Toy Story

Toy Story

4.6 53
Director: John Lasseter

Cast: John Lasseter, Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Don Rickles

     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Toy Story was the first feature-length film animated entirely by computer. If this seems to be a sterile, mechanical means of moviemaking, be assured that the film is as chock-full of heart and warmth as any Disney cartoon feature. The star of the proceedings is Woody, a pull-string cowboy toy belonging to a wide-eyed youngster named Andy. Whenever Andy's outSee more details below

Overview

Toy Story was the first feature-length film animated entirely by computer. If this seems to be a sterile, mechanical means of moviemaking, be assured that the film is as chock-full of heart and warmth as any Disney cartoon feature. The star of the proceedings is Woody, a pull-string cowboy toy belonging to a wide-eyed youngster named Andy. Whenever Andy's out of the room, Woody revels in his status as the boy's number one toy. His supremacy is challenged by a high-tech, space-ranger action figure named Buzz Lightyear, who, unlike Woody and his pals, believes that he is real and not merely a plaything. The rivalry between Woody and Buzz hilariously intensifies during the first half of the film, but when the well-being of Andy's toys is threatened by a nasty next-door neighbor kid named Sid -- whose idea of fun is feeding stuffed dolls to his snarling dog and reconstructing his own toys into hideous mutants -- Woody and Buzz join forces to save the day. Superb though the computer animation may be, what really heightens Toy Story are the voice-over performances by such celebrities as Tom Hanks (as Woody), Tim Allen (as Buzz), and Don Rickles (as an appropriately acerbic Mr. Potato Head). Director John Lasseter earned a special achievement Academy Award, while Randy Newman landed an Oscar nomination for his evocative musical score.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Karen Backstein
Witty, inventive, and just a little bit offbeat, this high-tech salute to the charm of low-tech playthings will easily win over adults as well as kids. Not your average children's movie, Toy Story was written by Joss Whedon, creator of the critically acclaimed hit TV series Buffy, who shades his sophisticated sense of humor with dark undertones. That said, any child will relate to the simple plot, reminiscent of the children's classic The Velveteen Rabbit, about a favorite toy who fears being replaced in his owner's affections by one that's brighter and newer. And the sadistic bully across the street will send a delightful shiver of recognition down practically everyone's spine. What distinguishes Toy Story is its amazing and groundbreaking computer animation, which creates a realistic world where old-fashioned toys and humans seamlessly interact, as well as a sharp script filled with sly references to everything from Picasso to Star Trek. This truly is a family movie, one great enough to endure the inevitable repeated screenings of understandably spellbound children.
All Movie Guide
Toy Story is the rare film that viewers will remember for years afterward simply for the wordless wonder it inspired in them. The first of its kind, Toy Story arrived as a fully mature organism, as flawlessly animated as it is brilliantly scripted and energetically voiced. It's the kind of singular experience that prompted many amazed viewers to return for a second screening in the theater. While the animation was not yet sophisticated enough to render truly realistic human characters, the digital medium perfectly captured the essential plasticity of the cornucopia of playthings that populate any young boy's bedroom. The notion that toys have a life separate from their owner's play world is a masterstroke, leading to one eye-popping scene after another. The most memorable is a reconnaissance mission by a platoon of small green army figures, who slide down a jump rope and stake out a spot in a potted fern to spy on Andy opening his birthday presents. This early scene gives a preview of the imagination to follow: the soldiers gallop along on the plots of land attached to their feet, and the "camera," as it were, captures them from all angles, like a seasoned auteur. When one of the figures gets injured, accidentally stepped on by Andy's mother, it becomes clear just how quickly director John Lasseter has given these tiny beings a soul that the viewer cares about intensely. To enumerate the screenplay's many clever triumphs would be impossible, but they brim with the limitless possibilities of this medium and these characters. It's also a very funny film, and Tom Hanks and Tim Allen set the standard for a wonderful vocal cast, throwing themselves into the roles with contagious gusto. Toy Story is as sure a guarantee of enjoyment for all ages as anything previously committed to film.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
05/11/2010
UPC:
0786936798333
Original Release:
1995
Rating:
G
Source:
Walt Disney Video
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
1:21:00
Sales rank:
3,151

Special Features

Toy Story 3 sneak peek "The Story"; Buzz Lightyear mission logs: blast off; 3 animated studio stories; Buzz takes Manhatten

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Tom Hanks Woody
Tim Allen Buzz Lightyear
Don Rickles Mr. Potato Head
Jim Varney Slinky Dog
Wallace Shawn Rex
John Morris Andy
John Ratzenberger Hamm
Annie Potts Bo Peep
Erik Von Detten Sid
Laurie Metcalf Mrs. Davis
R. Lee Ermey Sergeant
Sarah Freeman Hannah
Penn Jillette TV Announcer
Jack Angel Voice Only
Greg Berg Voice Only
Kendall Cunningham Voice Only
Bill Farmer Voice Only
Sherry Lynn Voice Only
Scott McAfee Voice Only
Patrick Pinney Voice Only
Philip Proctor Voice Only
Jan Rabson Voice Only
Joe Ranft Voice Only

Technical Credits
John Lasseter Director,Screenwriter
Bonnie Arnold Producer
Edwin Catmull Executive Producer
Joel Cohen Screenwriter
Pete Docter Animator,Screenwriter
Ralph Eggleston Art Director
Ralph Guggenheim Producer
Steve Jobs Producer
Randy Newman Score Composer
Joe Ranft Original Story,Screenwriter
Robert Gordon Editor
Gary Rydstrom Sound/Sound Designer
Alec Sokolow Screenwriter
Andrew Stanton Screenwriter
Lee Unkrich Editor
Joss Whedon Screenwriter

Read More

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Toy Story
4. Sheriff Woody [1:06]
2. Opening Credits ("You've Got a Friend In Me") [2:27]
3. The Coast Is Clear [2:05]
4. The Staff Meeting [2:46]
5. Recon Plan Charlie [1:51]
6. Buzz Lightyear, Space Ranger [1:17]
7. "Strange Things" [1:32]
8. Woody Vs. Buzz [2:33]
9. Sid [1:51]
10. Who Will Andy Pick? [1:28]
11. Buzz Hitches a Ride [1:36]
12. Lost At the Gas Station [2:44]
13. Pizza Planet [4:22]
14. Sid's House [2:46]
15. Back At Andy's [1:28]
16. Playtime With Sid [1:17]
17. The Buzz Lightyear Commercial [1:28]
18. "I Will Go Sailing No More" [2:26]
19. Hannah's Tea Party [1:47]
20. Sid's Window to Andy's Window [1:15]
21. The Big One [2:03]
22. Andy Misses Woody [2:33]
23. "Buzz, I Can't Do This Without You" [2:43]
24. Woody Asks for Help [1:42]
25. "Wind The Frog" [1:08]
26. "Play Nice!" [1:43]
27. The Chase [3:09]
28. Rocket Power [2:35]
29. Christmas In Andy's New House [1:20]
30. End Credits [1:28]

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >