Two Women

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Overview

Normally, an actor or actress in a foreign-language film was not the ideal candidate for an Academy Award, inasmuch as his or her English-language "performance" was often dubbed in by an anonymous third party. Such was not the case of Sophia Loren in Two Women (La Ciociara), who did her own English dubbing. Adapted by director Vittorio De Sica and Cesare Zavattini from the novel by Alberto Moravia, Two Women is the semi-neorealist account of widow Cesira (Loren) and her teen-aged daughter, Rosetta (Eleanor ...
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Overview

Normally, an actor or actress in a foreign-language film was not the ideal candidate for an Academy Award, inasmuch as his or her English-language "performance" was often dubbed in by an anonymous third party. Such was not the case of Sophia Loren in Two Women (La Ciociara), who did her own English dubbing. Adapted by director Vittorio De Sica and Cesare Zavattini from the novel by Alberto Moravia, Two Women is the semi-neorealist account of widow Cesira (Loren) and her teen-aged daughter, Rosetta (Eleanor Brown), as they struggle to survive in war-ravaged Italy. A conventional romantic triangle between mother, daughter, and Michele (Jean-Paul Belmondo) is barely under way when the war rears its ugly head once more. Seeking shelter in a bombed-out church, Cesira and Rosetta are attacked and raped by a band of Moroccan soldiers -- a horrifying sequence, capped by a freeze-frame close-up of Rosetta, her face a taut mask of terror (this image was enough to prompt a virulent "anti-smut" editorial in The Saturday Evening Post). Once they've recovered from this appalling experience, mother and daughter are offered a ride back to Rome by friendly truck driver Florindo (Renato Salvatori). Though Cesira had hoped to keep her daughter from compromising herself as a means of survival, she is crushed to discover that Rosetta has given herself to the truck driver in exchange for a pair of stockings. When Cesira and Rosetta finally reconcile, it is a grievous occasion, mourning the death of their mutual love, Michele. A last-minute replacement for Anna Magnani, Sophia Loren brought hitherto untapped depths of emotion to her performance in Two Women; she later insisted that she was utilizing "sensory recall," dredging up memories of her own wartime experiences.
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Special Features

Introduction by Tony Curtis; Original trailer for Sophia Loren's film Operation Crossbow
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Wheeler Winston Dixon
One of Vittorio De Sica's greatest films, featuring one of Sophia Loren's finest performances, Two Women is the sort of film that even European studios don't make anymore, simply because it isn't an inherently commercial project. De Sica, who burst into international prominence with his film Ladri di Biciclette (Bicycle Thieves/The Bicycle Thief, 1948), and then consolidated his reputation with such masterpieces as Umberto D. (1952), Ieri, Oggi, Domani (Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, [1963]), and The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1970), in addition to his work as an actor in more than 150 films from 1917 to 1975, created one of his most compelling and deeply sympathetic films with Two Women, which deservedly won a Golden Globe as the Best Foreign Language Film of 1961. The film also resulted in an Academy Award for Loren as Best Actress, as well as Best Actress at the 1961 Cannes Film Festival. Why is it forgotten today, one wonders? First of all, it is in black and white, and in the hyper-colorized 21st century cinema universe, monochrome severely limits a film's potential audience. Then, too, the film is a deft blend of comedy and tragedy, and for audiences who want a safe middle emotional ground, this film simply doesn't offer that artificial safety net. Structurally, the film is simple: Cesira (Loren) and her young daughter, Rosetta (Eleanora Brown), flee Rome to escape the Allied bombing during World War II, hoping to return to the village of Cesira's birth. Numerous events, some trivial, some major, happen during their journey. Cesira attracts the attention of Michele (Jean-Paul Belmondo), a young man who is kind and attentive, but the war predictably interrupts their romance. In the film's most harrowing sequence, both Cesira and Rosetta are raped simultaneously in a church by a group of renegade soldiers; De Sica stages the sequence in a horrific series of close-ups, as Cesira and Rosetta, pinned to the ground, are unable to help each other, but can only watch as both are violated. In the aftermath of the rape, Cesira suffers a mental breakdown. Now a shadow of her former self, Cesira has no idea how to resume her former life. In the film's tragic denouement, Michele is shot and killed by German soldiers, and Cesira and Rosetta are left to console each other as best they can. De Sica handles the film superbly in each sequence, generous to the actors, knowing precisely where to place the camera for maximum impact. Some viewers objected to the film's episodic structure, but in this, Two Women mimics life itself. De Sica's career as a director is uneven, and he was always in debt due to an insatiable appetite for gambling, which led him to make a number of films that were beneath his considerable talents. But with Two Women, he is absolutely true to his material, and Loren's performance reminds one of Anna Magnani at her most luminous. Two Women is a film to cherish, to view repeatedly, and to remember.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 12/17/2002
  • UPC: 018111236195
  • Original Release: 1960
  • Rating:

  • Source: Delta
  • Region Code: 0
  • Presentation: Black & White
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:50:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Sophia Loren Cesira
Eleanora Brown Rosetta
Jean-Paul Belmondo Michele
Raf Vallone Giovanni
Renato Salvatori Florindo
Carlo Ninchi Michele's Father
Franco Balducci
Curt Lowens
Mario Frera
Emma Baron Maria
Andrea Checchi Fascist
Pupella Maggio Farmer
Luciano Pigozzi "Scimmione"
Technical Credits
Vittorio De Sica Director, Screenwriter
Luisa Alessandri Asst. Director
Giuseppe Annunziata Makeup
Lucio Bompani Production Manager
Mario Capriotti Cinematographer
Gianni Cecchin Production Manager
Elio Costanzi Costumes/Costume Designer, Set Decoration/Design
Joseph E. Levine Executive Producer
Gastone Medin Art Director
Adriana Novelli Editor
Gabor Pogany Cinematographer
Carlo Ponti Producer
Armando Trovajoli Score Composer
Cesare Zavattini Screenwriter
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Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Start [3:09]
2. Plans to Leave [4:33]
3. No Business at This Hour [4:54]
4. The Walk to Naples [7:13]
5. Dodging Bullets [9:31]
6. The Big Lights [2:37]
7. A Walk in the Mountains [5:04]
8. Two English Soldiers [5:03]
9. Straight to Her Head [6:13]
10. Talk of Love [3:14]
11. Hidden Bread [2:36]
12. A Dangerous Walk [8:50]
13. Michael Gets His Kiss [3:05]
14. Food, Water, and a Guide [3:42]
15. The Americans Are Coming [5:46]
16. The Road Back to Rome [3:19]
17. The Unthinkable Happens [4:47]
18. Mad Woman [3:44]
19. "Do You Like to Dance?" [6:23]
20. A Daughter Returns [5:28]
21. Tony Curtis' Parting Words [:53]
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Menu

Side #1 --
   Start
   Index
   Bonus Clip
   Tony Curtis Intro
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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