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Two Weeks
     

Two Weeks

4.5 2
Director: Steve Shockman, Steve Stockman, Sally Field, Ben Chaplin

Cast: Steve Shockman, Steve Stockman, Sally Field, Ben Chaplin

 

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Director Steve Stockman takes the helm for this semi-autobiographical comedy drama about an estranged family that comes together for one last goodbye, and finds their assumedly brief farewell inexorably dragged out for two excruciating weeks. Aging matriarch Anita (Sally Field) is dying, but before she goes,

Overview

Director Steve Stockman takes the helm for this semi-autobiographical comedy drama about an estranged family that comes together for one last goodbye, and finds their assumedly brief farewell inexorably dragged out for two excruciating weeks. Aging matriarch Anita (Sally Field) is dying, but before she goes, she has requested that her four grown children travel back home to visit their ailing mother on her deathbed. Eager to gain a better understanding of the dying process, daughter Emily purchases a variety of self-help books on the subject. Though brother Keith (Ben Chaplin) soon arrives determined to float through the process in typical L.A. Zen mode, Emily contends that the only way to be prepared for the future is to consider every detail that can go awry. When PR executive Barry arrives intent on getting some work done before death comes knocking, it appears as if he is more concerned with getting broadband Internet in the house than actually tending to his mother. Meanwhile, youngest brother Matthew sets at the sidelines biding his time as his unlikable wife, Katrina, callously speculates on which of the dying woman's luxurious jewels she will be inheriting. Now, as Anita begins to look back at her life while reflecting on the time spent with her family, the question of who will hold this family together once she is gone casts a melancholy shadow over her fond memories.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/18/2007
UPC:
0027616085702
Original Release:
2006
Rating:
R
Source:
Mgm (Video & Dvd)
Region Code:
1
Time:
1:39:00

Special Features

Audio Commentary by Writer/Director Steve Stockman and Dr. Ira Byock; Deleted Scenes; Learning to Live Through Dying Feaurette; Two Weeks Group Discussion Guide.

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Sally Field Anita Bergman
Ben Chaplin Keith Bergman
Lauren Ellman Flight Attendant
Julianne Nicholson Emily Bergman
Tom Cavanagh Barry Bergman
James Murtaugh Jim Cranston
Amy Hubbard Betsy Straight
Terrence E. McNally Gerald Corwin
Michael Hyatt Carol
Glenn Howerton Matthew Bergman
Clea Duvall Katrina
Jenny O'Hara Julia
Susan Misner Sherry
Anna Grace Smith Sarah
Jeffrey A. Johnson Ben
Lori Beth Edgeman Suzanne
Savannah Eller Jessica
Peggy Walton-Walker Airline Agent
John Will Clay National Guard
Layne Sasser Sylvia
Persephone Felder-Fentress Bedelia Thrush
Alan Dysert Bank Manager
Kenan Thompson Rabbi
Neva Howell Grocery Clerk
Holly Allen Customer Service Rep.
Larry Black Arnie Taubman
Judy Leavell Harriet Taubman

Technical Credits
Steve Shockman Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Steve Stockman Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Paul Brian Anderson Producer
Debra Chiate Editor
Mark Dennison Editor
Pam Dixon Casting,Co-producer
David Donley Production Designer
Anthony Faust Action Director
Patty Galluzzi Musical Direction/Supervision
David Gang Executive Producer
Maryl Georgi Musical Direction/Supervision
Shay Griffin Casting
Curt Hahn Executive Producer
Stephen Kazmierski Cinematographer
Sean Keegan Action Director
Scott Mahalick Executive Producer
John Marias Producer
John Mattingly Asst. Director
Pam Dixon Casting,Co-producer
Thomas Morrison Sound/Sound Designer
Heitor Pereira Score Composer
Steven K. Randolph Costumes/Costume Designer
Jay Rose Sound/Sound Designer

