roger Daltrey) is a "deaf, dumb and blind kid" who retreats into himself after the death of his father. His mother, Nora (Ann-Margret), and stepfather Frank (Oliver Reed) take him to see a specialist (Jack Nicholson) but Tommy is apparently a hopeless case. That is, until Tommy discovers that "he sure plays a mean pinball." Tommy gains fame when he defeats the… See more details below

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Overview

Tommy (Roger Daltrey) is a "deaf, dumb and blind kid" who retreats into himself after the death of his father. His mother, Nora (Ann-Margret), and stepfather Frank (Oliver Reed) take him to see a specialist (Jack Nicholson) but Tommy is apparently a hopeless case. That is, until Tommy discovers that "he sure plays a mean pinball." Tommy gains fame when he defeats the Pinball Wizard (Elton John) for the world championship. As a result, Tommy becomes such a celebrity that he even founds his own religious cult. But his fans begin to commercialize his fame, while Tommy wants to stick to the straight and narrow. When Tommy wants to end the commercialization of his message, his supporters accuse him of being hypocritical and turn on him. Ann-Margret, with a slinky red dress slit way up the side, was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar, losing out to Louise Fletcher in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Don Lieberman
Somewhere between Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and The Rocky Horror Picture Show floats 1975’s Tommy, a characteristically trippy cult classic from director Ken Russell, based on the Who's seminal rock opera. It is in every way an inspired interpretation, even if Russell’s approach steamrolls over some of the nuances Pete Townshend wrote into the material. From Tina Turner's electrifying turn as the Acid Queen to Ann-Margret’s jaw-dropping baked-beans bath, Tommy is a sensation. Who front man Roger Daltrey -- who starred in Russell’s Lisztomania the year before, portrays Tommy, the "deaf, dumb, and blind kid" who becomes a pinball wizard and miracle messiah. Ann-Margret’s performance as Tommy's increasingly unhinged mother, a camp masterpiece, earned her nominations for a Golden Globe and an Academy Award. Oliver Reed is perfect as her sleazy lover, and Keith Moon, the Who's madman drummer, is the wicked Uncle Ernie. Jack Nicholson, evidently unfazed by reviews of the vocal stylings he brought to On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, warbles weakly as the doctor who may be able to "cure the boy." Eric Clapton and Elton John also appear for quick look-at-the-rock-star cameos. Russell keeps pouring it on with operatic glee: His mind-bending, over-the-top, psychedelic imagery takes the familiar source material to dizzying new heights, and the viewer on an amazing journey. They don't make 'em like this anymore.
All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
The Who's Tommy was the first rock opera. When it came time to adapt the material for the silver screen, director Ken Russell, with his penchant for irreverent interpretations of classical musicians' lives and works, seemed like a natural fit. Russell certainly shapes the material to fit his particular vision; one is hard-pressed to think of any other filmmaker who would have Ann-Margret roll around in baked beans. Elton John, Eric Clapton, and Jack Nicholson all show up to sing a song, but mostly so that the audience will say, "look, there's more famous people," than to add anything musically or cinematically (only Tina Turner's rendition of "The Acid Queen" improves on, or even equals, the original performances). The album is, despite its length, compact and powerful, while the movie is visually, emotionally, and musically gaudy. Russell's visuals make it continuously watchable, but the film version of Tommy sacrifices the fragile emotional core of Pete Townshend's work for grandiose spectacle. Townshend is more rock, and Russell is more opera. The film adaptation of Quadrophenia would eventually capture Townshend's vision more clearly, but less spectacularly.

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Product Details

Release Date:
09/07/2010
UPC:
0043396341494
Original Release:
1975
Rating:
PG
Source:
Sony Pictures
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
1:51:00
Sales rank:
9,122

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ann-Margret Nora Walker Hobbs
Oliver Reed Frank Hobbs
Roger Daltrey Tommy
Elton John Pinball Wizard
Eric Clapton Preacher
Jack Nicholson Specialist
Robert M. Powell Capt. Walker
Keith Moon Uncle Ernie
Paul Nicholas Cousin Kevin
Tina Turner Acid Queen
Barry Winch Young Tommy
Victoria Russell Sally Simpson
Who Actor
Ben Aris Rev. Simpson
Mary Holland Mrs. Simpson
Imogen Claire Nurse
John Entwistle Himself
Pete Townshend Himself
Arthur Brown Priest
Eddie Stacey Bovver Boy
Jennifer Baker Nurse
Susan Baker Nurse

Technical Credits
Ken Russell Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Stuart Baird Editor
Harry Benn Associate Producer
Jonathan Benson Asst. Director
George Blackler Makeup
Iain Bruce Sound/Sound Designer
Dick Bush Cinematographer
John Clark Art Director
John Comfort Production Manager
Roger Daltrey Score Composer
Paul Dufficey Set Decoration/Design
John Entwistle Score Composer,Screenwriter
Gillian Gregory Choreography
Keith Moon Score Composer
Peter Robb-King Makeup
Bill Rowe Sound/Sound Designer
Shirley Russell Costumes/Costume Designer
Christopher Stamp Executive Producer
Robert Stigwood Producer
Ronnie Taylor Cinematographer
Pete Townshend Score Composer,Musical Direction/Supervision
Beryl Vertue Executive Producer
Ian Whittaker Set Decoration/Design

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