Scene Index

Disc #1, Side A -- Two Weeks - Fullscreen
1. Main Titles/Remember [1:45]
2. Day 1/How to Die [2:43]
3. Morning Routine [3:39]
4. Checklists [2:54]
5. The Process [6:30]
6. Day 4/Instructions [2:33]
7. Best Friends [3:23]
8. Is She Dying? [3:34]
9. Chew and Spit [5:43]
10. Shut it Down [1:52]
11. Conversations [6:44]
12. Day 7/Real Life [4:24]
13. Hug Her [3:49]
14. Second Husband [2:08]
15. The Way it Was [4:04]
16. Finance and Religion [3:27]
17. Morphine Decision [6:16]
18. Don't Overthink [4:34]
19. Day 11/Tension [4:03]
20. Slipped Away [4:21]
21. The Letter [3:02]
22. Stay Close [3:22]
23. Day 14/Ashes [9:16]
24. End Titles [4:14]
Disc #1, Side B -- Two Weeks - Widescreen
1. Main Titles/Remember [1:45]
2. Day 1/How to Die [2:43]
3. Morning Routine [3:39]
4. Checklists [2:54]
5. The Process [6:30]
6. Day 4/Instructions [2:33]
7. Best Friends [3:23]
8. Is She Dying? [3:34]
9. Chew and Spit [5:43]
10. Shut it Down [1:52]
11. Conversations [6:44]
12. Day 7/Real Life [4:24]
13. Hug Her [3:49]
14. Second Husband [2:08]
15. The Way it Was [4:04]
16. Finance and Religion [3:27]
17. Morphine Decision [6:16]
18. Don't Overthink [4:34]
19. Day 11/Tension [4:03]
20. Slipped Away [4:21]
21. The Letter [3:02]
22. Stay Close [3:22]
23. Day 14/Ashes [9:16]
24. End Titles [4:14]

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Two Weeks 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
TWO WEEKS may put a lot of viewers off as it deals confrontationally with the issues of death and dying and yet finds the very human humor that always serves as a relief sidebar in stories (and life incidents) such as this. Steve Stockman wrote, directed and produced this little film and his inspiration and efforts are well served by a fine ensemble cast. It is a story about dying and the effects the finality of that event have on a family that has dispersed in different directions life. Anita Bergman (a phenomenally effective Sally Field) is under hospice care as she faces her last days of dying from gastrointestinal cancer. Knowing that she has little time left she calls upon her four children to return home to North Carolina for goodbyes. Her children are a mixed lot: Keith (Ben Chaplin) is a Zen-influenced California man who has decided to video his mother for posterity Barry (Thomas Cavanagh) is a workaholic who attempts to piece together time for this inconvenient disruption in his work routine Matthew (Glenn Howerton) is the baby of the family dominated by a tactless wife whom the rest of the family detest Emily (a luminous Julianne Nicholson) is the sole sister who has collected all the books on the dying process for her brothers' education and is the stalwart one who holds the family together. Anita divorced the children's father and remarried a quiet man Jim (James Murtaugh) who is essentially ignored or tolerated by the children. Anita shares memories, both tender and hilarious, about her life with her family, and as the hospice nurse Carol (Michael Hyatt) tenderly leads the children through the instructions regarding final care, the four bond again, become more accepting of their disparate directions, share some very funny conversations to relieve the gloom of the event, and interact more than they have since childhood. By the time of the inevitable event come each of the children and their current father have found vulnerabilities and expanded the tokens of love left to them by Anita, now able to carry out Anita's wishes with a modicum of grace and a lot of warmth. Using the last two weeks of life as a platform for coming together provides the film ample opportunity to address many issues - marriage, children, family, religion, and individuality. The film is balanced by the superb performance of Sally Field on the one end and the wholly realized characterization by Julianne Nicholson on the other end. In many ways it is the continuity between the lives of these two women that make the story memorable. There are some fine lessons to be heard in this film, and the telling of the story is very satisfying to watch. Grady Harp
cindycay More than 1 year ago
A few weeks ago, I watched this movie. I knew what the topic was about and I waited till I had the nerve to watch it. My father has been battling throat cancer for 2 years and we knew the cancer was back and chemo was not working. I was going to have to have the conversation with my dad to not do more chemo and to let go. He was suffering so much. This movie showed the real struggles of the family as each of her four children took shifts during the hospice period. It showed how agonizing each part was and how she could not eat and then was not really there. It showed how they had to have that conversation with their mom in her ear to let go and that is was okay which is what I had to do three weeks ago to my dad. It helped me have the courage to say it, so that the suffering could end. It also showed the relief and sadness of the family and also how things triggered their grief after the burial. It was an excellent movie.